Waste Water from Oil Fracking Injected into Clean Aquifers

I repeat, wild horses being driven to extinction by the BLM is the canary in the coal mine of what is happening on America’s public lands and to America’s water.  –  Debbie Coffey

SOURCE:  nbcbayarea.com

In a time when California faces an historic drought, the NBC Bay Area Investigative Unit has uncovered that state officials allowed oil and gas companies to pump billions of gallons of waste water into protected aquifers. Investigative Reporter Stephen Stock reports in a story that aired on November 14, 2014.

State officials allowed oil and gas companies to pump nearly three billion gallons of waste water into underground aquifers that could have been used for drinking water or irrigation.

Those aquifers are supposed to be off-limits to that kind of activity, protected by the EPA.

“It’s inexcusable,” said Hollin Kretzmann, at the Center for Biological Diversity in San Francisco. “At (a) time when California is experiencing one of the worst droughts in history, we’re allowing oil companies to contaminate what could otherwise be very useful ground water resources for irrigation and for drinking. It’s possible these aquifers are now contaminated irreparably.”

California’s Department of Conservation’s Chief Deputy Director, Jason Marshall, told NBC Bay Area, “In multiple different places of the permitting process an error could have been made.”

“There have been past issues where permits were issued to operators that they shouldn’t be injecting into those zones and so we’re fixing that,” Marshall added.

In “fracking” or hydraulic fracturing operations, oil and gas companies use massive amounts of water to force the release of underground fossil fuels. The practice produces large amounts of waste water that must then be disposed of.

Marshall said that often times, oil and gas companies simply re-inject that waste water back deep underground where the oil extraction took place. But other times, Marshall said, the waste water is re-injected into aquifers closer to the surface. Those injections are supposed to go into aquifers that the EPA calls “exempt”—in other words, not clean enough for humans to drink or use.

Read EPA’s letter to state regulators

But in the State’s letter to the EPA, officials admit that in at least nine waste water injection wells, the waste water was injected into “non-exempt” or clean aquifers containing high quality water.

For the EPA, “non-exempt” aquifers are underground bodies of water that are “containing high quality water” that can be used by humans to drink, water animals or irrigate crops.

Are Regulators Ignoring California’s New Fracking Law?

If the waste water re-injection well “went into a non-exempt aquifer. It should not have been permitted,” said Marshall.

The department ended up shutting down 11 wells: the nine that were known to be injecting into non-exempt aquifers, and another two in an abundance of caution.

In its reply letter to the EPA, California’s Water Resources Control Board said its “staff identified 108 water supply wells located within a one-mile radius of seven…injection wells” and that The Central Valley Water Board conducted sampling of “eight water supply wells in the vicinity of some of these… wells.”

“This is something that is going to slowly contaminate everything we know around here,” said fourth- generation Kern County almond grower Tom Frantz, who lives down the road from several of the injection wells in question.

According to state records, as many as 40 water supply wells, including domestic drinking wells, are located within one mile of a single well that’s been injecting into non-exempt aquifers.

That well is located in an area with several homes nearby, right in the middle of a citrus grove southeast of Bakersfield.

This well is one of nine that were known to be injecting waste water into “non-exempt” aquifers. It’s located just east of Bakersfield.

State records show waste water from several sources, including from the oil and gas industry, has gone into the aquifer below where 60 different water supply wells are located within a one mile radius.

READ THE REST OF THIS STORY HERE.

Plan to lease Santa Fe National Forest for oil and gas drilling risks community health and cultural resources

SOURCE: enewspf.com

Litigation Prepared to Challenge Illegal 20,000 Acre Public Lands Lease

Santa Fe, NM—(ENEWSPF)—October 20, 2014. A broad coalition of local and national conservation groups announced plans to sue the Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”), if the agency proceeds with the sale of 13 parcels (almost 20,000 acres of public lands) in the Santa Fe National Forest for oil and gas fracking. BLM received more than a hundred letters protesting the sale and challenging the agency’s failure to consider potentially serious impacts to the area’s air, water, wildlife, and surrounding communities.

The leases would allow horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) of the Santa Fe National Forest, a prospect that BLM has never studied. In fact, BLM has admitted that its current resource management plan governing drilling activities, finalized in 2003, is outdated and no longer able serve this essential function.

“In a rush to satisfy the demands of the oil and gas industry, BLM is ignoring its fundamental legal obligations and circumventing the underlying oil and gas drilling planning process,” said Kyle Tisdel, attorney with the Western Environmental Law Center. “There is broad commitment from groups to go to court if necessary to ensure our treasured landscapes are not destroyed.”

“BLM has already leased 94% of our public lands around the Farmington area for oil and gas drilling,” said Mike Eisenfeld, New Mexico Energy Coordinator for San Juan Citizens Alliance. “This new lease sale on the Santa Fe National Forest would continue this reckless, lease-everywhere mentality that destroys recreation, wildlife, and cultural resources and ignores BLM’s responsibilities to honestly analyze impacts.”

“Oil and gas drilling these days is significantly different than that of only 11 years ago,” said Pete Dronkers, Southwest Circuit Rider for Earthworks.  “The wells are bigger, go deeper and for miles in every direction. They release far more hazardous waste into the air and water.  BLM has to study these newer impacts before it permits further drilling in the San Juan Basin.”

The lease sale is scheduled for 9:00 a.m., on Wednesday, October 22, 2014 at the BLM New Mexico State Office in Santa Fe.

The coalition of conservation groups is represented by Western Environmental Law Center, and includes: Amigos Bravos, Chaco Alliance, Earthworks, Rio Arriba Concerned Citizens, San Juan Citizens Alliance, and WildEarth Guardians.

BLM Stoops To Low Bargain Basement Fees for Public Lands

I thought it was bad enough when the BLM was charging $2 an acre for oil and gas leases, but now I see (from the Elko Daily news article below) that the BLM is leasing public lands for bargain basement fees of $1.50 an acre.  And for NONCOMPETITIVE geothermal leases, it’s only $1 an acre for 10 years!  What will the BLM do next?  Just tell these bidders to set out their lawn chairs and take whatever public lands they want?  (Oh wait, they just about do that now, since the bidders tell the BLM what parcels they want them to nominate.)

And it seems like only yesterday that the BLM Elko District was crying about the DROUGHT.

Let’s take a look at this equation:

We’re running out of water because there’s a severe drought + BLM leases public lands for pennies to “uses” that use LOTS of water + blame everything on the wild horses & burros and get rid of them = BLM “management” of public lands is ______ (you fill in the blank, but please don’t use swear words on the blog).

Anyhow, if you look at the BLM’s PUBLIC LAND STATISTICS for 2013, you’ll get a look at the bigger picture.

Besides the fact that the title of the article below refers to public lands as “BLM Land,” the links in the article don’t work, but you can go HERE to look at the Elko District oil & gas leases and HERE to look at the geothermal leases.

SOURCE:  elkodaily.com

BLM to Auction BLM Land in Elko for Oil Exploration

RENO — More than 64,000 acres of public land in the Elko District are up for bid in a competitive oil and gas lease sale 9 a.m. today at the Bureau of Land Management state office, 1340 Financial Blvd., Reno.

The BLM will include 44 parcels for lease. Registration and assignment of bidding numbers begin at 8 a.m.

The BLM offers quarterly oil and gas sales. The last Elko District sale on March 12, 2013, generated more than $1.2 million with the sale of 31 parcels covering more than 38,000 acres.

A second oil and gas sale will take place after, for 29 parcels in the Winnemucca and Carson City districts.

Parcels are nominated by industry representatives in advance of a sale.  The BLM reviews each parcel for any resource conflicts, which can result in stipulations placed on the parcel, deferral or partial deferral.

A complete summary of the parcels to be offered, GIS shapefiles and other documents related to the oil and gas sales are available online at http://on.doi.gov/1oXmCgT.

Oil and gas leases are for 10-year periods with annual rentals of $1.50 per acre for the first five years and $2 per acre after that until production begins.

Once a lease is producing, a royalty of 12.5 percent is charged.  Half of the bid and rental receipts go to the state.

Geothermal Lease

The BLM will have a competitive geothermal lease sale Wednesday at the BLM state office.

Registration begins at 8 a.m. and the sale begins at 9.  The sale includes two parcels in Nevada totaling more than 3,400 acres.  One parcel is located on the Winnemucca District, the second is located in the Carson City District.

There will also be five parcels located in Oregon.

Geothermal leases are for a 10-year period.  Annual rental for a competitive lease is $2 per acre for the first year, and $3 per acre until year 10.

Annual rental for a noncompetitive lease is $1 per acre for up to 10 years.

Additional environmental analysis would need to be conducted to receive permits to drill or build a facility to develop the energy from the geothermal source.

A complete summary of the parcels to be offered, GIS shapefiles and other documents related to the geothermal lease sale are available at http://on.doi.gov/1qCHSsY.

Fracking depleting water supplies in driest areas

When the BLM issues Environmental Assessments or Drought plans to round up wild horses because there’s not enough water or forage, or ranchers complain about the 20 gallons of water per day that a wild horse may drink, be sure to check out the oil and gas leases and oil and gas lease maps for that BLM District. – Debbie Coffey

SOURCE: theguardian.com

Fracking is depleting water supplies in America’s driest areas, report shows

From Texas to California, drilling for oil and gas is using billions of gallons of water in the country’s most drought-prone areas

by Suzanne Goldenberg, US environment correspondent  Feb. 5, 2014

Aerial of Fracking Drill Shale Sites in Colorado
An aerial photograph shows a large field of fracking sites in a north-western Colorado valley. It can take millions of gallons of fresh water to frack a single well. Photograph: Susan Heller/Getty images

America’s oil and gas rush is depleting water supplies in the driest and most drought-prone areas of the country, from Texas to California, new research has found.

Of the nearly 40,000 oil and gas wells drilled since 2011, three-quarters were located in areas where water is scarce, and 55% were in areas experiencing drought, the report by the Ceres investor network found.

Fracking those wells used 97bn gallons of water, raising new concerns about unforeseen costs of America’s energy rush.

“Hydraulic fracturing is increasing competitive pressures for water in some of the country’s most water-stressed and drought-ridden regions,” said Mindy Lubber, president of the Ceres green investors’ network.

Without new tougher regulations on water use, she warned industry could be on a “collision course” with other water users.

“It’s a wake-up call,” said Prof James Famiglietti, a hydrologist at the University of California, Irvine.  “We understand as a country that we need more energy but it is time to have a conversation about what impacts there are, and do our best to try to minimise any damage.”

It can take millions of gallons of fresh water to frack a single well, and much of the drilling is tightly concentrated in areas where water is in chronically short supply, or where there have been multi-year droughts.

Half of the 97bn gallons of water was used to frack wells in Texas, which has experienced severe drought for years – and where production is expected to double over the next five years.

Shortage of water and fracking in Texas
Large hoses run from hydraulic fracturing drill sites in Midland, Texas. Fracking uses huge amounts water to free oil and natural gas trapped deep in underground rocks. With fresh water not as plentiful, companies have been looking for ways to recycle their waste. Photograph: Pat Sullivan/AP

Farming and cities are still the biggest users of water, the report found.  But it warned the added demand for fracking in the Eagle Ford, at the heart of the Texas oil and gas rush, was hitting small, rural communities hard.

“Shale producers are having significant impacts at the county level, especially in smaller rural counties with limited water infrastructure capacity,” the report said.  “With water use requirements for shale producers in the Eagle Ford already high and expected to double in the coming 10 years, these rural counties can expect severe water stress challenges in the years ahead.”

Local aquifer levels in the Eagle Ford formation have dropped by up to 300ft over the last few years.

A number of small communities in Texas oil and gas country have already run out of water or are in danger of running out of water in days, pushed to the brink by a combination of drought and high demand for water for fracking.

Twenty-nine communities across Texas could run out of water in 90 days, according to the Texas commission on environmental quality.  Many reservoirs in west Texas are at only 25% capacity.

Nearly all of the wells in Colorado (97%) were located in areas where most of the ground and surface water is already stretched between farming and cities, the report said.  It said water demand for fracking in the state was expected to double to 6bn gallons by 2015 – or about twice as much as the entire city of Boulder uses in a year.

In California, where a drought emergency was declared last month, 96% of new oil and gas wells were located in areas where there was already fierce competition for water.

The pattern holds for other regions caught up in the oil and gas rush.  Most of the wells in New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming were also located in areas of high water stress, the report said.

Shale gas and water use in the US

Picture_131
Source: Ceres

Some oil and gas producers were beginning to recycle water, especially in the Marcellus shale in Pennsylvania, the report said.  But it said those savings were too little to offset the huge demand for water for fracking in the coming years.

BLM Digs Deeper Into Man-Made Drought

SOURCE:  PPJ Gazette

By Debbie Coffey    Copyright 2013        All Rights Reserved.

During a proclaimed drought across much of the West, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in the Ely District of Nevada is offering up 399,873 acres of public lands for oil & gas lease sales.

This is being done even though “Fracking requires enormous quantities of water.  Estimates put water usage at between 3 and 5 million gallons per fracking of a single well, and each well can be fracked several times.”

The BLM issued an Environmental Assessment (EA) to lease these 399,873 acres June 28, 2013, only a month after issuing an EA to remove wild horses because “there is insufficient vegetation or water to maintain the wild horses’ health and well being.”

If there isn’t enough water for wild horses, how can there possibly be enough water for oil & gas exploration and development? Where is the water going to come from?

The map below shows the oil & gas lease sale parcel areas in red, and some of the wild horse Herd Management Areas (HMAs), including Triple B (Buck-Bald & Butte), Antelope, Maverick-Medicine and Antelope Valley (which includes the Dolly Varden Range).

Scan_Pic0079

Now, take a look at these same HMAs below, with the red oil & gas lease sale area, including some of the groundwater basins in blue.

Scan_Pic0080

(Even though the red area may look small, there is a potential for a water drawdown and risk of water contamination over the area of the entire groundwater basin.  And, there is inter-flow between basins.)

The map below shows a Grazing Allotment map, along with an outline of the wild horse HMAs and the oil & gas lease areas in red.

Scan_Pic0082

Scientific American published an article regarding fracking wastewater wells, stating “Over the past several decades, U.S. industries have injected more than 30 trillion gallons of toxic liquid deep into the earth, using broad expanses of the nation’s geology as an invisible dumping ground.”

Many ranchers have been pushing for the removal of wild horses, seeing them as competition to their grazing interests.  In reality, the ranchers’ biggest competition is, and will be, from water guzzling uses like oil & gas extraction and mining.  If there is less water, there is less forage.

Even during the drought, the BLM is approving the expansion of existing mines and the opening of new mines.

Just one mine in Nevada (Barrick Gold’s Goldstrike Mine) has pumped over 383 BILLION gallons of water from an aquifer. Nearly 10 million gallons of water a day is draining away from the driest state in the nation. (Kirk Johnson, New York Times).

Mining drops the water table and dries up streams and seeps.

In 2010, the BLM gave the green light to the expansion of the Bald Mountain Mine within the Triple B Herd Management Area (HMA), even knowing the mine caused mercury in the watershed and higher levels of arsenic in the surface water.

The U.S. is still using the General Mining Law of 1872.   Senator Harry Reid has been “instrumental in blocking efforts to reform the archaic General Mining Law of 1872, a legal blank check” that “allowed miners to take an estimated $408 billion worth of gold and other hard rock minerals from public lands without paying a single cent in royalties…”

“Before Congress banned the practice in 1994, Toronto-based Barrick Gold paid just $9,765 for 1,950 acres in Nevada that held an estimated $10 billion in gold.”

To make one gold wedding band, about 20 tons of earth must be excavated.  Yet, when the BLM issues an EA to roundup wild horses, they show photos like the one below of the supposed “severe use” of the land by wild horses.

Scan_Pic0083

Do you think the BLM ever shows photos of a quarter or a pen next to a big mining pit or next to an oil derrick?

The reason the wild horses are facing dehydration and death right now is because of a man-made drought, caused by the BLM’s mismanagement of public lands.   Uses that make the most money are being fast tracked, no matter what the consequences, even though this is a blatant violation of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act.

“Scientists warned that as the Great Basin’s groundwater is drained, desert springs and seeps will dry up, farms and ranches will wither away, and plants and wildlife will die off.   The aquifer, which took millennia to fill, will run out.”

Soon, there won’t be wild horses left on public lands.  There also won’t be farming, ranching, hunting or fishing.  There just won’t be enough water. This is the “Industrialization of the West.”  Unless you do what you can to stop it.

Send your comments on the proposed lease sale by July 29, 2013 to the Ely District Office, by email to blm_nv_eydo_dec2013ogsale@blm.gov

The Environmental Assessment for the upcoming Dec. 2013 oil & gas lease sale: https://www.blm.gov/epl-front-office/projects/nepa/36744/43653/46903/PRELIM_EA_-_EYDO_Oil_&_Gas_Lease_Sale_Dec._2013.pdf

To Learn More:

“Is Fracking Behind Contamination of Wyoming Groundwater?” http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=is-fracking-behind-contamination-in-wyoming-groundwater

“The BLM Overlooks Arsenic & Mercury, but Gets Rid of Wild Horses” http://rtfitchauthor.com/2012/06/28/blm-overlooks-arsenic-mercury-but-gets-rid-of-wild-horses/

“The Mining of our Aquifers” http://ppjg.me/2010/07/28/the-mining-of-our-aquifers/

“Chinese Government Money is Buying on of USA’s Biggest Mines” http://ppjg.me/2010/12/07/chinese-government-money-is-buying-one-of-u-s-a-%E2%80%99s-biggest-mines/

“Senator Reid is Working Hard, but for Whom?” http://www.libertynewsonline.com/article_301_29167.php

SOURCES:

http://ecowatch.com/2013/record-drought-frackers-outcompete-farmers-water/

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=are-fracking-wastewater-wells-poisoning-ground-beneath-our-feeth&WT.mc_id=SA_emailfriend

“Harry Reid, Gold Member: Is Our Senator in bed with America’s worst polluter?” by Josh Harkinson (2/24/09) Mother Jones http://motherjones.com/environment/2009/02/harry-reid-gold-member

New York Times “Drier, Tainted Nevada May Be Legacy of Gold Rush” by Kirk Johnson (12/30/05) http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/30/national/30gold.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

http://www.blm.gov/pgdata/etc/medialib/blm/nv/field_offices/elko_field_office/information/nepa/eas/triple_b_water_haul.Par.93691.File.dat/Three_HMA_EA.pdf

https://www.blm.gov/epl-front-office/projects/nepa/36744/43653/46903/PRELIM_EA_-_EYDO_Oil_&_Gas_Lease_Sale_Dec._2013.pdf

BLM’s Oil & Gas Lease Corruption Exposed

SOURCE:  PPJ GAZETTE

By Debbie Coffey, Director of Wild Horse Affairs, WHFF                                       Copyright 2013                        All Rights Reserved.

____________________________________________________

“The REAL criminals, the BLM, who are sale/leasing our public lands for as little as $2 an acre, who allow “volunteers” paid for by oil companies to process the permits, and do NOT abide by the law, continue to go unchecked. ”

__________________________________________________________

Outbidding the rigged bids at BLM auction

“On December 19, 2008 Tim DeChristopher disrupted a highly disputed Utah BLM Oil and Gas lease auction, effectively safeguarding thousands of acres of pristine Utah land that were slated for oil and gas leases. Not content to merely protest outside, Tim entered the auction hall and registered as bidder #70. He outbid industry giants on land parcels (which, starting at $2 an acre, were adjacent to national treasures like Canyonlands National Park), winning 22,000 acres of land worth $1.7 million before the auction was halted.

Public attention was suddenly focused on the land that the BLM was going to lease for oil exploration, and “Two months later, incoming Interior Secretary Ken Salazar invalidated the auction.”  

David Letterman had environmental activist Tim DeChristopher as a guest on his show recently to talk about this BLM oil and gas lease sale, and this (approximately) 12 minute segment is a MUST SEE, not only for wild horse advocates, but for anyone who cares about clean drinking water, uncontaminated aquifers, the safety of food and the health of American families.

http://www.cbs.com/shows/late_show/video/QS4c4xf6Z5joEaGFbCB3MXIEujBS54Nd/david-letterman-environmental-activist-tim-dechristopher/

There is a new documentary out called “Bidder 70,” which is about DeChristopher.  Here is the trailer:

DeChristopher paid a high price for saving these public lands.  He was sentenced to 2 years in a federal prison and a $10,000 fine.  Please read Tim DeChristopher’s entire statement here:

The REAL criminals, the BLM, who are sale/leasing our public lands for as little as $2 an acre, who allow “volunteers” paid for by oil companies to process the permits, and do NOT abide by the law, continue to go unchecked.  And the oil companies, who can let the BLM know what lands they are interested in buying (so they’re actually able to SELECT the public lands they want to rape) continue to “STEAL” from the American public by not paying what the lands are worth.

Not only that, during drought, deep-pocketed energy companies have also driven up the price of water, and farmers can’t compete.  Prices were about “$9 to $100 for an acre-foot of water in auctions held by cities with excess supplies. But these days, energy companies are paying some cities $1,200 to $2,900 per acre-foot.”

These BLM oil and gas lease sales are happening over and over again, throughout the West.  In Wyoming, the BLM has leased much of the land in wild horse Herd Management Areas for fracking, while claiming the few remaining wild horses are “degrading” the range, and then removing them from their (supposedly) federally protected areas.

Fracking requires enormous quantities of water. Estimates put water usage at between 3 and 5 million gallons per fracking of a single well, and each well can be fracked several times.”

BLM has plans to remove wild horses because of drought (so they don’t have to do an Environmental Assessment), while at the same time, they plan sale/leasing public lands in the area for oil & gas development (a big shout out to the BLM Elko District in Nevada).

Just in March, 2013, the BLM Elko District sold over 45,000 acres for oil and gas exploration.

 but yet, a few months later, they plan to remove wild horses in 3 Herd management Areas (Triple B, Maverick-Medicine, and the western and central portions of the Antelope Valley) leaving ONLY 548-1,015 wild horses on 1,839,459 acres of public land.  (That’s about 1 horse per about 1,800 acres at the most, and at the lower range, it’s about 1 horse per 3,600 acres.)

Yet, the BLM again perpetrates fraud against the American public by claiming “With the lack of needed precipitation this past fall and winter, BLM expects that there will be a lack of available water for wild horses in the summer and fall months ahead.”

Scientific American just published an article regarding fracking wastewater wells and states “Over the past several decades, U.S. industries have injected more than 30 trillion gallons of toxic liquid deep into the earth, using broad expanses of the nation’s geology as an invisible dumping ground.”

Are Fracking Wastewater Wells Poisoning the Ground Beneath our Feet?

Is this BLM’s “thriving natural ecological balance?”

Will Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell call a halt to oil and gas lease auctions in areas of drought?

In what seems to be a perfect “ending” to this article (besides thanking Tim DeChristopher), David Letterman says it best when he talks about fracking (this was on his show last year, but it’s still very relevant), “We’re Screwed.”

SOURCES:

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705388228/Activist-Timothy-DeChristopher-sentenced-to-2-years-in-prison.html?pg=all

http://www.bidder70film.com/#!about/cee5

http://www.cbs.com/shows/late_show/video/QS4c4xf6Z5joEaGFbCB3MXIEujBS54Nd/david-letterman-environmental-activist-tim-dechristopher/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKb8zcLqJjM

http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/info/newsroom/2013/may/elko__blm_releases0.html

http://www.commondreams.org/view/2011/07/26-13

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=are-fracking-wastewater-wells-poisoning-ground-beneath-our-feethHYPERLINK

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/20/david-letterman-fracking-screwed_n_1687028.html

Dept. of Interior Responds to Congressional Letter on Wild Horses

KRNV Reno News 4

Ken Salazar may be gone but the damage he caused the wild horses and burros still remains.

Ken Salazar may be gone but the damage he caused the wild horses and burros still remains.

You’ll have to click on the link above to read the article, since AP is not allowing this copyrighted material to be published or redistributed, we cannot copy the text here.

Just as BLM set a very narrow scope in the parameters of the study by the National Academy of Sciences, after 30 Congressional representatives sent a letter to Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell, to ask for the reform of the Wild Horse & Burro Management Program, it seems the Dept. of Interior will only be responding to “additional opportunities for population control.”

But, it’s a big deal they even responded.  Ken Salazar didn’t bother to respond.

It is our hope that the Department of the Interior doesn’t omit reform issues like humane handling and BLM’s fraudulent Environmental Assessments that blame degradation of the range on only the wild horses, while there is an increase in oil and gas development (AND FRACKING), mining, livestock grazing and other uses.  We’re tired of wild horses getting the short end of the stick, and we just won’t stand for it.  No more “You have to go slow to go fast,” as Senior Consultant Dean Bolstad kept using as an excuse at the National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board meeting.

Many wild horse advocacy groups are going over the National Academy of Sciences report with a fine tooth comb, and we will give you, as well as CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THE MEDIA, our assessments.

The heat is on, thanks to so many of YOU who have been making phone calls and writing letters.  Keep it up!