Stop the BLM from sending older wild horses to slaughter

PLEASE SHARE THIS LINK ON YOUR FACEBOOK PAGES!  The older wild horses are the most vulnerable to end up in the slaughter pipeline.  We need to find adopters.

painy

Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_Logo

 

Listen to the ARCHIVED SHOW Here!

This is a 1 hour show, recorded Nov. 19, 2014.

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Tonight’s guests are Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation and Ginger Kathrens, the Founder and Executive Director of The Cloud Foundation.  

Both fought to keep wild horses on federally protected Herd Management Areas in Wyoming, and both witnessed the roundups of these wild horses.  And both are among those posting photos of the wild horses that were captured in Wyoming, so that these horses can be adopted rather than end up going to slaughter in the future.

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You can read Carol Walker’s article HERE, but some excerpts are below:

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Beautiful young mares 1-4 years old in pen 21

I have broken the photos down into age groups.

First are the foals and weanlings in this link:

http://www.livingimagescjw.com/CLIENTS/14NovemberCanonCityWeanlings/

Images 1-5 in pen 13A, images 6-57 are in the two adjoining weanling pens, 36C and 36D, images 146-149 are in pen 23.

Then the young mares, ages 1-4 in this link:

http://www.livingimagescjw.com/CLIENTS/14NovemberCanonCityYoungMares/

Images 59-93 are in pen 21, images 94-100 are in pen “No Man’s Land”, images 101-125 are in pen 22 and images 126-145 are in pen 25.

Then the young stallions, (soon to be gelded) ages 1-4 in this link:

http://www.livingimagescjw.com/CLIENTS/14NovemberCanonCityYoungStallions/

Images 150-155 are in pen 8B, images 156-225 are in pens 3 and F, images 226-246 are in pen G.

The older mares, ages 5 and up are here:

http://www.livingimagescjw.com/CLIENTS/14NovemberCanonCityOlderMares/

Images 339-387 are in pen 26, images 388-441 are in pen 18. You may notice hip brands on some of these mares – this is because they were treated with birth control, PZP either in December of 2013 and/or October of 2010.

The older stallions, 5 and up:

http://www.livingimagescjw.com/CLIENTS/14NovemberCanonCityOlderStallions

Images 247-313 and 327-338 are in pens 19b and 19C, images 314-327 are in pen 9.

photo below, 2 of the older stallions

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photo below, some older mares

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PLEASE NOTE, MARES COULD BE PREGNANT, SO YOU COULD BE GETTING 2 FOR THE PRICE OF 1, BUT BE AWARE WHEN FACTORING IN THE PRICE OF HAY AND CARE, TO MAKE SURE YOU CAN AFFORD 2 HORSES.

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Two stunning weanlings, a dun 9135 and a grulla 9133 in pen 36C

 

You can use the neck tag numbers on the horses for identification purposes.

Some notes about the horses – the 9000 numbers are from Great Divide Basin, the 7000 numbers are from Salt Wells Creek and Adobe Town.  They do not list any horses as being from Adobe Town, but there are Adobe Town horses mixed in with the Salt Wells Creek horses.

These are NOT all the horses brought in during the Checkerboard Roundup.  The other 600+ are at Rock Springs Corrals.  They are not ready for adoption there yet.  There are also about 100 weanlings and yearlings and two year olds from Salt Wells Creek that went to Axtell, Utah’s wild burro facility.

IF YOU CAN ADOPT A HORSE:

You can call to adopt at anytime with an approved adoption application).  To find out more about individual horses or to download adoption forms can be found at these links:

http://www.blm.gov/co/st/en/BLM_Programs/wild_horse_and_burro.html

https://www.blm.gov/adoptahorse/onsitegallery.php?horseCategory=99

Through the Canon City BLM office, the first 150 miles of shipping is FREE!  (If 5 people in the same area adopt, that means 750 miles are free, so buddy up!)  There are group shipping options as well for folks that are interested in the horses, but live a distance away.  Please contact the BLM office directly for specifics.

Lona Kossnar at (719) 269-8539, or email her at lkossnar@blm.gov

Please be kind to and patient with Lona – she will have lots of folks contacting her and I know she will do her very best to help all of you!

Pam Nickoles was also there photographing and you can view her images here:

(http://www.nickolesphotography.com/f106188461) entitled “Canon City BLM Checkerboard Horses”

And Amanda Wilder, who has images on her Facebook page with each horse identified by tag number:

https://www.facebook.com/amanda.wilder.9/media_set?set=a.956769531003850.1073741848.100000124357258&type=1&pnref=story

and photos are also on The Cloud Foundation website

This radio show is hosted by Debbie Coffey, Vice-President & Director of Wild Horse Affairs at Wild Horse Freedom Federation.

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To contact us: ppj1@hush.com, or call 320-281-0585

LISTEN TO ARCHIVED RADIO SHOWS: Continue reading

Happy Thanksgiving!

From the volunteer Board of Directors at Wild Horse Freedom Federation we would like to wish the very best to you and your family and friends; it is our most sincere hope that each and everyone of you have a veritable cornucopia of things to be thankful for…but we do ask one thing this day; don’t forget to give thanks for all of the other passengers aboard this planet earth, particularly our equine companions who give so very much more than they ever receive in return.  Be thankful that we know the horses, donkeys, mules and burros as the world would be so very empty without the majesty and beauty provided to us by our four legged, hooved friends.  Have a great, robust and bountiful day.  Happy Thanksgiving!”  ~ R.T.


“Wild horses protect the plains. Their digestive tract can’t break down seeds, so when they eat plants and then continue to roam, they deposit whole seeds on the ground in their feces. Later, the seeds germinate and keep plant populations strong. Wild horses also help other animals survive the winter. When water sources freeze, horses break the ice with their hooves, providing smaller animals with the opportunity to drink.”

SOURCE: fresnobee.com

by Michelle Kretzer

Why we should give thanks for animals

Entry of the Animals Into Noah's Ark

Most of us share our homes with animals, so we know that they provide us with companionship, teach us how to love unconditionally and help us enjoy the outdoors and get more exercise. But wild animals also quietly provide us with many other benefits that we rarely notice. As we count our blessings this Thanksgiving, let’s pause to consider the other species who share our planet and the many ways that they make our lives better.

Oysters, clams and mussels clean up the ocean. As these industrious little bivalves suck in ocean water to feed on bacteria and phytoplankton, they also ingest pollutants and other harmful chemicals and send the filtered water back into the sea.

Dolphins are do-gooders. Pods of wild dolphins are a breathtaking sight, and they can also be a lifesaving one. There have been dozens of reports of humans and dogs who were rescued from drowning by dolphins. Scientists believe that since dolphins are smart, altruistic animals, they can recognize when other species are in danger and will work to save them.

Beavers are dam handy. By helping to regulate waterways with their dams, busy beavers help prevent floods and droughts and lessen the damage done by forest fires.

You’d be nuts not to respect squirrels. Trees and plants can rely on squirrels to help them reproduce. As squirrels bury nuts and seeds to stockpile for winter, they sometimes forget where some of them are buried. Thus, the nuts and seeds germinate, growing new trees and plants and sustaining a healthy ecosystem.

Sharks deserve a fair shake. Their strong immune system allows them to eat weak, old and sick fish, which prevents disease from spreading among sea life and also keeps the oceans healthy.

Ants have contributed to aviation and made flying more pleasant. Have you been on a flight that offered open seating? Thank ants. To determine the most efficient way to get all passengers on board, one airline studied highly organized ant colonies, which demonstrated the ant equivalent of open seating.

Birds are talented recyclers. They repurpose our trash, especially items such as string and paperclips, as they build their nests. Male bowerbirds in Australia are particularly fond of picking up pieces of brightly colored plastic to build their “bowers,” arched walkways that are beautifully decorated in order to attract females.

Wild horses protect the plains. Their digestive tract can’t break down seeds, so when they eat plants and then continue to roam, they deposit whole seeds on the ground in their feces. Later, the seeds germinate and keep plant populations strong. Wild horses also help other animals survive the winter. When water sources freeze, horses break the ice with their hooves, providing smaller animals with the opportunity to drink.

Bats deserve a big pat on the back. Little brown bats can eat more than 600 mosquitoes in one hour. And if that’s not enough to make bats your favorite animal, consider this: Bats also pollinate Agave tequilana, the plant that gives us tequila.

Moles win the garden club award. Many gardeners value skunks, raccoons, moles and other animals because the small holes that they dig in lawns and gardens when in search of grubs aerate the soil. These animals also eat the grubs who would otherwise prey on a gardener’s plants.

Animals improve our lives every day in countless important but little-known ways. Perhaps it’s time that we thanked and repaid them – simply by letting them live undisturbed and free.

 

Rep. Grijalva Elected Ranking Member of Natural Resources Committee

Rep. Raúl Grijalva ~ a friend to Horses, Burros and the American Dream

Rep. Raúl Grijalva ~ a friend to Horses, Burros and the American Dream

SOURCE: grijalva.house.gov

Wednesday November 19, 2014

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, Congressman Raúl Grijalva (D-AZ) was elected Ranking Member of the House Natural Resources Committee, which is charged with preserving America’s public lands, nation’s parks, fisheries, wildlife, as well as oversight over Native American affairs and mineral land laws.

Grijalva, a life-long proponent of environmental stewardship, has served on the committee since arriving in Congress in 2003, and has held the distinction as the highest ranking Democrat on the Natural Resources Subcommittee on Public Lands and Environmental Regulation since January 2007.

“I am honored to be elected Ranking Member of the Natural Resources Committee in the 114th Congress,” said Rep. Grijalva. “Our environmental protections will be challenged like never before under the Republican-controlled House and Senate, but under my leadership, Natural Resources Democrats will ensure the protections that took generations to build up will not be torn down.”

Grijalva’s ascent to the top Democratic seat comes after years of proactive work on the Natural Resources Committee. Over his 12 years of tenure, Grijalva authored four bills protecting the rights of Native Americans and providing vital services on reservations that have been signed into law. In 2008, Grijalva authored legislation that created the National Landscape Conservation System, which includes 877 federally recognized areas and approximately 30 million acres of National Monuments, National Conservation Areas, Wilderness Areas, Wilderness Study Areas, Wild and Scenic Rivers, National Scenic and Historic Trails, and Conservation Lands of the California Desert. In 2011, he worked closely with then-Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar to have 1 million acres of land near the Grand Canyon withdrawn from the threats posed by Uranium mining for a minimum of 20 years.

“My drive and my passion as a legislator are for these issues and this committee,” Grijalva continued. “As Ranking Member, I will fight to ensure the American people are properly compensated for the minerals mined on federal land. I will continue my efforts to ensure oil companies don’t cut corners to place the pursuit of massive profits over the well being of the American people. And while I will oppose Republican

BLM Rescinds Permit for Deadly Wolf Derby

“Good news for the Wild Horses & Burros on two counts:

  1. Leaving predators on public lands may FINALLY allow mother nature to manage wildlife correctly as she has since the beginning of time.
  2. Hope that public pressure/opinion truly can have an impact on the BLM and the means in which they mismanage public lands…keep the faith!” ~ R.T.

Defenders of the predator’s introduction decry what they call Idaho’s “War on Wolves.”

TWIN FALLS • The U.S. Bureau of Land Management has withdrawn its permit to allow a wolf and coyote derby on public land near Salmon.

Seven groups had been suing to stop the derby planned by the hunter rights group Idaho for Wildlife to hold on public land in January.

The lawsuits and pile of public comments in opposition to the derby likely led to the BLM’s decision, Defenders of Wildlife spokesman Shawn Cantrell said Tuesday.

“I think one can infer some combination of those two led to the decision,” he said. “We’re obviously very pleased that they have.”

The BLM had approved the five-year permit a couple of weeks ago, saying no significant environmental impact from the derby was apparent.

Now the derby will be held on private land, as it was last year, said Idaho for Wildlife spokesman Steve Alde. The BLM permit would have roughly doubled the land available by providing access to federal land.

“The BLM at the D.C. level has become too politically influenced and motivated,” Alde said, as requiring an extensive environmental review “for only 100 to 150 hunters to cover over 3 million acres is absurd and ridiculous.”

The first derby in December 2013 drew about 100 hunters and negative media attention from outside Idaho. The news website Vice ran a lengthy article by someone who went undercover to participate.

Last year, 21 coyotes were killed but no wolves. The wolves were the focus, though, of derby supporters and opponents.

Wolves were largely eradicated decades ago, but they have been a controversial issue in Idaho and elsewhere in the West since their reintroduction in the 1990s, often pitting environmentalists against ranchers, hunters and others who didn’t want to see wolves return.

Defenders of the predator’s introduction decry what they call Idaho’s “War on Wolves.”

Wolf hunting started in Idaho in 2008. The political argument since has been how much hunting to allow and how much state money to spend controlling the wolf population.

The Republican-dominated Legislature, with Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s strong support, created a Wolf Depredation Control Board earlier this year to oversee the killing of problem wolves.

daho Democrats tend to favor killing fewer wolves and spending less money to do it. Environmental groups in Blaine County, one of Idaho’s few blue bastions, have been leading the way, working with local sheepherders on non-lethal wolf-control methods.

The green groups that were suing cheered the BLM’s decision, saying the derby undercut the wolf population’s recovery.

“The public spoke loud and clear against this wildlife killing competition, and we are glad to see senior officials at the Department of the Interior ultimately respond to the public’s opposition by directing that the permit be withdrawn,” said Suzanne Stone, of Defenders, in a news release. “By denying the permit, BLM is supporting sound wildlife management practices as opposed to endorsing archaic killing competitions on our public lands that Americans so clearly oppose.”

“We’re so glad that the deadly derby has been canceled this year,” said Amy Atwood, senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “These sort of ruthless kill-fests have no place in this century. We intend to pursue every available remedy to stop these horrible contests.”

Alder said derby participants will have to sign a waiver saying any animals taken on public land won’t qualify for the derby. Idaho for Wildlife started the application process early, as BLM advised, he said.

He blamed the BLM’s D.C. office for revoking the permit and said his group will “push for more legislative oversight of this out-of-control agency that is now caving to the radical anti-hunters.”

Alder said the group again will offer two cash prizes. Excess money will be given to charities, including to support a rancher who, Alder wrote, lost most of his calves and 13 adult cows to wolves over the summer and may have to get a job at ShopKo to make ends meet.

The derby will be held Jan. 2 to 4.

Despite rumors, the Budweiser Clydesdales “will” appear in a Super Bowl commercial this year

Story By: as published in USA Today

“The story this morning may have left a wrong impression…”

screen-shot-2014-11-24-at-4-25-36-pmAfter a Monday morning story in the Wall Street Journal detailed a new marketing strategy for Budweiser that will focus more on “Jay Z and zombies” than the iconic American images normally associated with the brand, there was much worry that the company’s iconic Clydesdales would fade from the Super Bowl advertising landscape they’ve been a part of since 1986.

But fear not, lovers of the famed horses. Though a younger vibe will indeed be prominent in Anheuser-Busch advertisements in the future, the Clydesdales will continue to be featured in Super Bowl advertising in February.

“The story this morning may have left a wrong impression – the Budweiser Clydesdales will, in fact, be featured in next year’s Super Bowl advertising and are also a part of upcoming holiday responsible drinking advertising,” Anheuser-Busch said in a statement.

The company’s 2014 spot “Puppy Love,” embedded above, which featured a Clydesdale chasing after a departed canine friend, was the runaway winner of USA TODAY’s Super Bowl Ad Meter.

Another Clydesdale-inspired spot was named the winner in 2013.

Second Call for Nominations for BLM Wild Horse and Burro Special Interest Advisory Board

Forward by R.T. Fitch ~ president/co-founder Wild Horse Freedom Federation
Press Release – BLM.gov

“Well it appears that the BLM and Department of Interior just did not get enough horse slaughter, hunting and cattle proponents nominated to their horse hating advisory board so they are going out for a second round hoping for more horse eaters and sterilizers to come forward.  Last year, when they turned their back on Ginger Kathrens’ nomination, by a congressman no less, for the advocate position I lost all faith in anyone being able to make a difference on this board of wild horse and burro haters.  Several current members publicly and in print promote horse slaughter while others want to sterilize mares IN THE FIELD. 

The only ray of sunshine in this entire mess is that the BLM makes up their own rules as they go so they don’t even listen to the advice that their own special interest mouthpieces give…their program of managed extinction simply rolls on with a vengeance. 

Sadly, there may come a day when they won’t need the bunch of phonies anymore because there just simply won’t be any more wild horses and burros left to torture and maim.  Our public lands will be “multi-purposed” into oblivion and the sound of thundering hooves will be nothing more than a very distant and fond memory.  If we do not stop them and stop them soon, that picture will surely be painted.” ~ R.T.


Release Date: 11/18/14
Contacts: Tom Gorey, 202-912-7420

BLM Advisory BoardThe Bureau of Land Management today announced a second call for public nominations over a 30-day period to fill three positions on its national Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board.  To be considered for appointment, nominations must be submitted via email or fax by December 18, 2014, or postmarked by the same date. The BLM announced its second formal request for nominations in today’s Federal Register (November 18) at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2014-11-18/pdf/2014-27273.pdf.

Those who have already submitted a nomination in response to the first call for nominations (published in the Federal Register on August 29, 2014 (79 FR 51601)), do not need to resubmit.  All nominations from the first and second calls will be considered together during the review process.

Nominations are for a term of three years and are needed to represent the following categories of interest: wild horse and burro advocacy, veterinary medicine (equine science), and public interest (with special knowledge of protection of wild horses and burros, management of wildlife, animal husbandry, or natural resource management).

The Board advises the BLM, an agency of the Department of Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, an agency of the Department of Agriculture, on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies. The Board generally meets twice a year and the BLM Director may call additional meetings when necessary.  Members serve without salary, but are reimbursed for travel and per diem expenses according to government travel regulations.

The Advisory Board comprises nine members who represent a balance of interests. Each member has knowledge or special expertise that qualifies him or her to provide advice in one of the following categories: wild horse and burro advocacy; wild horse and burro research; veterinary medicine; natural resources management; humane advocacy; wildlife management; livestock management; public interest (with special knowledge of equine behavior); and public interest (with special knowledge of protection of wild horses and burros, management of wildlife, animal husbandry, or natural resource management).

Individuals shall qualify to serve on the Board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. They should demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the Advisory Board; individuals may also nominate themselves.  In accordance with Section 7 of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, Federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the Board.

For those interested, please submit a nomination letter and full resume. The following information must be provided: the position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered; the nominee’s first, middle, and last name; business and home addresses and phone numbers: e-mail address; present occupation/title and employer; education (colleges, degrees, major field of study); career highlights; qualifications: relevant education, training, and experience; experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management; experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management); and experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions. Applicants must also indicate any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by the nominee or his/her employer; indicate whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist; and explain why the nominee wants to serve on the Board. Also, at least one letter of reference from special interests or organizations the nominee may represent must be provided.

Nominations may be submitted by e-mail, fax, or regular mail. E-mail the nomination to stbohl@blm.gov.  To send by the U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street, N.W., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Sarah Bohl WO-260, Washington, D.C. 20240.   To send by FedEx or UPS, please send to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street, S.E., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Sarah Bohl, Washington, D.C., 20003. Or fax to Ms. Bohl at 202-912-7182. For questions, please call Ms. Bohl at 202-912-7263.

How do Horses Show Affection?

Original Essay by Franklin Levinson

“It’s ‘Feel Good Sunday’ and there is nothing that warms the soul more than talking about a little ‘horse huggin’.  Keep the faith, my friends.” ~ R.T.


Pele, Harley and R.T.Horses are extremely affectionate. If you get a chance to see them in the wild they are mutually grooming each other, scratching each other, leaning gently into each other, sharing breath with each other (a very intimate activity done by putting their noses together and sharing the air). These are all manifestations of affection. Mares and their foals are always nuzzling each other and the babies are always rubbing up against their moms. Sometimes they hang their heads over each other’s necks and gently hug with their necks. When a horse gently brings his head even slightly in your direction, it is affection and acknowledgement (unless you are holding a treat in your hand or pocket, then it is probably about the treat). The low, soft ‘nickering’ sounds they make at each other are other ways they show affection. However, love is the great carrot and the great treat. Real, unconditional love is the best form of affection and the greatest gift we can bring to our horses.

On the human end this is usually what occurs: We unconsciously reach into the animals face and want to pet and touch his muzzle (nose). If I reached into someone’s face and petted their nose, it would be rude, thoughtless and disrespectful. We do it to horses all the time. We think because he brings his head to us curiously checking us out that it’s OK to pet his nose. Or if he is sniffing us to investigate and get to know us that they are all right with us touching their faces. They do not have arms and hands and do not touch each other in this manner and, additionally, what we are doing is uninvited. We are touching their faces for us not for them. Most of the time they try to move their heads away from the oncoming hand, but to no avail. They react to the intrusion by moving their heads sideways or up and down. But we do not notice this reaction. We want to pet that soft nose and what we want takes all our attention, not the horse’s reaction to what we are doing. This is unfair and disrespectful to the horse.

When we reach into a horse’s physical space, no matter what, we stop its affection coming back towards us. Horses focus on one thing at a time. They are consciously either giving or receiving input, but not both simultaneously. So if the horse is trying to show us affection (which they really want to do) and we take it as an opportunity to input (touch or pet) them, we immediately stop their attempts at being affectionate towards us. This creates lop sided relationships with humans and horses where the human is always inputting the horse with what they think is affection. The horse, meanwhile, never really gets a chance to show it’s affection to the human. Stand and receive the horse’s affection. Keep your hands and arms down. Let them nuzzle you and gently bring their heads to you. Be still and quiet with your mind and body if you want to join with them. Empathize with the feelings you get from the horse. They live empathetic lives and look for that in their companions. Certainly you can put your arms around your horse and hug him, scratch him or reassuringly stroke him. He will get that you mean to be affectionate. But wait and do it when invited by the horse’s demeanor and body language.

When a herd leader wants to allow affection from another horse, she turns sideways and seemingly ignores that horse (goes about her business of grazing). She allows the other horse to approach her and show acknowledgement and affection. It may not involve actual physical contact. But, rather feelings of acknowledgement and acceptance shared and demonstrated through body gestures, postures and mutual awareness (empathy).

I encourage humans to be more like horses and perhaps understand that less is more with horses. By that I mean we could try not to be so forward with horses. We could try to make our desires requests rather than demands. We can chose to lead like Gandhi; lovingly, firmly and quietly. We could abandon leadership like Mussolini, with his loud, controlling, fear based dictatorship. I can now understand the kind of humans who only want to be with horses. There is no self-serving ego to deal with, nor trickery or dishonesty with the horse. There is not much drama either. The horse is impeccable and that’s a fact. They are honest, no matter what. They have personalities and disorders like we do but not the ego.

When your loved ones are affectionate with you know how it feels. It’s the same with horses. Loving touches are noticeable and stand out more than casual physical acknowledgement like hand shakes and pats on the back. Tune in to how you feel when your horse is showing you attention. Receive the attention/affection and just say ?Good Boy?. There is no need for anything else. You will both understand what has occurred. You will have been mutually affectionate as giving and receiving are actually the same thing.

If you are able to establish a great amount of mutual trust with your horse, this will lead to more affection and a stronger bond. Being a great parent/leader is a wonderful way to show affection for your horse. Being the great Mom or Dad for your horse means you are there for his feelings of safety and trust first and foremost. What kinder and more wonderful way to show affection than attention to another’s sense of well being. What is more affectionate than kindness? What feels more wonderfully loving than kindness? In the face of the most fearful and potentially dangerous horse, kindness is the major component in its rehabilitation (just as with an abused human). Giving your best is affection also. When your horse gives you his all and the best he’s got that is his affection coming straight to you.

I guess I could sum this up by merely saying; if it feels like affection and you are not holding a carrot, it probably is. Don’t try to figure the horse out too much. I think it is better to experience and empathize with how he feels. That is the real key.

Slaughter-horse hauler’s sentencing delayed

SOURCE:  WSMV.com

Reported by Nancy Amons

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A man who made his living shipping horses to slaughter in Mexico was in court Friday, but his punishment was delayed because of a hidden infusion of money.

This would have been the final chapter in the saga of Dorian Ayache, but there was a snag in his sentencing.

Ayache did not want to talk about his criminal case Friday, and he won’t learn his fate until January.

Ayache was the slaughter-horse hauler whose trucks overturned twice on the interstate, killing several horses.

Federal regulators cited Ayache for a long list of safety violations and for continuing to haul horses under a new company name, even after he’d been shut down by the government.

It turned out that most of the charges against Ayache couldn’t be criminally prosecuted. The case against him was falling apart.

Ayache appeared to be facing very little jail time, possibly even probation.

But Friday, Judge Aleta Trauger took a tougher stance. She was angry after learning Ayache inherited $300,000, but didn’t use any of the money to pay his fines.

Ayache owes the government about $36,000.

The federal prosecutor now wants Ayache to serve three months in prison. But because of the new information, the case was continued.

Trauger had some strong words for Ayache, saying even though the only charge that still stuck was a minor violation, she would consider his entire history.

“He is highly regulated by the government and he could care less what the government tells him to do,” Trauger said.