Call to Action: Please Comment to Stop the Dangerous and Cruel Adobe Town Wild Mare Radio Collar Study

by Carol Walker, Director of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation
Published on WildHoofBeats

“This herd is not even above AML by the BLM’s own count, only 648 adult horses in the flyover count in April 2016”

Adobe Town mare and foal - by Carol Walker

Adobe Town mare and foal – by Carol Walker

The BLM is planning to roundup wild horses in the Adobe Town Herd Management Area in 5 separate locations in order to put radio collars on 30-40 wild mares. The study will begin in December 2016 and end in 2020.

All the documents are here:

This study, which will be conducted by the University of Wyoming’s Department of Ecosystem Science and Management  has the following purpose:

“The Proposed Action is to implement a five (5) year research study (Appendix 1) that would document habitat selection, movement between habitats, seasonal use, and migration patterns of wild horses, within and outside of the ATHMA. The research objective is to understand how horses move across the Colorado-Wyoming border, how the removal of horses from the checkerboard portion of the HMA influences the movement of mares from non-checkerboard portions of ATHMA (i.e. creation of a void), how horses select landscape resources relative to their proportional availability, and how site fidelity of horses is influenced by season.”

Originally they were considering using bait trapping to capture the mares which would have much less chance of injuring or killing the horses than a helicopter roundup. They do not even discuss it as an option in the EA despite the response to the public’ comments to the Scoping Document which requested them to use this much less stressful and harmful method. Bait trapping also allows the family bands to be kept together, intact, much more easily.

The BLM dismisses very easily any impact on the wild horses that are rounded up using helicopters. Many will be injured and die, most will lose their families, foals will be separated from their mothers, and they will most likely be disrupted in a very substantial way from their normal areas and routines which DOES impact the outcomes of the study. Helicopter roundups use fear to drive the wild horses which is inhumane and also leads to extreme fear of helicopters.

This herd is not even above AML by the BLM’s own count, only 648 adult horses in the flyover count in April 2016.

My second biggest problem with this study is the use of radio collars which in past studies have led to injury and death when horses become entangled with brush or on fences or get a hoof caught. They say that they have remotely detonated release mechanisms on the collars so they can release the collar if the collar stops moving – but there are a tremendous number of questions that are unanswered:

  1. Why are they not using breakaway collars that break if the horses re in trouble, which have been used successfully before?
  2. How close to the collar does the person have to be to trigger the remote release mechanism?
  3. Does it work from say 70 miles away at the Rawlins BLM office or does the person have to be within view?
  4. What happens in winter when it is impossible to drive into the area?
  5. If they cannot drive into the area do they have the funds to charter a helicopter to fly over so they can detonate the remote release? If so, have they considered the stress upon the horses when a helicopter gets near them?
  6. Will it work when the temperatures get below -10 Fahrenheit? I was at a “gather” in Adobe Town in December 2013 when they released 40 wild mares and it was -19 degrees before I got to the highway.
  7. Does it hurt the horse when the release remotely “detonates?”
  8. What if the remote release fails? How can they help the mare that is in trouble?
  9. How often are they monitoring the collars to see if one has stopped moving? What about weekends?
  10. What about the reactions of the mare’s family members to this strange device now around her neck? What if she is rejected by the other horses because of it?

(They cite testing the collars at a short term holding facility, Palomino Valley. This is a completely different situation than the horses will face in the wild. Horses are not in families in holding facilities and there are not brush and fencing to get hung up on).

  1. Why can’t they use a small GPS under the skin? This would be so much safer and less intrusive for the mares. These “collars” are very old and low tech.

For all of these unanswered questions and because wild horses have been injured and died because of radio collars in previous studies:  I again suggest that they do NOT use radio collars but instead use Interns to follow, track, observe and photograph horses from specific areas.

This would remove the need for a helicopter roundup, which would provide far less stress and injury on the horses, and if would also provide more accurate data from people on the ground. Ten horses in Adobe Town are very colorful, and easily distinguished, so it would not be impossible to follow specific horses. It does not matter than some horses are less easy to find and see because if they have a few horses from each area, it does not matter which horses are less easily observed. If you round them up by helicopter this will be a complete disruption to the horses’ families and movement patterns. If you observe them without rounding them up you will obtain much more accurate data on where the horses are and move to.

My final argument is that this study is in no way, shape or form in the best interests of the horses. The researchers are seeking to prove that wild horses will “move into a void” created by rounding up and removing horses from the Checkerboard, so they can “prove” that it impossible to remove horses from the Checkerboard and keep them out. They are also hoping to “prove” that wild horses degrade riparian areas. There is no attempt to account for livestock grazing. They do not care about wild horse behavior or band fidelity, or they would use human observers. This cruel and dangerous study which is slanted toward proving that wild horses have no place on the HMAs in the Checkerboard should not be allowed to move forward. Since BLM has now formally withdrawn the 2016 Checkerboard Removal Decision Record – which was not the case at the time it issued the Draft EA – BLM should not move forward with the radio collar research because a major underlying premise (that 500+ wild horses would be removed from the Checkerboard before the radio collar research began) has now been eliminated.  In other words, the entire purpose behind this roundup was to see how horses move in response to a Checkerboard roundup; since there will be no Checkerboard roundup, there is no legal basis for the radio collar research as currently described in the Draft EA.

Please select alternative 2.2 No Action

This study is poorly conceived and planned and does NOT take the well being and humane treatment of the wild horses involved into proper consideration. This is not managing wild horses in the least invasive way possible, as they are mandated by the 1971 Free-Roaming Wild Horse and Burro Act. They should spend the next few months revising the study and if then they do decide to move forward they should use another capture method, which is bait trapping which they said they would discuss in the EA but failed to do. It is far more humane and will result in many less injuries and deaths. They should come up with a new EA including Bait Trapping or no rounding up at all but using direct observation as alternatives. And they should use a newer, safer  technology if they do wish to proceed with tracking the horses and eliminate the proposed use of radio collars.

The earliest they could start this roundup is December. They should not do it in December – it can get very cold, the horses are at greater risk of colic and injury when run in extremely cold temperatures. They should wait until next year in late summer or fall and address the questions that I have listed about the study and issue a new EA.

Please send your comments to the BLM here by November 1, 2016 at 4pm Mountain Time:

Wild Horse and Burro Specialist
Bureau of Land Management
Wyoming High Desert District
Rawlins Field Office
1300 North Third Street
P.O. Box 2407
Rawlins, Wyoming 82301
Fax: (307) 324-4224

Electronic comments must be sent to the following email address to be considered:

blm _ wy _ adobetown _

(Please include “Adobe Town EA Comment” in the subject line.)

From the BLM: Public comments are most helpful if they are specific. The regulations (40 CFR 1503.3), state that comments on a proposed action ‘ shall be as specific as possible and may address either the adequacy of the statement or the merits of the alternatives discussed or both.” The most valuable comments are those that cite specific actions or impacts in the document and offer informed analysis of what is presented.

Also, pleased do send personalized comments in your own words. The BLM will count all of the form letter comments as one, which is not helpful for the horses.

‘No Ambiguity:” Court Tells BLM It Cannot Treat Public Land as Private

by Arno Rosenfeld  as published on the Casper Star Tribune

The appeals court ruled that while the BLM claimed it was justified in treating the entire checkerboard as private, given the “unique land management situation” the agency lacked the authority to make this judgement.

Destruction of Wyoming's Adobe Town herd by the BLM ~ photo by Carol Walker of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Destruction of Wyoming’s Adobe Town herd by the BLM ~ photo by Carol Walker of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

The Bureau of Land Management may not treat public lands as private out of practical considerations, a federal appeals court wrote in an opinion released this week.

The 10th Circuit Court of Appeals issued an Oct. 14 ruling that concluded the BLM’s 2014 roundup of wild horses in the checkerboard region was illegal. Monday’s decision explained the court’s reasoning.

The judges wrote that the BLM violated the Wild Horses Act due to the difficulty of rounding up horses in the region, where public and private land alternate in one-square-mile plots in south-central Wyoming.

 “Its methodology was to treat public lands as private lands,” Judge Monroe McKay wrote in a concurring opinion. “But, though the BLM’s solution to the problem presented by the checkerboard may seem reasonable, it is not in accordance with the [law].”

The case originated in 2013 when the Rock Springs Grazing Association sued the BLM demanding the agency remove wild horses from their land in the checkerboard.

The BLM agreed to do so and determined the only way to keep horses off the grazing association land was to remove them from the public plots of land as well, given that the area is unfenced and horses move around on a daily basis.

But horse advocates sued the BLM claiming that while the agency can unilaterally remove horses from private land, it must go through an extensive review process before removing horses from public land.

A U.S. District Court in Wyoming initially sided with the BLM but the 10th Circuit decision overturned that ruling and agreed with the argument made by horse advocates.

 The appeals court ruled that while the BLM claimed it was justified in treating the entire checkerboard as private, given the “unique land management situation” the agency lacked the authority to make this judgement.

There is “no basis for BLM to construe the terms ‘privately owned land’ and ‘private lands’ to include the public land sections of the checkerboard,” the court wrote.

“[P]ractical realities do not provide BLM with the authority to construct the [Wild Horses] Act in a manner contrary to its plain and unambiguous terms.”

While the ruling released earlier this month halted the BLM’s checkerboard roundup planned for Oct. 18, Monday’s full opinion may set a precedent for similar cases around the West.

The groups that sued the BLM, including American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign and the Cloud Foundation, argued that the BLM’s actions in the checkerboard posed a wider threat to public land management.

If the BLM was allowed to treat public lands within the checkerboard as private for purposes of horse roundups, the groups argued the agency could also treat other public land as private if it helped them meet their land management objectives.

But the 10th Circuit decision may put this concern to rest.

“[T]here is simply no ambiguity in the terms ‘public lands,’ … and ‘private lands,’” the court wrote.

Hilary Wood, Pres. of Front Range Equine Rescue and Bruce Wagman (partner, Schiff Hardin law firm) on Wild Horse & Burro Radio (Wed., 10/26/16)


Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_LogoJoin us on Wild Horse Wednesdays®, Oct. 26, 2016

5:00 pm PST … 6:00 pm MST … 7:00 pm CST … 8:00 pm EST

Listen to the archived show  (HERE!)

You can also listen to the show on your phone by calling (917) 388-4520.

You can call in with questions during the 2nd half hour, by dialing (917) 388-4520, then pressing 1.

This show will be archived so you can listen to it anytime.


Hilary Wood is the President and Founder of Front Range Equine Rescue (FRER) and works as the Director of Programs and Operations.  Front Range Equine Rescue, founded in 1997, is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization working to prevent the abuse and neglect of horses through rescue and education.  In 2005, Front Range Equine Rescue launched its “Save the Wild Horses” campaign in direct response to the Burns Amendment.

Recently, Front Range Equine Rescue filed a lawsuit to stop the BLM’s plans to conduct surgical sterilization experiments on 225 wild horses, many in various stages of pregnancy, and potentially thousands of more horses over time.  FRER’s lawsuit contended that the BLM’s intended sterilizations would cause harm and suffering and were in violation of federal law.  Six weeks later, the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management withdrew its program to perform experimental sterilization of wild mares in Oregon.


Bruce Wagman is a partner with Schiff Hardin law firm in San Francisco, and has represented FRER in all of its legal horse work. Bruce has an almost exclusive animal law focus, involving litigation, education, legislative counseling, and consultation.  Bruce’s clients include numerous animal protection organizations and private individuals.  He is a co-editor of the casebook Animal Law, and coauthor of A Worldview of Animal Law.  He has been teaching Animal Law since 1996 and currently teaches at three Bay Area law schools.  In the past five years, Bruce has focused much of his time on issues involving wild horses, horse abuse cases, and the slaughter of American horses for food.


This show will be hosted by R.T. Fitch, President of Wild Horse Freedom Federation.

To contact us:, or call 320-281-0585


1/20/16 – Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, on BLM’s plans to sterilize wild horse and burros. Listen HERE.

1/27/16 – Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, on threats to shoot wild burros in Arizona. Listen HERE.

2/8/16 – Representatives of 4 major wild horse & burro advocacy groups and advocates speak out against BLM’s plans for barbaric sterilization experiments on wild mares. Listen HERE.

2/10/16 – Jonathan Ratner, Western Watersheds Project’s Director for Wyoming, Utah and Colorado, talks about the environmental toll of privately owned livestock grazing on public lands. Listen HERE.

2/24/16 – Kirsten Stade, Advocacy Director for Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER), on BLM’s skewed data minimizing the effects of livestock grazing on public lands. Listen HERE.

3/2/16 – Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, Equine Mgr. of Todd Mission Ranch (TMR Rescue) & founder of Wild Burro Protection League, joined by local wild burro advocates fighting to save the wild burros of the Black Mountain Herd Management Area in Arizona. Listen HERE.

3/23/16 – Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation interviews Susan W. Watt, Executive Director, Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary, located in South Dakota. Listen HERE.

5/4/16 – Gail A. Eisnitz, author of the book “Slaughterhouse” and Chief Investigator for the Humane Farming Association (HFA). Listen HERE.

6/22/16 – Charlotte Roe, Founder of Wild Equid League of Colorado, on BLM’s cruel experiments on wild horses and burros, including sterilization of pregnant wild mares, that are a launching pad for widespread use as “population suppression.” Listen HERE.

8/3/16 – Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, Equine Mgr. of Todd Mission Ranch (TMR Rescue) & founder of Wild Burro Protection League with guests. Listen HERE.

8/10/16 – Gene Baur, Pres. & Co-Founder of Farm Sanctuary, on factory farming and the Farm Sanctuary. Listen HERE.

8/17/16 – Advocates Carla Bowers and Bonnie Kohleriter on why 83% of wild horse and burro herds are on the brink of collapse. Listen HERE.

8/31/16 – Steve Hindi (President and Founder) and Janet Enoch (Investigator) of SHowing Animals Respect & Kindness (SHARK) on rodeo cruelty and more. You can see all of SHARK’s rodeo exposés on YouTube by clicking here. Listen HERE.

9/7/16 – Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation , on BLM plans to remove all wild horses from three of the largest remaining herds in Wyoming. Listen HERE.

9/14/16 – Susan Wagner, Pres. & Founder of Equine Advocates, on how the upcoming Presidential election can affect the fate of wild and domestic equines and horse slaughter. PLEASE SIGN EQUINE ADVOCATES’ PETITION HERE. Listen HERE.

9/21/16 – Mae Lee Sun, co-author of “Brumby: A celebration of Australia’s wild horses” and Craig Downer, wildlife ecologist and the author of the book “The Wild Horse Conspiracy” on the culling of the brumbies (wild horses) of the Snowy Mountains in New South Wales. Listen HERE.

9/28/16 – Laird Lucas (Executive Director) and Talasi Brooks (Staff Attorney) of Advocates for the West, a public interest, nonprofit environmental law firm with an 85% record of legal success protecting the wildlife and wild places of the American West. Listen HERE.

10/5/16 – Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, Equine Mgr. of Todd Mission Ranch (TMR Rescue) & founder of Wild Burro Protection League reports on the 2016 Donkey Welfare Symposium. Listen HERE.

10/12/16 – Nancy Watson, President of SAFE Food SAFE Horses Coalition, has been raising worldwide awareness to the loopholes in U.S. legislation that allows U.S. equines (horses, donkeys, mules and burros) which are laden with pharmaceuticals, into the global food supply. Listen HERE.












Baby Wild Horse Killed, Mutilated along Salt River AZ, Suspects Sought

Story by Monique Griego as published on Channel 12 TV

“They’re like family and to see something like this happen it just breaks your heart,”

MESA, Ariz. – A family of Salt River Wild Horses went from 9 to 8 members after one of the band’s youngest foals, a 6-month-old horse called Kai by local observers, was chased down shot and killed.

knxv-salt-river-horse“This is absolutely horrible to us, these horses are our family,” said Simone Netherlands, the president of the Salt River Wild Horses Management Group.

SRWHMG is a non-profit that tracks and watches over the various bands of wild horses in the area.

Netherlands says shots from what’s believed to be a shotgun also injured two other horses, and the horrific brutality didn’t end there.

“We can’t imagine who would do such a thing and the most horrible part of it is that the genitals were removed off of the dead horse,” she said.

Volunteers say someone mutilated Kai after the baby horse went down from multiple gunshot wounds, some to the head and neck.

READSuspect allegedly killed, mutilated Salt River horse

Another wild horse, named Dotty, was shot and killed near the Salt River around this same time last year.

“An animal you’re not going to eat, it’s not bothering you, it doesn’t attack you,” said volunteer Jake Jacobson.

“They’re like family and to see something like this happen it just breaks your heart,” said Mary Ann Jacobson, another volunteer with the management group.

Volunteers tracked the band of horses Monday night to check on the two also injured. The good news is that they seemed to be healing on their own.

The suspect is only described as a man, wearing a dark green shirt and black shorts or underwear. Witnesses told investigators he was with two other people.

The Maricopa County Sheriff’s office said Monday night it was mobilizing a mounted posse to look for evidence and investigate the shootings.

“It’s getting out of hand, they’ve got to stop this guy whoever it is,” said Jake.

Anyone with information on the case is asked to call MCSO. A reward is being offered for information leading to an arrest.

The Salt River Wild Horse Management group is trying to increase the reward money with a GoFundMe page.

Making Sense of Fort Polk Wild Horse Plan

as published on The Washington Times

“ideally there would be a way to find space for the horses within the 40,000 acres that the Army does not use for training.”

FORT POLK, La. – Horse advocates continue to raise questions and concerns about whether removing horses from Fort Polk is necessary, and about how it will be done.

fortpolkwildhorsesOne such group of advocates is the Pegasus Equine Guardian Association (PEGA). Its vice president, Pinckney Wood, said that “the goals of Pegasus are to preserve the wild horses that range on Fort Polk lands, and to prevent any of the horses from ending-up in the ‘slaughter pipeline.’ We have sought to do (this), while at the same time respecting the mission of Fort Polk and the Joint Readiness Training Center.”

Some of PEGA’s ideas to meet this goal include using herd management techniques to keep horses away from training areas, and fertility control methods to reduce the population.

In response to PEGA’s questions surrounding the number of horses on the Army base, which they think seems drastically inflated, Troy Darr, Public Affairs Officer on Fort Polk, said, “last year the estimate was 700 horses, so we assume it is a slightly higher number this year.” He pointed out that there had been a scientist on staff to perform the task of estimating how many horses are actually living on the land at Fort Polk. This type of assessment generally involves counting a measured part of the population, and then extrapolating the approximation of the entire population from that count.

PEGA has suggested that “ideally there would be a way to find space for the horses within the 40,000 acres that the Army does not use for training.” This solution includes using pens and fencing to keep horses away from training areas.

Of this, Colonel David “Gregg” Athey, Garrison Commander, said, “the land that we train on is very large; it’s very vast.” He pointed out that Fort Polk “just went through land purchase for 45,000 acres. “This was done to expand our training area,” he said, “because we have a deficit. The brigade combat teams we train are much larger than they used to be, therefore they require much more land. We also have our own brigade here and we have the responsibility to provide them with the training they require to maintain their readiness.”

Creating a horse sanctuary “would be taking a huge step backwards by giving up property that we just got, as authorized by Congress. It would be cost prohibitive,” stated the Garrison Commander.

PEGA has raised questions about sterilization of hours in the wild herd and suggested the horses could be relocated within the Kisatchie National Forest.

When asked about herd management via fertility control, referred to as “sterilization” in the PEGA blog, Col. Athey explained that the Army has partnered with the LSU Agriculture Department to assist in these endeavors and assure that they are taking proper care of the horses while administering a form of contraception called porcine zona pellucida, commonly known as PZP.

The American Wild Horse Preservation has pointed out that the FDA, The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and animal care committees all carefully review protocols for PZP use, and more than 20 years of data, carried out under these sets of rules, clearly show that wild horses are neither injured by the drug, nor do aberrational behaviors occur as a consequence of its application.

HSUS assures that the vaccine is used only to slow reproduction and may not be used for the extermination of entire herds. PZP is designed to bring about short-term infertility and is reversible, if not used beyond five consecutive years.

“The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) sees this type of fertility control as a way to reduce horse removals, to place fewer horses in short- and long-term holding facilities, and to achieve budgetary savings,” said Don Glenn, Acting Group Manager of the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program, Washington.

During the past two to three months LSU started utilizing PZP fertility control treatments on the Polk horses by “darting the females.” Athey explained that “the initial stage of this process was LSU coming to study the herds and identify behaviors. They advised us the best way to go forward is to treat the mares because if you sterilize the stallions it breaks down the social networks within the herds.” He said this is the first part of the implementation of the Course of Action (No. 7) selected by Brig. General Gary Brito to eliminate the horses from the post.

If horses must be removed in order to achieve the Army’s primary mission of providing superior training at Fort Polk, PEGA would like to ensure that the horses will be treated humanely and will be placed into caring hands, as opposed to being sold for slaughter, or other such inhumane treatment.

The horse advocates pointed to an article by Jerry Finch, a senior correspondent for Habitat for Horses, where he writes that horse slaughter schemes are often covered by a “set of fronts and organizations that make a monetary profit out of defending the existence of horse slaughtering, either directly or indirectly. It’s not about equine welfare, humanity, professionalism, or reliability.”

The worry is that a nonprofit may be a front for someone who feigns love of horses, but rather intends to sell them to slaughter for personal, monetary, gain.

The Garrison Commander said “this month we will be bating these animals into pens and that will start the full cycle.” This part of the process brings up PEGA’s interest in wanting to know what will happen next for these horses.

The Army’s chosen course of action determines that “the horses will be adopted, given away, sold, and relocated.” Specifically, in partnership with LSU, 25-35 horses at a time will be corralled into approximately two-acre lots. They will then be offered to 501(c)3, nonprofit organizations, who will take possession of the horses and administer an adoption program for private individuals.

One such group which has come forward to take some or all of the horses is the Humane Society of North Texas (HSNT), the largest and longest-standing nonprofit animal rescue and adoption organization in North Texas.

It serves over 25,000 animals annually through its various programs. HSNT’s mission, according to its website, is to “act as an advocate on behalf of all animals and ensure their legal, moral, and ethical consideration and protection.”

Col. Athey said HSNT “thinks they may be able to accommodate all of the horses and they will identify the right families to take them. That is what they do, and this is just a bigger project for them.”

PEGA has expressed concern regarding the intentions, and documented history, of inhumane behaviors of some organizations who have also expressed interest in participating in the process of removing horses from Fort Polk. Athey said, “if there is significant credible evidence supporting this kind of thing, we are going to do what’s right.” He said, if there is evidence, such as court documents, of potentially questionable treatment of horses by a nonprofit group, “we will present it to the Commanding General who will make the decision.”

From the point when the nonprofits take over, the Garrison Commander stated, “we count on these organizations to do the vetting” of individuals who intend to adopt horses.

Troy Darr said that HSNT “adopted out 700 horses last year and 600 horses the first half of this year.” Fort Polk is going to try to make available 200-250 horses per year.

Any horses which may remain will be offered to the general public on a first-come, first-serve basis. PEGA wants to ensure that whomever the horses end up with have good intentions for them, and that it can be guaranteed they will not be sold for slaughter or treated inhumanely in any way.

Darr explained that these individual citizens, who may or may not have an opportunity to take horses from Fort Polk, depending on how the process evolves with the nonprofits, “are not vetted. They are Americans who will have all the responsibilities and advantages of owning a horse. It’s not within our purview to supervise horses owned by the American people. We don’t have the legal authority to tell somebody what they can do with the horse. If someone breaks the law, once they’ve got the horse, that’s up to the sheriff, or the state police, or the FBI, and horse advocates” at that point.

PEGA also raised questions about whether it is ethical to remove “wild” horses from this land. Amy Hanchey, PEGA President said, “wild or not, we are humans and we are expected to be humane. The Army has a responsibility to the surrounding community and other people around the country.” She continued, “human life is paramount, but the horses also have a right to be treated well.”

Wood presented a 2004 joint resolution of the Louisiana House and Senate. Of this he said, “resolutions don’t have the weight of law. However they express the will of the Legislature, and as such, they ought to be taken seriously.” He continued, “it addressed the horse situation at Fort Polk, and was authored by State Representative Warren Triche during the 2004 Regular session of the Louisiana Legislature.”

To summarize, the joint resolution states that “there are hundreds of unclaimed, unbranded horses living in free-roaming bands on the pubic lands of … Fort Polk Military Reservation.” It continues, saying “the U.S. Army has effectively managed these wild animals for decades and has and should retain the authority to continue to do so in a manner that is best for the well-being of the animals.”

One portion of the joint resolution mentions that the Environmental Assessment (EA) developed by the Army must regard “the wild horses that roam freely on the lands in Kisatchie National Forest used by the Army as training areas;” Col. Athey said Fort Polk does not own or train on National Forest land.

There has been no DNA testing done on these particular horses on Fort Polk, but Col. Athey said “we rely on what the courts have already determined,” and that is “these are not protected animals. These are feral animals and they have been abandoned,” which is why they have been deemed “trespass” horses.

Horses which are qualified and determined to be labelled as “trespass,” are not protected under the Wild and Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971.

Colonel Athey said the nonprofits, mainly the Humane Society of North Texas, will begin claiming horses at the end of this month. He stated that they “are doing this in manageable numbers.” It is expected that this process will take about two to three years, within continuous reassessment of the process, with adjustments made as needed.

Athey reiterated that “removing the horses from Fort Polk is for the safety of the soldiers and horses, the maintenance of the integrity of the JRTC program, and the prevention of damage to equipment.”

PEGA and other horse advocate groups maintain an important role in this process, ensuring that the horses have advocates who will speak for them and work to ensure that they are treated humanely in any and all contexts.

Feel Good Sunday: “Just Like Them Horses”

Story by By Laura McClellan, forward by R.T. Fitch

“It’s Feel Good Sunday and time to lift ourselves up in preparation for another week of intensive warfare, be it fighting to survive on the job, struggling for ways to keep horses and burros on the range and free of slaughter or just getting through the evening news…we need strength.

Often, here, we laugh and slap each other on the back in an effort to bolster ourselves up and prepare for that slide out of the bed on Monday morning but it is also important to remember that many times it is necessary to look deep within prior to looking forward and out upon the horizon of life, and today we do just that.

The link to this video was sent to me by someone who works quietly behind the scenes, here, at Straight from the Horses Heart as many do because this is a community and not a one man show.  During the week she sends me various links to newsworthy stories and always throws in a few FGS (Feel Good Sunday) stories for good measure.  Her assistance has freed up much of my early morning time and allowed me to write more frequently versus searching for the latest and greatest to share…today is a case in point and after watching this video, I am both moved and anxious to step out the door of the house with my little boarder collie assistant and get to cooking breakfast for the horses, our equine children.  I am blessed to, now, spend each and every daybreak with our horses, Roxy my canine keeper, the Koi and even our little monarch butterfly community where we are on our 4th batch of baby caterpillars this season.  The quiet beauty, the deep feeling of connection and retrospective look back gives me strength, centers my soul and propels me forward into the harsh daylight of the intense and often times stressful day.

Sit back, breath deeply, wrap the lyrics of show business’s most delightful woman around you and claim this day to be your own, you most assuredly deserve it.  Peace to you, my friends.” ~ R.T.

Reba McEntire‘s “Just Like Them Horses” video is an emotional tribute to her late father, Clark McEntire, who passed away in 2014. The black-and-white scenes begin with a somber monologue from McEntire herself, asking tough questions in the wake of her father’s death: “How do you say goodbye? How do you say goodbye to somebody who made you, raised you, taught you, disciplined you, loved you? How do you say goodbye?” she says before the music comes in.

The ballad begins with just piano and McEntire’s powerful, emotive vocals as the video shows the artist walking through farm land alone reflecting, alternating with scenes of beautiful horses as well as McEntire’s own real-life mom driving a truck to meet her daughter.

“Mama had to be in the video. She was and still is the glue to our family,” McEntire said of the decision to include her mom. The scenes even took place on the McEntire family farm. “We shot the entire video in Chockie, Okla. on the McEntire home-place. Those old hills mean a lot to me. I lived there 21 years and they still call me back time after time.”

Written by Tommy Lee James and Liz Hengber, McEntire heard the song when choosing tracks for her Love Somebody album and decided to have it played at her father’s funeral.

“The minute I heard it, I knew I wanted it played at Daddy’s funeral. When my producer Tony Brown heard it, he loved it so much, that he insisted on putting it on the album,” she said.

McEntire says she dedicates the music video to her father, as well. It ends with several images of majestic horses running on the farm and the artist riding away on the back of the truck from earlier in the song. A photo memorial of her father appears over the last scene as a dedication.

Love Somebody is McEntire’s 27th studio album, released in April 2015. It debuted at No. 1 and has since sold more than 180,000 copies. “Just Like Them Horses” is the third single from the record, following “Going Out Like That” and “Until They Don’t Love You.”

Read More: Reba McEntire Honors Late Father with Video for “Just Like Them Horses” |

Whatever They are Called, Fort Polk Horses are Wild

as published on the Beauregard Daily News

“There are in fact several unique herds of truly wild horses that are of value both environmentally and culturally, especially to the inhabitants of the area, but also to all Americans. …”

Regarding the articles about the Ft. Polk Horses:

The title of the most-recent article, “Making Sense of Fort Polk Horses Plan”, implies that the plan makes sense.

fort-polk-horsesWhile it is true that there are abandoned horses at Ft. Polk, there are also in reality herds of Wild Horses on the Fort Polk / Kisatchie lands, regardless of the label “trespass horses” that Ft. Polk placed upon all of the horses, not just the abandoned ones. Ft. Polk spokespersons always accentuate their claim that all of the horses are “trespass horses” by pointing to a court decision that happened about 15 years ago.However, the Wild Horse and Burro Act of 1971 was implemented for the purpose of preservation and protection of wild horses, Congress uses the term “unbranded and unclaimed” in reference to what distinguishes wild horses on the ranges where they existed prior to 1971. Unfortunately, an appeal from a humane organization to have the wild horses recognized as “wild” under the 1971 law resulted in an unfavorable decision by the court, in part because of misinformation from the government’s side and insufficient evidence to the contrary. However, today there is sufficient evidence based upon historical documentation, physical appearance, location, and behavior of the herds of wild horses.

There are in fact several unique herds of truly wild horses that are of value both environmentally and culturally, especially to the inhabitants of the area, but also to all Americans. They should be preserved and protected. Wild horses are wild horses by their nature, regardless of what label some want to put on them. The wild horses that survive today may be regarded as “feral” by some, however, the fact that horses were domesticated before they were reintroduced back to the North American continent matters little from a biological nor welfare standpoint. Regardless if the horses are abandoned, Generationally Wild or otherwise Wild, their welfare is at stake.

Pegasus would like to express the difference between herd management methods when discussing Wild Horses vs. Domesticated Horses. The domestic horse mentality uses the term “Sterilization” which implies gelding of stallions and/or ovariectomy of mares. These methods of sterilization have been shown to be detrimental to the health and nature of these horses, and are never recommended as solutions for Wild Horses. So what can be done?

Fertility Control is an option that can be successful, if administered responsibly, using methods and practices that are consistent with its recommended use to perpetuate healthy herds with genetic viability and diversity.

There is a significant likelihood that horses being removed run the risk of being sent to slaughter. We have received several statements that both federal and state officials have actually reached out to known Kill Buyers offering to make deals for removal. This lack of serious concern will surely result in the horses going to slaughter.

Slaughter is what happens to the majority of “unwanted” horses in this country as shown by the Animal Welfare Institute, 2015 Horse Slaughter Statistics, approx. 125,000 American horses were sent to a brutal, inhumane, terrorizing death last year. The term, Kill Buyer, is a commonly used term to describe those who profit from buying and selling horses for slaughter and these individuals are fixtures at horse sales (commonly referred to as Auctions, Sale Barns or Feed Lots).

“The journey to this cruel death is preceded by horrendous handling and transport methods. This process often includes the horses being shipped from auction to auction, in scorching heat or freezing blizzards and are deprived of food, water and rest. They are not separated by gender, age, size, or degree of aggressiveness. These trailers, designed with lower ceilings for cattle, prevent the horses from holding their heads upright during transport, which often causes them severe head, neck and limb injuries. During transport and at the slaughterhouse, eyes are often poked out on unruly horses. In some Mexican regional plants, horses are not rendered unconscious during the killing process but are merely immobilized by being stabbed repeatedly with a sort of dagger called a “puntilla” in the back of the neck to break the spinal cord. The excruciatingly painful, horribly bloody stabbing neither kills nor renders unconscious; it merely incapacitates the horses, making them the equivalent of tetraplegic, before they are hoisted, whereupon their throats are slit and their bodies are dismembered. During the entire process, the horses in Mexico are fully aware. [The foregoing paragraph is from an article by Jerry Finch, Habitat for Horses.] Since we know that the horse market is already flooded with healthy horses, we can assert that the minute the horses enter the horse market their risk for ending up in auctions and eventually slaughterhouses increases substantially.”

– Jerry Finch, Habitat for Horses. [Please see: for Internet links to the 5 article series on horse slaughter.]

While we applaud attempts by organizations to assist, we have serious concerns. It is difficult to believe that the Humane Society of North Texas, an organization that says they would take all of the horses, could have placed, with success, 100 horses per month so far this year, as the article indicates. In comparison, many of the BLM placed horses ended-up at slaughter, and the BLM has taken serious precautions to prevent it (e.g., freeze branding horses in a conspicuous and unalterable way). The BLM has approximately 55,000 horses and 11,000 burros that they have been taking from public lands and have been keeping (for years) in holding facilities awaiting adoption.

“In light of the thousands of wild horses and burros that the federal government wants to remove from the range in Nevada and elsewhere, it would be irresponsible for the Department of Defense to move forward without a long-term, humane management plan for the Ft. Polk horses. We respectfully urge the Army to partner with local organizations to create and implement a humane management plan, using safe, proven fertility control, to reduce the number of horses over time..”

– Neda DeMayo, nationally known wild horse expert: President, Return to Freedom (Wild Horse Preservation, Education & Sanctuary); and Founder, American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, a coalition of organizations dealing with current wild horse crisis issues.

The article concluded with a paragraph that implied everything will be “OK” because animal advocates will be looking out for the horses. This is very misleading. Ft. Polk has already said they will be doing nothing with regard to following-up on the horses that leave Ft. Polk. The end result is that the horses will be in jeopardy as a result of the Ft. Polk “plan”.

Pegasus would like to see a partnership between governing organizations, wild horse preservation groups, advocates and citizens. It is believed many of the Military’s safety concerns could be addressed as well as acting in the best interest of the horses and enhancing public relations. We feel the Army’s plan falls short. Here are some examples of what horse welfare advocates would like to see; a horse registry, low-stress handling, and non-permanent fertility control while maintaining the uniqueness of the Wild Horse herds. Also their plan has no mention of what governing authorities will do about the in ability to enforce basic animal abandonment laws, which is a problem that will only continue unless addressed. It is important to realize that partnerships like this do exist and are successful; for example North Dakota Badlands Horses in Theodore Roosevelt National Park is an excellent example for Louisiana to follow. Please check them out.

So If you feel the same sense of concern as we do, you should make those concerns known to Fort Polk as well as Local and Federal Government Officials. Pegasus hopes to encourage citizens to find ways to preserve the wild horses, and take a sensible & low-stress approach to managing the unique horse herds in Kisatchie and Fort Polk.

Hanchey can be reached through



Story by Grandma Gregg

Privately owned welfare cattle being herded onto public land and wild horse habitat DURING a BLM roundup at Antelope Complex, NV. ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Privately owned welfare cattle being herded onto public land and wild horse habitat DURING a BLM roundup at Antelope Complex, NV. ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

The Bureau of Land Management announced its Rangeland Stewardship Awards for 2016 and gave the awards to welfare ranchers. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported the federal government spends at least $144 million each year managing private livestock grazing on federal public lands, but collects only $21 million in grazing fees—for a net loss of at least $123 million per year.

The Rangeland Stewardship-Permittee Award went to the Mori Ranch in Tuscarora, Nevada

USDA subsidy information for Mori Ranches LLC

Mori Ranches LLC received payments totaling $464,477 from 1995 through 2014


USDA subsidy information for Mori Ranches LLC

Mori Ranches LLC received payments totaling $140,486 from 1995 through 2014

The Sage-Grouse Habitat Stewardship-Permittee Award went to the Drewsey Ranch in Burns, Oregon

USDA subsidy information for Drewsey Field Ranch Company

Drewsey Field Ranch Company received payments totaling $243,900 from 1995 through 2014

Castrated, Captive, Former Wild Horses Now Roam Power Ball Winner’s Land

Unedited story by Seth Tupper as published on

“The BLM’s propaganda war against wild horses and burros continues in the unedited article below.  It contains inaccurate numbers, hints on sending the horses to slaughter AND the livestock company “Spur Livestock” who managed this move were caught by Wild Horse Freedom Federation selling wild horses to known kill buyers, click (HERE), which the Feds swiftly swept under the carpet.  If you are still a little qweezy from watching last night’s presidential debate, reading this article first thing in the morning is not going to improve the status of your upside down stomach.  Let the reader beware.” ~ R.T.

photo - Chris Huber

photo – Chris Huber

NEWELL | As an illustration of the lengths the federal government must now go to manage all the wild horses under its care, it doesn’t get much more telling than this: In South Dakota, a Powerball jackpot winner is now getting paid to let the government’s horses roam his land.

On Tuesday, officials of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management showed off the roughly 50 square miles of grassland where a herd of 917 newly transferred wild horses will graze for years to come.

The land is about 25 miles east of Newell, or about 75 miles northeast of Rapid City. The property is owned by Neil Wanless of South Dakota, who bought it with the proceeds of a $232 million Powerball jackpot he won in 2009 (he opted for a lump-sum payment and took home $89 million after taxes.)

Wanless, who is preternaturally averse to media attention, did not attend the tour that was staged for the media Tuesday. His ranch manager, Adam Karrels, attended in his stead.

“He likes his privacy,” Karrels said.

Wanless’ privacy is further protected by his private arrangement with Spur Livestock LLC, which has a registered address in Midland and is owned by South Dakota ranchers Jim Reeves and Lyle Anderson. The government pays Spur Livestock a varying rate of around $2 per head, per day, to ensure that the horses are fed, watered and kept relatively wild and free-roaming. Spur Livestock, in turn, has a private deal with Wanless to keep the horses on his land.

Spur Livestock has another contract for 400 BLM wild horses kept on land near Eagle Butte. During the past fiscal year, the company was paid a total of about $1 million by the federal government, according to the government website

The pastures managed by Spur Livestock are known as “off-range pastures,” because they are home to excess horses culled from the free-roaming herds on vast BLM ranges in places such as Nevada, Wyoming and Oregon.

The BLM has about 67,000 horses on wild ranges, which BLM officials say is 40,000 more than the ranges can support. Some of the excess horses are adopted, but those that are not adopted must be kept somewhere. Increasingly, those horses are being sent to off-range pastures.

There are now 32,000 wild horses in 28 off-range pastures like the two operated by Spur Livestock, and the BLM is adding five more off-range pastures this year. Another 12,000 excess BLM horses are waiting in holding corrals, bringing the total number of off-range horses under the BLM’s care to nearly 45,000.

During the 2015 fiscal year, the federal government paid the owners and operators of all those off-range corrals and pastures $49 million.

The BLM has little choice but to keep all of its horses alive and well, because of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act approved by Congress in 1971. The law grew out of concern about the widespread roundup and slaughter of wild horses in the American West. It now prevents the killing of wild horses on BLM land and some other federal lands in all but a few limited circumstances, such as when horses need to be euthanized because of their old age, lameness or sickness.

Some wild horses on non-BLM federal lands are not protected by the 1971 law, and when those horses grow to unsustainable numbers, they’re often adopted or rescued by private sanctuaries. That’s how the International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros near Lantry accumulated many of its 810 horses, which were impounded recently by county authorities after allegations surfaced of starving horses on the society’s ranch. BLM officials on Tuesday’s tour stressed that there is no connection whatsoever between the private Lantry sanctuary and the BLM wild-horse program.

The BLM is trying to stem the growth of its wild herds with ongoing research into population-control methods, including a fertility control vaccine. Meanwhile, the agency has few options but to keep culling wild horses from the ranges and expanding the off-range pasture program. In September, when a BLM advisory board voted to recommend selling or euthanizing some of the off-range horses, it sparked a public outcry and led the BLM to issue assurances that it would not act on the recommendation.

The Wanless land is one of the newest off-range pastures. The wild horses that occupy it were formerly kept on a large ranch near Fort Pierre until the ranch was sold and Spur Livestock lost its lease. Reeves and Anderson needed a new home for the herd and connected with Wanless, who issued a statement through the South Dakota Lottery after his 2009 Powerball win that said, in part, “I just want to go home and ranch and ride horse and check cows.”

There are still some cattle on the Wanless ranch near Newell, but 33,000 of the ranch’s 42,000 acres are now available to the wild horses. They will be moved around to various parts of the ranch throughout the year to avoid overgrazing, and they’ll drink from dams and from a system of pipes and tanks that Wanless installed to bring water from the Belle Fourche River.

Other than that, the horses will basically live free until death. The average age of the horses on the Wanless land is 15 to 17 years, and some are as old as 34. As older horses die, more horses will be brought in, up to a maximum of 1,022 horses at any given time.

All of the horses are geldings, having been castrated upon their removal from the wild ranges. Some other off-range pastures contain only mares, and none have studs.

Not everyone has welcomed the horses. A neighboring landowner to the Wanless ranch, Sharon Herron, has appealed the BLM environmental assessment that allowed the herd to be transferred. That appeal will be heard by the federal government’s Interior Board of Land Appeals and could result in anything from a rejection to an order to remove the horses.

The BLM has tried to address one of Herron’s concerns by installing double-fencing along her border with the Wanless ranch, thereby providing extra insurance against wild horses roaming onto Herron’s land. But she has expressed numerous other concerns, including the cost of the wild-horse program to taxpayers. She thinks policies should change to allow some wild horses to be sent to slaughter.

“The underlying problem is that the USA does not have a slaughter plant to properly dispose of live horses and to market horse byproducts,” Herron has written.

One affected party that seems greatly pleased with the move to the Wanless ranch is the horses themselves. As reporters looked on Thursday, the animals spread across Wanless’ sweeping, scenic grassy and treeless plains, some of them becoming barely visible specks after crossing only a fraction of their new home. About 40 miles to the southwest loomed the unmistakable form of Bear Butte, and behind it stretched nearly the entirety of the Black Hills, with mountaintops such as Crow Peak, Terry Peak and Black Elk Peak clearly visible.

Debbie Collins, an Oklahoma-based national marketing and outreach specialist for the BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program, marveled at the landscape.

“It’s not such a bad place to hang out,” she said, “if you’re not on the range.”

BLM Mouthpiece Rides Again: Protected Wild Horses and Burros be Damned

“In MY most outraged opinion” ~ R.T. Fitch

“Poison bleeds from the pen of the uninformed…”

david_philippsLike the distant scent of something rotting in the sun the stench of an alleged journalist, under the manipulation of the federal government, has returned to ensure that cruelty and misinformation about wild horses and burros will be spread in the biased, mainstream media, again: enter David Philipps, stage left. (YeeHaa, the little nerd has returned)

You remember Philipps, the cocky, wet-behind-the-ears, reporter wanna-be who blew out of the water an intensive underground investigation into the BLM selling wild horses and burros to slaughter back in 2012, cause he wanted a “scoop”? ( Yup, dat’s the creep…and he is back.)

In 2012 Philipps wrote an article on Tom Davis, neighbor and personal buddy of then Secretary of the Department of Interior Ken Salazar, selling over 1,700 federally protected wild horses off to slaughter…the problem with the expose’ was that it was too little too early as equine advocates had Davis and Salazar dead to rights and before they could adequately pull the documentation together to legally nail the wild equine killers Philipps blew the whistle and the paper trail to legal prosecution evaporated. Advocates had pled with Phillips to hold the info in check but it is a lesson learned that “loose lips sink ships” is a valid phrase that works as well in this war of words as it did back in the World War. Philipps is in it for Philipps. (Look at ME, Look at ME!)

"I'm going to kick your ass, boy!" ~ Salazar

“I’m going to kick your ass, boy!” ~ Salazar

The only good thing that came from Philipps vomiting up crucial evidence against kill buyers was that it pissed off the Chief Horse Killer himself, Ken Salazar, enough that he made the, oh my gosh, mistake of threatening to kick the little creep’s ass in public and not long afterwards he was no longer the Secretary of one of our government’s most corrupt agencies. (So sorry ya ain’t missed…oppps, he works for Hillary now as her transition team lead, yikes.)

Now the little sellout has ridden back onto the scene astride his keyboard of misinformation to paint for the public a story of fabricated frustration for the downtrodden leadership of the BLM and the “woe is me” poor cattle ranchers who house wild horses on their land, instead of cows, while making 5 figures a day for doing so. (Guess who is paying THAT bill, yup, tis you my friend.)

Last week Philipps latest installment in attempting to destroy the last of our wild horses and burro’s freedom was entitled, “Success Spoils a U.S. Program to Round Up Wild Horses” and appeared in the New York Times. (Wow, the Times, why can’t I get anything in the Times. Oh, yeah, we write the truth, that was a no brainer.)

The title alone drips with “suck-upidness” (new word I just invented) and immediately alerts a self-actualized reader that the facts and content will be slanted; as in downhill and south to the feds. (Doink, no need to read further.)

"I is a Pickle!" ~ Bolstad

“I is a Pickle!” ~ Bolstad

The article begins with BLM wild horse program’s lead, Dean Bolstad, pushing back his ole cowboy head and saying “ I love seeing this,” (horses in holding) while lamenting on how the horses are sinking his program. (This is the federal employee who laid the groundwork, and whispered in the ears of the Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, to KILL and MURDER all of the horses that are in holding…pure, unadulterated bull crap!)

And this good ole boy, who refers the 6th grade as his “senior” year, goes on to say that he and his crones have successfully removed 46,000 wild equines from their rightful range only to plunk then down on 60 private cattle ranches to the tune of $49 million dollars a year…duh.

“We’re in a real pickle,” he continues. Hey, you are not in a real pickle, you ARE the real pickle because it is obvious that your mind is either infused with large amounts of vinegar or embalming fluid as this is a trumped up artificial fiscal emergency of YOUR OWN MAKING you twit. (I know that I am shouting insults but this article is so riddled with stupid that it is difficult to get from one sentence to the next.)

Case in point, Philipps gets a private tour of a secret long term holding contractor, Robert Hughes, in Oklahoma. When was the last time an advocate got a private tour and poor old Bobby says he has, allegedly, 4,000 horses on his land and only making 2 bucks a day for his lack of effort. WHAT, 8 thousand a day for horses grazing…10 days that is 80 thousand and for a month your looking at almost a quarter of million!  (I feel sooo sorry for Bobby. Life is a bitch and then you profit from the feds, I know it is rough but someone has to do it.)

Next ole Philipps interviews two of the newest members of the BLM’s special interest advisory board who voted to KILL all of the horses. “Oh, the devastation to the range is so severe that something has to be done,” they read from their scripts but even the idiot article dummy downs the numbers to confess to the fact that wild equines are out numbered by federally subsidized welfare cattle at the conservative ratio of 10 to 1.

Did you get that? Private, government subsidized cattle out number protected wild equines to the tune of 10 to 1 (they let that slip, must have been a mind fart)…and the range is being overgrazed by horses and burros? And, to add injury to insult, the government pays millions of dollars to take the small number of horses off from their rightful range to put them where, on CATTLE RANCHES.

Is it just me or is there an easy fix, here? Shouldn’t we let the small herds of horses stay on the range, at zero cost, and put cattle on the cattle ranches, again at no cost, and everyone comes out a winner? Oh, stupid me, it is all about double dipping and the welfare ranchers making money on both ends of the stick. Graze on public land for next to nothing and making big money putting former wild horses on your cattle ranch.  (it’s a win/win, honey.)

But Philipps does not see it, he rambles on with poison quotes and incorrect numbers with only a few conciliatory comments from advocates. More mainstream misinformation to the public and the scariest point of all this is that the public believes it. “Well it was in the Times and on the Internet wasn’t it? It’s gotta be true!”

So the war against wild horses and burros rages on as the government, cattle ranchers and their journalistic stooges collude to rid, kill and destroy the few remaining viable herds that still exist on our public lands. (Philipps is a war correspondent by trade, and it shows, here.)

How do we fight back, you ask? Stay informed, stay vigilante and tell everyone that you know about the Fed’s mission to destroy the horses and burros on behalf of their special interest bedfellows. And above all, be certain to inform them not to believe everything that they read as much of it is delivered by henchmen like Philipps who wouldn’t know what an original idea was if it hit him alongside the head.

Ride on, Davey, and take your BLM buddies with you as nothing would make the equine advocates of the world happier than to see the whole lot of you ride off into the sunset, for good.

See ya, wouldn’t wanna be ya!!!!

R.T. Fitch is a author, blogger and out spoken equine advocate who is noted for having no opinion on anything of consequence; as is evident, here