Feel Good Sunday: MustangMedia 101 – Whose Home on the Range?

By Terri Farley

Helping Wild Horses and Burros

terri-farley1. KNOW THE FACTS

You’ll feel comfortable telling people what’s happening to wild horses and burros if you know what you’re talking about.

Check out these websites for news, statistics and resources. If you are working on a wild horse or burro report, these are good sites to visit.

American Wild Horse Preservation
The Cloud Foundation
Chilly Pepper – Miracle Mustang, Equine & Neonatal Mustang Rescue
Hidden Valley Wild Horse Protection Fund
The Wild Horse Sanctuary
Wild Horse Freedom Federation
Wild Burro Protection League
Return to Freedom Wild Horse Conservation
Lifesavers Wild Horse Rescue
Montgomery Creek Ranch

2. WHAT’S HAPPENING RIGHT NOW?

Websites can’t cover every single news story about wild horses and burros, but you can create a Google alert for wild horses and burros. Here’s how.

Pay attention to these alerts to see where your voice is needed before the damage is done to your mustangs!

3. Forward this to those who care or need to be educated about wild horses:

Forward this to those who care or need to be educated about wild horses and burros:

ANNOUNCING MustangMedia 101 by Terri Farley: Whose Home on the Range?

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Wild horses and burros can’t speak their own stories. Once, that didn’t matter, but now wild horses and burros suffer and die at human hands. We take their food, water and homes. A few people want wild horses and burros taken off public lands so corporations can earn money from the land’s minerals, oil and grazing. But most people love wildlife and wild places. They’re learning to stand up for wildlife because the Western public lands belong to all Americans! Our hearts lift at their rough power and beauty.

Knowing mustangs inspires me to tell their stories as well as I can, before they’re extinct.

MustangMedia 101 by Terri Farley is my attempt to explain modern challenges facing wild horses and burros.

4. FOUR FILL-IN-THE-BLANK STEPS TO MAKE A LETTER-IN-WAITING

When you see an opportunity to comment about wild horses and burros online or in person, do it! For short Facebook or Twitter comments, use only Step One. For letters to editors, blogs, letters to government representatives, use all 4 steps.

STEP ONE: Make a statement and use BECAUSE to back it up.

EX:

“Wild horses and burros deserve freedom because laws have given them the right to roam public lands.”

or

“Wild horses and burros belong to all Americans and, because most American don’t believe in eating horsemeat, mustangs and burros shouldn’t go to slaughter.”

STEP TWO:

• Describe your personal connection to the issue in 2 – 3 sentences.

STEP THREE:

• Give 3 facts about the issue — 1 – 3 sentences

STEP FOUR:

• WHAT ACTION do you want people to take? – 1 sentence

That’s it! In 3 – 6 sentences, you will have explained why you want to live in a world with wild horses and burros.

You can keep that short document as a letter-in-waiting, but whatever you do — put your opinion out there!

You don’t have to be brave or brilliant; you just have to speak up for those who can’t speak for themselves.

South Dakota State’s Attorneys File Motion Seeking to Transfer Control of At-Risk Wild Horses

Source: Fleet of Angels

“If the motion is approved, the wild horses would be placed in safe homes rather than sold at auction…”

black-stallion

A Black Stallion stands, snow encrusted, in sub-zero temps. with no shelter at ISPMB facility in Landry, SD

The South Dakota state’s attorneys in Ziebach and Dewey Counties have filed a motion requesting that a judge transfer to two equine welfare organizations control of 540 wild horses found starving and neglected at the International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros in Lantry, S.D.

Filed in the Fourth Circuit Court of Ziebach County, the motion requests that management and placement of the horses be turned over to Fleet of Angels, an organization that provides emergency assistance and transportation to at-risk equines in the United States and Canada, and Habitat for Horses, an equine rescue based in Texas.

If the motion is approved, the wild horses would be placed in safe homes rather than sold at auction, where they could fall into the hands of kill buyers who would transport them to Canada or Mexico for slaughter. This would be one of the largest known equine rescue and adoption efforts in U.S. history.

Fleet of Angels has already received a large number of applications for the horses. During the adoption process, the horses would be placed in a variety of approved homes, sanctuaries and rescues. Options to keep some of the herds as intact as possible are also being pursued.

The court filing follows a unanimous vote on Dec. 22 by the South Dakota Animal Industry Board to recommend to the court that the horses at ISPMB be turned over to another animal organization or group of organizations in order to allow adoptions to continue.

In mid-October, State’s Attorney Steve Aberle asked Elaine Nash, Executive Director of Fleet of Angels, to conduct a national adoption campaign with the initial goal of placing one third of the 810 ISPMB horses. By Christmas, Fleet of Angels member Palomino Armstrong and team had gathered, sorted, and loaded the currently allowed limit of over 270 horses onto adopter’s trailers for their trips to safe new homes, despite difficulties caused by especially harsh winter weather. The Wild Horse and Burro Sanctuary Alliance helped supply hay, and generous contributions by Victoria McCullough made purchasing hay, needed panels and other critical materials possible.

On Dec. 10, a consortium of animal welfare organizations reached an agreement with the state’s attorneys in Ziebach and Dewey Counties that averted a planned auction of the remaining wild horses, to give them every chance possible at avoiding slaughter and reaching a good home.

County officials and the state Animal Industry Board approved the agreement.

The counties had planned to auction the horses to recoup the costs they had incurred. The auction would have taken place on Dec. 20 in Faith, S.D., but the participating animal welfare groups established a fund that would reimburse the counties instead. Participating organizations will continue to raise funds for the care and feeding of the horses during the second phase of the adoption process.

Return to Freedom will work with Fleet of Angels and Habitat for Horses to ensure that suitable homes for the horses are found. Return to Freedom, an organization known nationally for its work with wild horses, will be working to facilitate the placing of whole herds when possible, helping ensure that many family bands are kept together, and that stallion groups are placed responsibly.

fleet-of-angelsFleet of Angels and Habitat for Horses will work together with Return to Freedom will work together to ensure that suitable homes are found for the horses. Return to Freedom, an organization known nationally for its work with wild horses, will be working to facilitate the placing of whole herds when possible, helping ensure that many family bands are kept together, and that stallion groups are placed responsibly.

The Humane Society of the United States, another national equine welfare organization, and Patricia Griffin-Soffel contributed toward a fund to cover what the counties expended in feeding and caring for the horses since October.

About 540 horses are still in need of good homes. The ongoing cost of feeding the horses is estimated at $40,000 per month. Those costs will continue throughout the adoption mission. Public support through donations is critical to the success of this campaign.

The health of the remaining mustangs varies widely. While some are in excellent condition, many are underweight and most are infested with parasites. Some of the horses also suffer from blindness or vision impairment, the cause of which is still being investigated.

Fleet of Angels and their participating partners will offer post-adoption subsidies for gelding and other veterinary needs, as well as microchipping each of the horses.

How the public can help

Feed and Care Fund: The public can support the wild horses while adoptions continue by donating to a fund created to for feed, veterinary care, and other costs related the lifesaving mission for the ISPMP horses by donating to the Wild Horse and Burro Sanctuary Alliance or to a fund to assist with transporting horses to safe new homes at Fleet of Angels’ ISPMB Rescue Mission.

Adopt: It is critical that adoptions continue so that every horse can be successfully placed and transported safely to approved homes in the next few weeks. If you would like to help by adopting wild horses in pairs, groups, family bands, or herds please contact: Fleet of Angels at HoldYourHorses@aol.com or on the ISPMB Horses / Emergency Adoption Mission page on Facebook.

http://www.fleetofangels.org/single-post/2017/01/06/SD-state%E2%80%99s-attorneys-file-motion-seeking-transfer-of-ownership-of-at-risk-wild-horses

Judges corral arguments over wild horse protections in remote California county

Story

“This is one of the most significant wild horse populations left in California,”

A dust-up in California’s remote Modoc County has lassoed the attention of one of the nation’s top courts, with wild horse protection and property rights both on the line.

Animal advocates want more land within the Modoc National Forest set aside for wild horses. Ranchers fear the loss of rangeland suitable for cattle grazing. Their legal fight might foreshadow plenty of other public-lands conflicts when the incoming Trump administration starts putting its brand on agencies like the Forest Service.

“This is one of the most significant wild horse populations left in California,” Suzanne Roy, executive director of the Davis, California-based American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, said Thursday.

Located in California’s far northeast corner, Modoc County claims fewer than 10,000 residents. Roughly half the county’s land mass sits within the 1.3 million-acre national forest, enhancing the clout of federal officials and inciting the occasional conflict with residents. It’s a region in which political phrases like Sagebrush Rebellion take root.

This case, though, allies the ranchers with the Forest Service.

In an oral argument set for next Wednesday, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit will consider claims made by the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign and its allies. The court, in Washington, is sometimes called the nation’s second-highest because of its far-reaching authority over federal agencies, so its eventual decision could resonate well beyond Modoc County.

“This action has important implications for how the Forest Service manages the nearly 200 million acres of national forests,” attorneys for the wild horse advocates said in a legal brief.

The 30-minute oral argument is fallout from the Forest Service’s 2013 management plan for a portion of the Modoc National Forest called the Devil’s Garden Plateau Wild Horse Territory. The territory consisted of two parcels totaling 236,000 acres when it was established in 1975.

The Devil’s Garden site is one of 37 federal wild horse or burro territories nationwide.

The Forest Service adjusted the Devil’s Garden borders in the 1980s to create a larger, unified territory, some of it including private land previously used for grazing. The agency further recognized these new borders in a 1991 forest plan. The new management plan in 2013, though, shrunk the territory back to the original 1975 layout.

The change in 2013 cut the expanded wild horse territory by 25,000 acres as it reverted to its original size, and it set a maximum wild horse population of 402.

“We’re trying to prevent the Forest Service from reducing the size of their habitat,” Roy said, adding that “it’s all being driven by the (ranching) interests in the area.”

The California Cattlemen’s Association, state farm bureau and others favoring the smaller territory noted in a legal brief their concerns about the “unprecedented wild horse population explosions that have spilled over onto adjacent private lands and into government-funded offsite holding facilities.”

“Over the past decade, the Devil’s Garden Wild Horse Territory population has exploded to reach 1,124 horses,” the farm groups wrote, adding that “wild horses have even been observed on private property far from the wild horse territory.”

In a 2015 ruling, U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson upheld the Forest Service’s action as administratively justifiable.

“At the time the Devil’s Garden (territory) was established, the Forest Service concluded that the disputed territory did not qualify as the territorial habitat of wild free-roaming horses,” Jackson said in her 50-page opinion.

The challengers appealing Jackson’s decision counter in legal filings that the disputed territory “is, and always has been, prime wild horse habitat.”

First WY Ranchers Target Wild Horses, Now Other Wildlife in Their Gun Sights

Source: Animal Legal Defense Fund

Take Action: Help stop 2 coyote killing contests on BLM controlled federal land

dead_coyotes2

The Animal Legal Defense Fund and a coalition of animal protection organizations submitted a written request to the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM) urging the agency to enforce its own regulations regarding two Rock Springs, Wyoming coyote-hunting contests scheduled to take place in the coming weeks. These contests are slated to take place partly on BLM-managed federal land—and contest organizers have failed to obtain the requisite permits.

The first of these upcoming contests, the “Wyoming Coyote Classic,” is scheduled for this Saturday, Jan. 7—the second, “Wyoming Best of the Best” is scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 4. In light of the impending dates, we need you to contact BLM and politely urge them to hold these contests to the law.

Click (HERE) to send letter!!!

http://org2.salsalabs.com/o/51 54/p/dia/action3/common/public /?action_KEY=23967&okay=true

Correction: Court Asked to Transfer Ownership of ISPMB Former Wild Horses

Source: Timber Lake by Kathy Nelson

CORRECTION!!!  This story is not correct, the petition has NOT been filed.  The reporter is wrong.  Standby for further information!!!!

http://www.timberlakesouthdakota.com/articles/2017/01/04/court-asked-transfer-ownership-ispmb-horses

CBS Airs Rodeo Footage Showing Horses Electrically Shocked to Force Bucking

Source: News of the Horse

“…a rodeo worker is seen shocking a bucking horse with a Miller Manufacturing Hot-Shot Power-Mite”

1-3-17-1Las Vegas, Nevada – The Professional Rodeo Cowboy’s Association (PRCA) contracted with CBS Sports, a subsidiary of CBS, to cover the 2016 Wranglers National Finals.  The PRCA paid CBS Sports an undisclosed sum of money to air the rodeo.

Despite the PRCA’s claim that bucking horses are “bred to buck” and “love bucking,” footage aired by CBS tells a different story.  Using only footage aired by CBS, animal welfare activist group SHARK was able to prove that horses were shocked to force them to buck at the National Finals Rodeo…(CONTINUED)

BLM to Begin Utah Frisco Wild Horse Removal and Sordid Research Project

Unedited article from KCSG.com by BLM’s Lisa Reid

“Dangerous Tracking Collars to be Installed on Wild Horses”

Wild Horse CollarCEDAR CITY, Utah – The Bureau of Land Management Cedar City Field Office will soon be gathering and removing excess wild horses from within and outside the Frisco Wild Horse Herd Management Area (HMA) in western Utah.

The BLM will gather approximately 150 and remove 90 excess wild horses from the Frisco HMA to achieve a research population of an estimated 100 animals on the HMA. Some horses will be fitted with tracking devices and returned to the range as part of a research project. This will provide data on free-roaming horse locations and movement to help the BLM improve understanding of herd behavior.

Helicopter drive-trapping operations are scheduled to begin Friday, Jan. 6. Members of the public are welcome to view the daily gather operations, provided the safety of the animals, staff and observers are not jeopardized and operations are not disrupted.

The BLM will conduct escorted public tours to gather observation sites. Details will be announced daily on the BLM gather hotline, (801) 539-4050.

Those interested in participating should meet at the KB Express Convenience Store/Subway at 238 South Main in Milford, Utah, where tours will depart at 6:30 a.m. MST.

Participants must provide their own transportation, water and food. The BLM recommends footwear and clothing suitable for harsh winter field conditions. Binoculars and four-wheel drive, high clearance vehicles are also strongly recommended. Please note that no public restrooms will be available once the tour begins.

Public lands will remain open unless closures are deemed necessary due to safety concerns. Outdoor recreationists and visitors to the gather area should be aware that there will be low flying helicopters and should avoid recreational use of drones near the Frisco Mountain area. Brief road closures may also be needed to allow movement of horses during gather operations.

Gather updates and information will be posted at: http://bit.ly/CongerFriscoGather

Anyone interested can get updates on Twitter by following @BLMUtah or searching #CongerFriscoGather.

Animals removed from the range will be made available for adoption through the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Adoption Program. Those that are not adopted will be cared for on off-range pastures, where they retain their protection under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act.

Details on the EA and the gather can be found on the BLM’s planning documents website: https://goo.gl/pNIggw . More information on the population control research project is available from the BLM’s Fillmore Field Office at (435) 743-3100.

To learn more about the wild horse and burro program or to obtain an adoption application, visit the BLM National Wild Horse and Burro website at: http://on.doi.gov/2h11lDS .

For additional information on participating in public observation days, contact Lisa Reid, public affairs specialist, at (435)743-3128 or lreid@blm.gov. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1-800-877-8339 to leave a message or question for Lisa Reid. The FRS is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Replies are provided during normal business hours.

Video: “Maybe Next Year”

“We post this video, today, knowing that New Years was two days ago but this small slice of equine/human goodness just came across our desk yesterday and we could not help but want to share it with you, straight away.  Although produced to sell a commercial product, it touches upon on a nerve that many of us have lived and feel tightly bonded to as strongly today as we did yesterday.

To all those who fight the good fight; never give up!

Oh, tissue alert.” ~ R.T.


74 Wild Horses Torn from Freedom and Family

Source: Elko Daily Free Press

BLM removes 74 horses in eastern Nevada

photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

ELY – The Bureau of Land Management’s Ely District has concluded an emergency wild horse gather, removing 74 excess horses from public and private lands adjacent to U.S. Highway 93 and State Route 322.

The plan had been to remove approximately 100 horses from inside and outside the Eagle and Silver King Herd Management Areas in eastern Nevada. The BLM removed 31 wild horses from between Pioche and Eagle Valley, and 43 wild horses from the Bennet Springs area southwest of Panaca.

Horses removed from the range were transported to the BLM’s Indian Lakes off-range corrals located in Fallon, to be prepared for the BLM’s adoption program.

Un-adopted wild horses will be placed in long-term pastures where they will be humanely cared for and retain their “wild” status and protection under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The BLM does not sell or send any wild horses to slaughter. (yeah, right)

Top Wild Horse Article of 2016

Forward by R.T. Fitch, article by Debbie Coffey

“Happy New Year to everyone, it is our most sincere hope (and plan) to make a real difference for the wild horses and burros in 2017 and we are thinking out of the box and have a few things in the works at Wild Horse Freedom Federation that no one else has ever tried before so stay tuned, it is going to get interesting.

I planned to put up the most popular article of 2016 for your reading enjoyment (and should do it soon before I get too deep into an industrial sized mug of Wrangler Iced Tea) but as it turns out, the number one and most popular article in 2016 is one that Debbie Coffey wrote and published in January of 2015…the stats are unbelievable. On an average the article is viewed, at a minimum of an astounding 4,000 times a week with a total of 221,312 views in 2016 and 274,450 times in 2015.  Jaw-dropping!

The article is about Ree Drummond and her husband who make millions off the backs of captured horses while they warehouse and use them as a backdrop for her cooking show and products.  It obviously touched a nerve among the mindless and uninformed as Deb and I receive hate mail on a regular basis but it IS the truth and they ARE wealthy due to your tax money and the mismanagement of the wild horses by the BLM.  Deb and I have thick skin so the hate does not dissuade us but instead motivates us to dig into this situation even deeper and again, 2017 might be quite an interesting year.

Please take a few moments and read the article and form your own opinion as the information is as valid today as it was two years ago.

Again, Happy New Year and be sure to hug all of your critters, be they in the pasture or in the house…the future is ours.!” ~ R.T.


Multi-Millionaire Cowpoke Ladd Drummond, whose little “missus” is Ree Drummond (The Pioneer Woman), rakes in Taxpayer Dollars

by Debbie Coffey                      Copyright 2015                   All Rights Reserved.

It has been 2 1/2 years since the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) last gave the public a tour of any BLM Long Term Holding Pastures, which are used to warehouse once wild horses that were rounded up by helicopters used by BLM contractors and permanently removed from America’s public lands.  So much for the BLM’s claim of transparency.

Millions of readers follow Ree Drummond as she blogs about ranch life, her children, and her husband, whom she calls Marlboro Man. Photograph by Sylvia Plachy.   Millions of readers follow Ree Drummond as she blogs about ranch life, her children, and her husband, whom she calls Marlboro Man. Photograph by Sylvia Plachy. (Source: The New Yorker)

Ladd Drumond, his brother Tim and their dad, Charles, are partners in Drummond Land and Cattle, which has a BLM contract for Long Term Holding pastures for our wild horses.  Ladd is married to “The Pioneer Woman,” Ree Drummond, a Food Network cooking show host/blogger/photographer/cookbook author who writes folksy blogs about her life on their ranch in Oklahoma.  Kind of like she’s a pioneer woman.  Except in real life, Ree is wealthy and has both a house and a nice lodge on her ranch.  (Nothing like the real pioneers, who had to trod across the plains in a covered wagon.)

In a 2013 article on Modern Farmer about America’s 100 Top Landowners (“The who’s who of modern American land moguls”) the Drummond family was listed as #17 (the 17th largest landowner in the U.S.), with “433,000 acres.”

While some of this land may belong to other Drummond family members, Ladd and the little missus are getting by.

It was estimated that Ree’s blogsite income was about a million dollars or more per year just from display advertisement alone.  She also makes dough from her Food Network cooking show, her cookbooks,  her book, the movie option based on her book “Black Heels to Tractor Wheels,” based on her life (and persona) as “The Pioneer Woman.”…(CONTINUED)

Please click, below or above, to view the original article and the hundreds of comments!

https://rtfitchauthor.com/2015/01/30/multi-millionaire-cowpoke-ladd-drummond-whose-little-missus-is-ree-drummond-the-pioneer-woman-rakes-in-taxpayer-dollars/