Utah Flips-Off Feds by Voting To Butcher Protected American Wild Horses

By | The Salt Lake Tribune

Subsidized Welfare Cattle Okay – Federally Protected Wild Equines to be Slaughtered

photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Federal management of wild horses has been a dismal failure, resulting in ecological and economic havoc on Utah’s public ranges, according to new legislation that seeks repeal of the 1971 statute protecting free-roaming horses and burros.

Two bills and an appropriation request promote state management that envisions sharply reducing horse numbers through slaughter and permanent sterilization — measures sure to draw stiff opposition from horse advocates.

But Utah lawmakers and county commissioners are fed up with the Bureau of Land Management‘s approach, which they say allows horses to proliferate at the expense of range health, livestock operators and native wildlife while wasting $50 million a year confining horses that could be slaughtered for their meat.

“The fragmentation coming out of D.C. is tremendous,” Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, told the House Natural Resources, Agriculture and Environmental Quality Committee on Wednesday. “This is a hell for the ecosystem, it’s is a hell for the wildlife species, it’s is a hell for those on the ground who are told the solution is to cut back their livelihoods and their herds. It’s a hell for the animals themselves; they are starving and dying. Clearly we can do this better.” Ivory is the sponsor of HCR22, a resolution calling on the federal government to either take immediate steps to “humanely preserve the feral horse and burro populations in the West at established population management objectives” or cede that authority to the state.

Horse advocates reject the premise of this measure, which is one component of a package of legislative actions targeting wild horse management.

Rep. Keven Stratton, R-Orem, is seeking $1.1 million to manage Utah’s 19 herds, whose population now exceeds 5,000, or about 2½ times the BLM’s target. He is also sponsoring a bill that lays out a state management plan. Stratton and others have made it clear state management could entail slaughtering horses, but horse advocates say such proposals would face a buzz saw of controversy.

“Utah is a beautiful state. I would hate to see it get a black eye with these crazy inhumane plans,” said filmmaker Ginger Kathrens, executive director of the Cloud Foundation and member of the BLM’s wild horse advisory board. “You would have to have the law changed where Utah is this special place where they get management and their plan is to kill them. That’s jumping through an awfully narrow hoop. It irks me that they are so blind to the benefits [of free-roaming horses] and can’t see beyond their ignorance. They are so out of step with what the American public wants. When you talk about killing healthy animals and trafficking them to Mexico, it’s just disgusting.”

But lethal population control is in line with positions advocated by Interior Secretary nominee Ryan Zinke as well as the BLM advisory panel, which urged the agency last September to offer “all suitable animals in long- and short-term holding deemed unadoptable for sale without limitation or humane euthanasia. Those animals deemed unsuitable for sale should then be destroyed in the most humane manner possible.” Advisory panel members said they were not endorsing slaughter for meat, but after a negative public reaction, the BLM pledged it would not destroy healthy horses and burros.

Ironically, Utah’s new legislative push comes as the BLM conducts its most aggressive roundups in Utah in years. Last month, 700 horses from the Sulphur herd were gathered in Beaver County and the agency is currently rounding up the Cedar Mountain herd west of Tooele. So far, 534 horses have been gathered with a goal of 600 to 700. In both these gathers, the BLM planned to administer a fertility vaccine to 200 mares and return them to the range with an equal number of stallions. That decision prompted a lawsuit from Beaver County, alleging the BLM should not return horses to the Sulphur herd area, where horse numbers still exceed the “appropriate management level.”

The Utah operations deploy birth control known as PZP-22, which activates the immune system to thwart conception. This drug is effective for a year or two, and Utah lawmakers want to see something longer lasting. In addition to lethal measures, Ivory’s resolution calls for scaled-up use of GnRH-based vaccines, a new fertility-control technology that “can permanently sterilize a young horse by inhibiting the hormones that would make it sexually mature.”

Most horse-advocacy groups endorse PZP, but that is not the case with GnRH, or GonaCon, which they say has not been proven safe…(CONTINUED)

http://www.sltrib.com/home/4967398-155/utah-lawmakers-the-time-has-come?ref=yfp

Agents Seize Horse Meat, Genitals at Airport Outside Capital

S0urce: Multiple

“The women had a combined 42 pounds of horse meat concealed inside juice boxes…”

photo by U.S. Customs and Border Protection

photo by U.S. Customs and Border Protection

STERLING, Va. – Customs agents have seen all sorts of things come through travelers’ baggage. And what they seized from two women at Washington Dulles International Airport last month may take the cake.

On January 29, two women arrived from Mongolia. Customs and Border Protection officers sent them for a routine agriculture examination. What was found inside might turn your stomach.

The women had a combined 42 pounds of horse meat concealed inside juice boxes. That includes 13 pounds of horse genitals that one of the women claimed were for medicinal purposes.

Horse meat is prohibited from entering the country unless the traveler has an official government horse meat certification from the country of origination. The concern is bringing foot and mouth disease into the United States and introducing it to livestock here.

Customs and Border Protection takes no pleasure in seizing and destroying travelers’ food products,” said Wayne Biondi, CBP Port Director for the Area Port of Washington Dulles. “We’re in the business of protecting America’s agriculture industries, like the livestock industry, from the potential introduction of animal diseases posed by these unpermitted food products.”

All of the meat was incinerated.

“Safeguarding America’s agriculture industries, and by extension our nation’s economy, remains an enforcement priority for Customs and Border Protection.  It is a mission that we take very seriously,” said Casey Owen Durst, CBP’s Field Operations Director in Baltimore, the agency’s operational commander in the mid-Atlantic region.

CBP agriculture specialists inspect more than 1 million people coming into the U.S. every day.

NM Senate Committee Passes Horse as Livestock Bill

Dianne L Stallings , Ruidoso News

“Wild Horse Advocates fear new provisions could lead to the elimination of wild herds…”

Members of the wild herd rounded up last year were photographed crossing at their designated point on the highway leading into Alto and Ruidoso.(Photo: Courtesy/Melissa Babcock)

Members of the wild herd rounded up last year were photographed crossing at their designated point on the highway leading into Alto and Ruidoso.(Photo: Courtesy/Melissa Babcock)

Local advocates for wild horse herds in New Mexico piled into a bus at 3:30 a.m. Thursday and headed to Santa Fe to voice their views on an amended version of a state senate bill they feared would lead to the elimination of wild horse herds that roam the Alto area north of Ruidoso.

Despite the efforts of advocates, they reported that members of the Senate Conservation Committee passed the bill in less than five minutes. A series of hearings led to modifications of the original bill submitted by State Sen. Pat Woods, a Republican from Quay County, that eliminates the classification of domesticated horse.

While under the amended version horses still would be lumped into the broad definition for livestock that fall under the jurisdiction of the New Mexico Livestock Board, specific exceptions were included for Spanish colonial horses and for a “wild horse” defined as an “unclaimed horse without obvious brands or other evidence of private ownership that is determined by the board to originate from public land or federal land or to be part of or descended from a herd that lives on or originates from public land; but does not include horses that are subject to the jurisdiction of the federal government pursuant to the federal Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act.”

Public land does not include federal land controlled by the Bureau of Land Management, the Forest Service or state trust land.

Under the amended version, a wild horse captured on private land in New Mexico at the discretion of the livestock board “shall be” humanely captured and relocated to state public land or to a public or private horse preserve; adopted by a qualified person (for an adoption fee); or humanely euthanized provided the option is the last resort when the horse is determined by a licensed veterinarian to be crippled or otherwise unhealthy or cannot be relocated to a public or private wild horse preserve or adopted.

A new section throws in another wrinkle for the future of “wild horses” such as the herds in Alto. That section in the amended bill provides when requested by the board to determine the viability of a specific New Mexico wild horse herd on the range they occupy, the range improvement task force of New Mexico State University will evaluate the range conditions to determine the number of wild horses that the range can support while maintaining its ecological health.

The task force will report the results of the evaluation to the board. “If required, the board may cause control of the New Mexico wild horse herd population through the use of birth control and may cause excess horses to be humanely captured” and relocated, adopted or euthanized…(CONTINUED)

http://www.ruidosonews.com/story/news/local/2017/02/09/senate-committee-passes-horse-livestock-bill/97712106/

300 Former Wild Horses in South Dakota Need Homes as Deadline Looms

Source: ISPMB/Emergency Adoption Mission

“The ‘Hallelujah Horses’ Need Your Help!”

Volunteers are scrambling to find homes for hundreds of wild horses in South Dakota that were spared a possible trip to the slaughterhouse but are now suffering through a harsh winter.

The horses, some of them blind, were once kept at a troubled South Dakota sanctuary. Now a small group of volunteers from across the country is working 10 hours a day to feed and care for animals, using rented plows to carve paths through 15-foot snowdrifts. In a nearby hotel room, other volunteers are sorting through adoption applications and networking through social media, desperately trying to find homes for the horses before they are forced to leave the property next month.

“We are working to get the whole herd out of the 15-foot snow. Some are blind and are walking out right over the fences. It’s really hard to work with so many horses with so many problems,” said Elaine Nash, director of horse rescue organization Fleet of Angels, who is spearheading the operation. “Every time we get over one hurdle there’s another one waiting for us.”

Some 500 horses have already been placed in sanctuaries and ranches across the country, from Arizona and Oregon to California and Minnesota. But the effort near Lantry, in northern South Dakota, isn’t done.

The remaining 300 wild horses could be more difficult to sell or have adopted, Nash said. Nearly 200 are stallions that need gelding before anyone will want them. Dozens are old and have health problems. Others are blind from what Nash suspects was toxic farm runoff in their drinking pond.

But Nash was grateful for the response so far to the neglected herd. Many of the less desirable horses have already found homes, and Nash is hopeful that most will be out of South Dakota by their deadline.

When Nash first spread the word in October, This Old Horse rescue in Hastings, Minnesota, agreed to take two older mares.

They wound up taking seven stallions, all blind, instead.

“I don’t know how it happened,” joked Nancy Turner, board president of This Old Horse. “Elaine is really good at convincing people.”

Turner said it’s not easy. The horses are wild, after all, and need special handling and transportation. Most have never been inside a barn or trailer.

“But part of it for me is that these aren’t poor needy horses,” Turner said. “They are magnificent. I thought that we could celebrate them rather than see them as poor things that should probably be put down.”

More than 800 horses were impounded in October at the nonprofit International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros after a state veterinarian found they were being neglected and a former ranch employee said they were being starved to death. All but 20 were eventually surrendered by their owner.

By mid-December, a third of the horses had been adopted or sold while the other 550 or so were being held as collateral by county officials seeking reimbursement for the cost of caring for the horses. When it didn’t come, the counties started planning to auction off the rest to recoup the cost, making animal rights groups fear many of the horses would be brought to slaughterhouses in Canada and Mexico.

Fleet of Angels and other animal rights groups raised the $78,000 still owed to the counties and stopped the auction. They then assumed the costs and responsibility of caring for the horses

The group is now gathering, microchipping, collecting blood samples and trimming the feet of the remaining horses and gelding the stallions. Meanwhile, they still need financial support to feed and care for a herd burning through $1,000 in hay each day.

Nash said horses won’t be euthanized unless they have broken bones or serious conditions — even horses that might be difficult to adopt.

“We know that someone will come forward and give them good homes. People care about these horses and about making this mission a success,” she said.

Note: “200 stallions” was the total number of the stallions out of the total 810.  Also, about 95% of the horses look great after receiving $150,000 worth of hay since mid-October.

Feel Good Sunday: Old Horse At ‘Kill Lot’ Decides To Rescue Himself

by as published on The Dodo

“He was intent that this was his ride out of there.”

BubblesAn old horse was at a “kill lot” in Texas when he realized he would simply have to save his own life.

So when he spotted a group of people who were there to rescue some mini donkeys in the same life-threatening predicament, he decided to go with them.

“This skinny, grey gelding walked straight up to our trailer, past the gates, disregarding the commands of the kill lot employees,” Becky’s Hope Horse Rescue in Frisco, Texas, wrote earlier this month. “He was intent that this was his ride out of there.”

Sarah McGregor, a spokesperson for Becky’s Hope, explained that the “kill lot” in North Texas where the horse, named Bubbles, comes from is the last place animals get a chance to be rescued before heading to Mexico for slaughter.

“Oftentimes, the horses or donkeys are old, or the owners lost their property, or the owners passed away or simply are unable to care for them and they are sold to auction,” McGregor told The Dodo. “If they are not bought at auction by people or other farms, the slaughter pipeline will buy up all of the animals and resell them.”

This was very nearly Bubbles’s fate — before he decided to adopt his own rescuers. “We stood there staring as this old guy with crumbled ears from frostbite waited patiently for the group of mini donkeys to catch up so he could jump on the ‘freedom trailer’ out of there,” the rescue wrote. “There was just no way we could leave him behind!”

Luckily, the rescuers had just enough money from donations to Becky’s Hope to rescue this old guy — so they did. “This sweet, old man won our hearts the minute he decided it was the perfect time to escape the kill lot,” the rescue wrote. “It seems that he thought nobody would notice him escaping if he simply mixed in with the mini donkeys!”

Now he’s safe and happy at Becky’s Hope, meeting people who want to stroke the nose of the horse who rescued himself. “He is adjusting so well as if he knew that this rescue was where he belonged all along,” McGregor said. “He loves attention, loves grazing and getting special treats.”

Click (HERE) to read more.

Horse Eaters in EU Complain of Brazilian Horse Flesh Laced with Naproxen

“Sorry, can’t get upset over humans eating the flesh of companion animals and complaining about what sort of chemicals are in it.  Horse carcasses from the U.S. are toxic to humans and now Brazil has drugs in meat not intended for human consumption.  Just what are the poor European horse eaters to do?  (I have an idea, it has something to do with that mysterious place where the sun never shines.)” ~ R.T.


By Oscar Rousseau as published on GlobalMeatNews.com

A discovery of Brazilian horsemeat laced with naproxen in Belgium has sparked calls for tough controls over EU imports of horsemeat.

naproxenThe identification of naproxen, a substance banned in EU foodstuffs, in horsemeat imports shipped from Brazil to Belgium has sparked fresh food safety concerns, raised by the Humane Society International (HSI).

The body has been strongly critical of the EU’s imports of horsemeat from Brazil after evidence emerged of animal welfare abuse in South America. This latest discovery has led HSI to, in its own words, “sound the alert bell” about the food safety issues linked to Brazilian horsemeat.

Total ban

Following the identification of naproxen, HSI has called on the European Commission to toughen controls. The body wants to see mandatory testing for the presence of outlawed substances implemented for all Brazilian exports of horsemeat to the EU. It stopped short of calling for a total ban on imports.

“For years, we have consistently warned about the threat that the export of horsemeat from non-EU countries poses to EU consumerism,” said Joanna Swabe, EU executive director of HSI.

“The detection of naproxen in Brazilian horsemeat demonstrates yet again that the Brazilian authorities are unable to ensure compliance with EU import requirements and that urgent action is needed to protect both animals and consumers.”

HSI believes that mandatory testing of horsemeat will prevent unauthorised substances in meat making its way to EU consumers. A similar system was applied to Mexico in 2006 and HSI said this helped address the concerns of the European Commission’s former Food and Veterinary office.

However, HSI’s latest call for tougher controls failed to mention that Brussels has recently announced plans to tighten controls on non-EU horsemeat imports.

New rules

In September 2016, the European Commission announced new measures that would require horsemeat that comes from outside the Eurozone to have a minimum six-month residency in the country of slaughter. These new rules come into play on 31 March 2017.

The new traceability rules are likely to cause problems for Canada, as the majority of horses it slaughters come from the US.

Rule changes came about after an audit, published earlier in 2016, identified serious shortcomings in Brazil’s horsemeat supply chain. The EU’s Food and Veterinary Office (FVO) audit raised “serious concerns” over welfare abuse, after a horse died en route to an abattoir.

The report also noted that Brazil’s 2014 and 2015 residue monitoring plan could not demonstrate a level of equivalence to EU food safety standards – a prerequisite for meat trade with Europe.

The European Commission notified that horsemeat tainted with naproxen had been discovered on 19 December 2016. The meat, however, seems to have been sampled on 28 October 2016.

Horse, possum and donkey meat on menu under South Australian food safety changes

Source:  The Guardian

Proposal, which has been opposed by the Animal Justice party, would be implemented by September if adopted

4600

 South Australia could be the second jurisdiction to allow for the local production and sale of horse meat, after Western Australia adopted the broader national standards in 2009. Photograph: Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images

Horse, possum, camel and donkey will be available for sale from South Australian butchers from September next year if recommended changes to food safety regulations are adopted.

The SA government, which has to update the regulations by 1 September 2017, has suggested the state should adopt the Australian and New Zealand Food Standards code definition of “game meat”, which governs what wild animals may be sold commercially for human consumption.

The proposed change would broaden the range of animals available at butchers to include wild horses and donkeys, as well as wild buffalo, camel, deer, pig and possum.

Domestic horses, like racehorses, would still not be allowed to be sold for human consumption. Eggs, foetuses and pouch young are still off the list.

Wild goats, rabbits, hare, kangaroo, wallaby and any bird that may be legally hunted can already be slaughtered and sold for human consumption in SA.

A spokeswoman from SA Health said the proposed changes would not change the laws around hunting or culling protected species.

“Any South Australians wanting to hunt protected species in SA would need a permit as per the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 legislation,” she said

The move would make SA only the second jurisdiction to allow for the local production and sale of horse meat, after Western Australia adopted the broader national standards in 2009. The proposed change has been opposed by the Animal Justice party.

“The newly proposed game industries are particularly obnoxious because they produce meats that people don’t even like,” convenor Geoff Russell told the Advertiser.

According to the Humane Society, about 100,000 horses are slaughtered annually in Australia.

Of those about 8,400 are processed through one of two abattoirs licensed to slaughter horses for export – Samex Peterborough in South Australia and Meramist in Caboolture, Queensland. The rest are processed by one of 33 knackeries and sold as pet meat.

Read the rest of this story HERE.

Breaking News: BLM Soliciting Nominations for Wild Horse and Burro Slaughter Advisory Board

reported by R.T. Fitch

“We were attempting to keep only good news and articles flowing during the holiday season but this announcement just broke, today.

Currently Ginger Kathrens is the only qualified person serving on the present board and she is, likewise, the only member to vote against butchering tens of thousands of wild horses that the BLM has illegally captured and currently  confines at taxpayer expense.

Ginger is the token advocate, while the rest are all special interest, per-screened appointees that are interested in only horse slaughter, welfare ranching, hunting and personal affirmation.

If you could recommend anyone to stand with Ginger, fat chance, who would you pick…we can play this exercise, again.

Brainstorm away….” ~ R.T.

Banner from America’s Wild Horse Advocates (AWHA) with Melissa Ohlsson, Vice President of AWHA as artist

Banner from America’s Wild Horse Advocates (AWHA) with Melissa Ohlsson, Vice President of AWHA as artist


[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 248 (Tuesday, December 27, 2016)]
[Notices]
[Pages 95177-95178]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-31216]
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Bureau of Land Management

[LLWO260000.L10600000PC0000.17X.LXSIADVSBD0.241A]


Call for Nominations for the National Wild Horse and Burro 
Advisory Board

AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior.

ACTION: Notice.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------


SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to solicit public nominations 
for three positions on the Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board (Board) 
that will become vacant on April 3, 2017. The Board provides advice 
concerning the management, protection, and control of wild free-roaming 
horses and burros on public lands administered by the Department of the 
Interior, through the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the 
Department of Agriculture, through the U.S. Forest Service.

DATES: Nominations must be post marked or submitted to the address 
listed below no later than February 10, 2017.

ADDRESSES: All mail sent via the U.S. Postal Service should be sent as 
follows: Division of Wild Horses and Burros, U.S. Department of the 
Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street NW., Room 2134 LM, 
Attn: Dorothea Boothe, WO-260, Washington, DC 20240. All mail and 
packages that are sent via FedEx or UPS should be addressed as follows: 
Wild Horse and Burro Division, U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau 
of Land Management, 20 M Street SE., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Dorothea 
Boothe, Washington, DC 20003. You may also email PDF documents to Ms. 
Boothe at dboothe@blm.gov.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dorothea Boothe, Acting Wild Horse and 
Burro Program Specialist, 202-912-7654. Persons who use a 
telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay 
Service at 1-800-877-8339 to contact the above individual during normal 
business hours. The Service is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 
You will receive a reply during normal business hours.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Members of the Board serve without 
compensation. However, while away from their homes or regular places of 
business, Board and subcommittee members engaged in Board or 
subcommittee business, approved by the Designated Federal Official 
(DFO), may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of 
subsistence, in the same manner as persons employed intermittently in 
government service under Section 5703 of Title 5 of the United States 
Code. Nominations for a term of three years are needed to represent the 
following categories of interest:

Natural Resource Management
Wild Horse and Burro Research
Public Interest (Equine behavior)

    The Board will meet one to four times annually. The DFO may call 
additional meetings in connection with special needs for advice. 
Individuals may nominate themselves or others. An individual serving on 
another resource advisory council is not eligible to serve concurrently 
on the Board. Any individual or organization may nominate one or more 
persons to serve on the Board. Nominations will not be accepted without 
a complete resume. The following information must accompany all 
nominations for the individual to be considered for a position:
    1. The position(s) for which the individual wishes to be 
considered;
    2. The individual's first, middle, and last name;
    3. Business address and phone number;
    4. Home address and phone number;
    5. Email address;
    6. Present occupation/title and employer;
    7. Education (colleges, degrees, major field of study);
    8. Career Highlights: Significant related experience, civic and 
professional activities, elected offices (include prior advisory 
committee experience or career achievements related to the interest to 
be represented). Attach additional pages, if necessary;
    9. Qualifications: Education, training, and experience that qualify 
you to serve on the Board;
    10. Experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management;
    11. Experience or knowledge of horses or burros (Equine health, 
training, and management);
    12. Experience in working with disparate groups to achieve 
collaborative solutions (e.g., civic organizations, planning 
commissions, school boards, etc.);
    13. Identification of any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by 
the individual or his or her employer;
    14. Indication of whether the individual is a federally registered 
lobbyist; and
    15. Explanation of interest in serving on the Board.
    All nominations must be accompanied by at least one letter of

[[Page 95178]]

reference sent from special interests or organizations the individual 
may represent, including, but not limited to, business associates, 
friends, co-workers, local, State, and/or Federal government 
representatives, or members of Congress as well as any other 
information that is relevant to the individual's qualifications.
    As appropriate, certain Board members may be appointed as special 
government employees. Special government employees serve on the Board 
without compensation, and are subject to financial disclosure 
requirements in the Ethics in Government Act and 5 CFR 2634. 
Nominations are to be sent to the address listed under the ADDRESSES 
section above.
    Privacy Act Statement: The authority to request this information is 
contained in 5 U.S.C. 301, the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), 
and 43 CFR part 1784. The appointment officer uses this information to 
determine education, training, and experience related to possible 
service on a BLM advisory council. If you are appointed as an advisor, 
the information will be retained by the appointing official for as long 
as you serve. Otherwise, it will be destroyed 2 years after termination 
of your membership or returned (if requested) following announcement of 
the Board's appointments. Submittal of this information is voluntary. 
However, failure to complete any or all items will inhibit fair 
evaluation of your qualifications, and could result in you not 
receiving full consideration for appointment.
    Membership Selection: Individuals shall qualify to serve on the 
Board because of their education, training, or experience that enables 
them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they 
represent. They should demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area 
of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions 
to resource management issues. The Board is structured to provide fair 
membership and balance, both geographic and interest specific, in terms 
of the functions to be performed and points of view to be represented. 
Members are selected with the objective of providing representative 
counsel and advice about public land and resource planning. No person 
is to be denied an opportunity to serve because of race, age, sex, 
religion, or national origin. The Obama Administration prohibits 
individuals who are currently federally registered lobbyists to serve 
on all FACA and non-FACA boards, committees or councils. Pursuant to 
Section 7 of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, members of 
the Board cannot be employed by either Federal or State governments.

(Authority: 43 CFR 1784.4-1, 43 CFR 1784.6-1)

Kristin Bail,
Assistant Director, Resources and Planning.
[FR Doc. 2016-31216 Filed 12-23-16; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 4310-84-P

https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/search/pagedetails.action?granuleId=2016-31216&packageId=FR-2016-12-27&acCode=FR&collectionCode=FR

Whither the “Wild” Horses of Louisiana?

By Fran Jurga as published on EQUUS

Wild Horse Advocates Challenge US Army in Legal Standoff

tjr-wild-horses-of-louisiana-640

Herds of wild horses roam the United States under many jurisdictions. One of the most unusual–and contentious–has been the fight over the fate of a herd in Louisiana that likes to range into the US military base at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The US Army wants the trespassers to leave. Their defenders want the Army to keep their hands off these horses. The next range they’ll roam will be the US court  system, as advocates sue to protect the rights of the wild horses you probably never even knew were there.

 An advocacy group called the Pegasus Equine Guardian Association (PEGA) is rounding up support for its day in court with the US Army at Fort Polk. The struggle between advocates and the military goes back to the first roundups in the 1990s. At that time, state officials were accused of pressuring the military to get rid of the horses…(CONTINUED)

http://equusmagazine.com/blog/defending-wild-horses-louisiana-citizens-army-standoff-legal-case-54784