Volcanic Eruption Forcing Horse Evacuations on Big Island Hawaii

By as published on The Horse

Kīlauea began erupting on May 3, sending molten lava into residential communities and forcing more than 1,500 people and a still-undetermined number of horses to evacuate.

PAHOA, HI – MAY 5: In this handout photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava errupts from a new fissure from Luana Street after the eruption of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano on May 5, 2018 in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii. The governor of Hawaii has declared a local state of emergency near the Mount Kilauea volcano after it erupted following a 5.0-magnitude earthquake, forcing the evacuation of nearly 1,700 residents. (Photo by U.S. Geological Survey via Getty Images)

A number of horses have been removed from the path of blazing lava emitting from the Kīlauea volcano on the island of Hawaii.

Hawaii is the largest of the Hawaiian Islands, and Kīlauea is the most active of the five shield volcanoes that comprise the island. Kīlauea began erupting on May 3, sending molten lava into residential communities and forcing more than 1,500 people and a still-undetermined number of horses to evacuate.

“We do not have a complete count … because some owners evacuated their horses on their own without assistance from the government agencies (such as) the County of Hawaii, State of Hawaii Department of Agriculture, (or) the University of Hawaii,” said Jason D. Moniz, DVM, program manager for the Hawaii Department of Agriculture’s Animal Disease Control Branch.

However, at least 19 horses were evacuated to the County of Hawaii’s Panaewa Equestrian Center, 10 were taken to Hilo Farm at the University of Hawaii, and two more were moved to the state’s Panaewa Livestock Quarantine facility, he said.

“I am sure there are others that have been moved to private ranches and pastures,” Moniz said. “If I had to guess, 20 to 25 or so more.”

Moniz said Kilauea has been continuously erupting at a remote site since 1983, however the last time an eruption occurred near this current site was in 1955 when it lasted three months. As a result, there is no way of knowing how long the horses will be away from their home pastures.

“We are being told by USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) to expect the eruption to continue for a while,” he said. “Probably the most accurate comment would be that it’s pretty unpredictable how long this current eruption will last.”

https://thehorse.com/157866/volcanic-eruption-forcing-horse-evacuations-in-hawaii/

Will Justice Be Served? Horse Sues Former Abuser In Groundbreaking Lawsuit

Feel Good Sunday Part II: Horse born with no ears defies the odds to happy life at rescue center

By Lauren Fruen as published on StoryTrender

“Many thanks to our good friend Jerry Finch of Habit for Horses for turning us onto this delightful story.  Job well done, guys.” ~ R.T.


“A horse born with no ears is loving life at Habitat for Horses

Pia, five, was born missing her right lobe completely and with a stump on the left side of her head.

Studies have shown that horses use their ears to communicate and talk to their equine friends.

They are understood to use the subtle movements to talk and they are so important that if its ears are covered up another horse struggles to know what it is thinking.

But Pia – who could have struggled to be part of the herd – is living a happy life among other horses at rescue center Habitat for Horses.

She was rescued along with 11 other horses and vets believe she was born without her ears.

photo courtesy of HfH

Spokesman for Habitat for Horses, Amber Barnes, said: “She is completely missing her ear on the right side and only has a deformed nub on the left.

“She does seem to have some hearing out of the left deformed nub. It looks as though her ears are pinned back.

“Horses use their ears a lot to communicate with one another and we humans usually watch horse ears to better understand what they are communicating.

“Not having ears can be pretty problematic for a horse. Without them, interactions can be more difficult.

“The vets aren’t positive about the origin of Pia’s condition. We believe it may be a congenital defect, meaning she was born with it.

“Looking at a horses ear position and tail position can tell you if they are listening, relaxed, nervous, scared.

“Often, if a horse’s ears are pinned back they aren’t too happy so if you were to look at Pia, you might think she is pretty unhappy as it looks as though her ears are pinned back.

“However, Pia does an impressive job holding her own among the other horses. We don’t have to keep her separate.

“Some horses that live in particularly cold climates may suffer frostbite and lose parts of their ears. A newly born foal could lose their ears mostly to frost bite.

“However, the vet believes Pia’s condition is congenital and she was born with only the deformed nub of an ear and no ear on the other side.

“Pia doesn’t seem too concerned about her condition and she has lived with a group of horses for years without many issues.

“She can really hold her own in the herd and I think other horses who live with her read the rest of her body language and determine her tone effectively.

“A new horse may have some trouble but would likely learn pretty quickly to understand her.”

Tiniest Horse With Dwarfism Doesn’t Care That He’s A Little Different

By as published on The Dodo

He was so small when he was rescued that he had to ride on someone’s lap on the drive home.


“Years ago, my wife Terry, Leslie Anne Webb and I had the distinct pleasure of meeting Munchie when he first came to live with Rebecca Williams of Habitat for Horses…he is quite a guy.!” ~ R.T.


Mini horse with dwarfism staring at larger horses through a fence
Woman kissing mini horse on the nose
Two miniature horses eating grass and flowers
Children petting miniature horse
Mini horse playing with ball
Closeup photo of mini horse
Woman feeding two mini-horses in pasture
Miniature horse touching noses with another horse
Miniature horse with hair braided
Woman in wheelchair petting miniature horse
Miniature horse saying hello to larger horses

Feel Good Sunday (video): Humans Help Save Injured Baby Donkey

by Animal Aid Unlimited, India

“With all the madness that has enveloped the equine world, be it man-made or caused by nature, it feels good to simply sit back for a moment and watch kind gentle souls help a four legged critter in need.  We by no means endorse a particular rescue but simply thought this story was worth sharing; brings back memories closer to home of the rescue/rehab work of Marjorie Farabee, Jerry Finch, Hilary Wood, Elaine Nash and many others.

To all you human angels who tend to those who traverse this planet on 4 legs, may God bless you and keep you.  Your wingspan is greater than you may think.  Keep the faith.” ~ R.T.


Multiple CA Wildfires Take Heavy Toll on both Humans and Horses

By and   as published on The Orange County Register

“This is a tragedy that I have shied away from because of the voluminous amount of news on the subject.  Hundreds of articles are out there detailing the death and destruction with horses being killed and lost at an unprecedented rate.

But today I  decided to share this story because while reporting all of the bad news there lies within a sliver of joy, hope and happiness.  Often you have to dig deep to find something to feel good about and today is assuredly one of those days. 

Our prayers go out to those who struggle to keep themselves and those they love, safe.  May God be with you.” ~ R.T.


OCEANSIDE, CA – Fire crews stopped the Lilac’s destructive march on Friday, keeping to 4,100 acres a blaze that a day earlier had forced thousands to flee their homes, destroyed at least 105 structures and killed dozens of horses.

With the strong winds that initially drove the flames dying down overnight, fire crews were able to move from defense to offense, as aircraft dropped water on hot-spots while hand crews kept an eye out for potential flare-ups.

Despite the improved weather conditions, San Diego County Supervisor Dianne Jacob cautioned residents to remain alert. Officials reported 15 percent containment of the fire Friday night, meaning for only that amount were they confident the flames wouldn’t jump the perimeter.

“A fire that starts in the back country can go anywhere at any time, particularly when those winds shift,” Jacob said. “We are not out of the woods yet.”

The fast-moving blaze ignited late Thursday morning. Officials estimated that around 900 people have shown up at fire shelters, while an estimated 10,000 people were evacuated at one point. The cause was unknown.

Two firefighters and four civilians were injured. It was unclear how many of the 105 structures were homes.

Flames burned through a quiet, semi-rural portion of San Diego County best known for ranches and orchards. Crews worked to keep the fire from burning west toward the larger Oceanside community or onto Camp Pendleton.

Trainers and staff at the facility cut loose some of the 450-plus horses so they could escape the flames. Dramatic video apparently recorded by a stable hand in the midst of the rescue efforts showed waves of horses running through the smoke as workers hurried to release them. Still, the California Horse Racing Board estimated 25 horses died.

Most of the survivors were trucked to the safety of the Del Mar Fairgrounds.

More than 1,000 fire personnel were dedicated to the Lilac Fire on Friday, along with more than 100 fire engines and 15 helicopters, Cal Fire spokesman Kendal Bortisser said.

“We continue to fight this fire from the air and the ground,” Bortisser said.

The Lilac fire put thousands of U.S. Marines at nearby Camp Pendleton on alert. Two military aviation strike teams were on-hand to help support firefighting efforts.

Of the 85 destroyed structures, officials were unsure how many were homes.

“There were quite a few mobile homes that were lost in the area,” San Diego County Sheriff Bill Gore said. “That includes senior citizens.”

Friday, residents were taking stock of the damage.

Mary Klodell, 54, was riding her bike on the San Luis Rey trail when she saw smoke in the air – sending her racing home to pack essentials before leaving the area.

“We heard crackling and popping behind us,” she said. “I was panicked and looking for my keys.”

On Friday, Klodell returned to the neighborhood, walking the ruins of some homes and finding others still intact. A neighbor told her that only a small shift in the weather saved her residence.

“He told me the wind shifted right in time, or else my house would be done now,” she said. “That’s God protecting me.”

At the Stepp Stables at Camp Pendleton, Sandrine Linglet was overwhelmed and crying tears of joy. A day earlier, seeing smoke and fire in the air, Linglet, 46, had driven to the Oceanside Equestrian Center, where she kept four mustangs.

“I could barely see, it was back and red everywhere,” Linglet recalled.

On her first trip, Linglet, who had also been forced to evacuate her Oceanside home, was able to get two mustangs into a trailer. Ignoring warnings from firefighters, she returned Thursday night to rescue a third with the help of two Marines and brought the horse back to the Pendleton stable. They were unable to corral the fourth unbroken mustang.

“I was in tears and exhausted,” Linglet said. “I felt guilty. I couldn’t believe that I left her behind.”

Linglet spent the night at Stepp Stables — partly hunkering down with the three rescued mustangs and then sitting in her car listening to news reports.

“I cried the whole night but I was sure no matter what, i would not give up,” she said. “No matter what, no matter how, I would try to get my horse.”

Just before daylight, Linglet returned to the Oceanside Equestrian Center on Friday just a few miles from the stables at Camp Pendleton. She was shocked to see her fourth mustang, Margo, standing in a field. Hours later, the four were all safe at Camp Pendleton, which lent space for evacuated steeds.

Around 11 a.m. on Thursday, James Adams smelled smoke near his 3,300 square-foot home that overlooks the San Luis Rey river valley, about eight miles from Fallbrook. He helped his wife gather paintings and other valuables and got her, two dogs and a parrot into the car.

“I didn’t want her to be here,” the 68-year-old said. “I didn’t know how fast it would come.”

By 2 p.m., the fire had consumed the house two doors away, as the wind screamed over his home. He watched as the wind and flames shifted to the south, burning five homes to the ground at the end of this street. That night, there was no electricity, but he saw an orangey sky.

He called 911 twice, alerting firefighters to fire near him. Each time, helicopters doused the flames.

“I think the fire fighters did an amazing job,” he said.

Friday afternoon, Adams was able to think about how lucky he had been.

“I’ve been putting my library together for 40 years,” he said, “it’s one of my most personal possessions.”

Other links:

Horse death toll at San Luis Rey Downs from wildfire could climb past 40

Trainer severely burned, race horses killed in California wildfires

At least 50 horses die as Southern California wildfires take ‘tragic’ toll on equestrian communities

Lilac Fire at San Luis Rey Downs takes devastating toll on horse racing community

Feel Good Sunday: Crossing the Bridge

 

“It is the weekend of Thanksgiving, a time to reflect and pull our loved ones close and give thanks for their cherished presence.

But sadly, this Thanksgiving, very close friends of ours lost a special equine companion who we had just visited this week; a true testament to the power of rescue and compassion, of tenacity and strength. Yet, this great soul passed unexpectedly across the bridge and left those behind to struggle with yet another empty hole within their caring hearts.

On this ‘Feel Good Sunday’ I leave for you, Susan, a poem by an unknown author that I hope brings a bit of peace to your heart and warmth to your soul.

We all thank you for what you do, equines and humans alike.

We love you.” ~ R.T.


Crossing the Bridge

I stood beside your bed last night, I came to have a peep.
I could see that you were crying; you found it hard to sleep.

I whinnied to you softly as you brushed away a tear,
“It’s me, I haven’t left you. I’m well, I’m fine, I’m here.”

I was with all of you at my grave today; you tend it with such care.
I want to reassure each and everyone, that I’m not lying there.

I walked with all of you toward the house, as you fumbled for your key.
I put my head against you, nickered and said, “It’s me.”

You looked so very tired, and sank into a chair.
I tried so hard to let you know that I was standing there.

It’s possible for me to be so near you every day.
To say to you with certainty, “I never went away.”

You sat there very quietly, then smiled; I think you knew.
In the stillness of that evening, I was very close to you.

And when the time is right for you to cross the brief divide,
I’ll gallop across to greet you, and we’ll stand there side by side.

I have so many things to show you, there’s so much for you to see.
Be patient, live your journey out…then come home to be with me.

Feel Good Sunday Video: 16-year-old boy drives through burning barn wall to save 14 trapped Clydesdale horses

source: TNK

““He busted through like Rambo and opened up the end of the stalls…”

Macon Martin, 16, is being called a hero after his quick thinking saved the lives of 14 Clydesdale horses.

The family home, located about 60 miles east of Atlanta, Georgia, was struck by lighting in the middle of the night.

“It shook the whole house,” Macon’s mother, Shannon said. “One minute I am in bed; the next minute I am standing up next to the bed trying to figure out what bomb went off.”

Without power, the family could only see by the light of a fire that quickly engulfed their horse barn. To make matters worse, the barn doors were locked and there wasn’t enough time to find the key.

“I just ran right out. I had no clothes on, no shoes, no nothing,” Macon said. Without hesitation, the heroic teen jumped into a nearby 4-wheel drive utility vehicle and drove straight through the barn wall. “I just jumped in our Gator and I just ran it right into the door,” he told local NBC affiliate WKYC Channel 3 News.

“He busted through like Rambo and opened up the end of the stalls and said, ‘Mom, this way,’” Shannon said. “And we were able to push the horses out that way.”

All 14 horses made it out unharmed, but the barn was a total loss. “It will take some time to rebuild,” Shannon said. “This was a dream. We saved and built it brick by brick. We’ll have to start over.”

Hear more about Macon’s heroic act in the news video below…Click on Image to View

http://www.thenewskiller.com/2017/11/11/16-year-old-boy-drives-burning-barn-wall-save-14-trapped-clydesdale-horses/

East Texas Equine Evacuation / Disaster Relief Network

“Elaine Nash is hard at it again…if you can help, please do so.” ~ R.T.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/EastTexasEquineEvacuationNetwork/

Feel Good Sunday: Pink Pinto Horse is the Result of an Honest Miscommunication

Source: The HorseChannel.com – story by By Leslie Potter

“There’s a lot of negative news and activity swirling around the world of equines so a brief second of giggles is welcomed by all.  Enjoy your human and critter family, today, as tomorrow we get back after it, my friends.  Be safe.” ~ R.T.


The story of Rosy the pink horse has provided a bit of levity as British Columbia residents deal with wildfire threat.

Out of a serious situation comes an amusing anecdote, and one very bright pink horse.

First, the serious situation. More than 200 wildfires are currently burning in vast sections of inland British Columbia, Canada. Some areas have been placed under evacuation orders as crews struggle to contain the most destructive fires.

Evacuating horses and large livestock is always a challenge in cases of natural disasters as owners may not have sufficient trailer capacity readily available, and it’s not always easy to find a safe location to take horses to. Horse owners will sometimes let their animals loose if disaster is imminent and evacuation isn’t possible. Because horses may lose halters or collars, owners will sometimes spray paint their phone number on their horses’ bodies or write it in permanent marker on a hoof so that if the horses run off, there’s a better chance they can be returned later on.

And that’s where the story of Rosy begins.

Rosy’s owner, Cindy Roddick, asked her 15-year-old son, Jacob Sharkey, to use a non-toxic spray paint to write their phone number on Rosy and the family’s other horse. But he missed an important part of the request. He didn’t get the “phone number” part, and instead covered the white parts of the pinto’s coat with bright pink paint.

It made sense to him at the time.

“I thought she told me to just spray paint the entire horse to make it visible,” Sharkey told The Canadian Press. “That way, if we had to let them go, people could find them.”

According to Global News, the paint is a non-toxic variety made specifically for marking livestock, and Sharkey is now tasked with washing it off.

In the meantime, Roddick had her daughter post a photo of rose-colored Rosy to Facebook so that others could share a laugh that came out of an otherwise stressful situation.

Tap here for more information and resources from horse-canada.com for horse owners affected by the British Columbia Wildfires.

http://www.horsechannel.com/horse-news/2017/07/pink-pinto-horse-is-the-result-of-an-honest-miscommunication.aspx