Wild Adobe Town Mares with Radio Collars Released in BLM and University of Wyoming Study

SOURCE:  Wildhoofbeats.com

“18 months is a long time to wear these old fashioned, bulky and dangerous collars.  And I hope that if any of these mares do run into trouble that the researchers at University of Wyoming are actually able to release the collars before the mares die.  I still very firmly believe that the best way to study wild horses is in the field, without capturing them and removing them from their families, without endangering their lives with these dangerous radio collars.”  –  Carol Walker

The line of vehicles

By Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

On Saturday morning, on a very cold day, I joined up with the BLM, researcher from University of Wyoming and a BLM ranger as we caravaned out to Adobe Town to release wild mares that had been fitted with radio collars on Thursday.  There were also some mares that had been being held for several weeks at the Rock Springs corrals, and I was very glad that they were finally being released.  As usual, I was the only member of the public attending.

Meryl jumps out of the trailer

Her friend is just as eager to get out

We turned off at Bitter Creek Road, and started down the road, which was in good condition until after we passed Eversole Ranch. Then, as we continued south more and more big drifts of snow covered the road.  The big truck towing the horse trailer in front was breaking through the drifts for the rest of us.  After about 10 miles, we stopped, and let out the first collared mare, a light grey color, I am calling her Meryl.  She jumped out and then her friend, a bay mare jumped out behind her.

Meryl turns to look at us

Meryl and her friend do not look concerned

Together

Even though she was being let go about 20 – 25 miles from where she had been captured, at least she had a friend with her, unlike most of the mares who had been released before, all alone.  They went a little way from the trailer, then turned around and looked at us, then casually strolling and exploring.  They did not seem alarmed.

We got back into our vehicles, then stopped after 2 miles.  After checking with the researcher, we got back in – despite the worsening road conditions he wanted us to go further away – they want these mares collars to be “spread out.”  We kept going another 2 miles until stopping at a big snow drift – the truck and trailer were stuck in a huge snow drift!  So they decided to let the remaining mares out here, just past Cow Camp, a collection of old derelict buildings.

A sorrel mare jumps out first

The mare with the radio collar and friend

Read the rest of this article HERE.

HWAC and CQHA, Unhappy About Anti-Slaughter Bills, Write Letters of Protest to Ag-Canada

“Slaughter Update from our good friends across our Northern Border” ~ R.T.

Canadian Horse Defence Coalition's Blog

It’s clear that the pro-slaughter Horse Welfare Alliance of Canada (HWAC) and the Canadian Quarter Horse Association (CQHA) read the CHDC blog,  because they’ve recently sent two letters to the Honorable Lawrence MacAulay, P.C, MP, Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in an apparent urgent state of mind, to persuade the Liberal government to reject future anti-slaughter Bills.  MP MacAulay did vote in favour of Bill C-571 as did all the Liberals present for the vote,  so they have just cause for concern.

HWAC has been pretty quiet recently,  but they’ve added a few more directors and appear to be ramping up of late.  In fact, HWAC has been meeting with Equestrian Canada in Ottawa recently on traceability issues. They also sent a letter requesting that they be consulted on Federal Transport Regulations for equines,  stating:

“Information gathered to date with processing plant attendees, indicate there are no records…

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Kentucky legislature setting the stage for the slaughter of horses with SB 139

Some very timely and horrendous information from our good friends over to Tuesday’s Horse! – R.T.

Tuesday's Horse

FRANKFORT, KY — Kentucky is marketed as the Horse Capital of the World, the State with “unbridled spirit”, as seen in its logo.

Tragically, this unbridled spirit does not extend to the safety, well-being and benevolent treatment of the horses it so proudly hails as an integral part of its history, economy and culture.

Kentucky is renowned for its lack of animal protection laws and that extends to its horses. According to some, Kentucky ranks in the bottom five in animal welfare but most recently there have been claims it is at the very bottom.

Here are two examples involving racehorses. There are many more.

1. There is nothing on the books that governs how many times a racehorse can be whipped or for how long before it becomes cruelty or abuse, a Churchill Downs veterinarian smirked several years ago.

2. When PeTA exposed horrific acts of cruelty exposed in…

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