BLM & Jay D’Ewart: Did the Salt Wells wild horses really increase by 522% in only one year?

Adobe Town wild horses (photo: Carol Walker)

Comments & Guest OpED by Bonnie Kohleriter

TO:         Jay D’Ewart, Wild Horse and Burro Specialist (See also cc below) 4700 (WYD04)

FROM:   Bonnie Kohleriter

RE:         Response to EA DOI-BLM-WY-D040-2017-0022EA    2017 AML Gather EA

This EA proposes to round up and remove 1560 wild horses down to the supposed low AML in Adobe Town, Salt Wells, and Divide Basin Herd Management Areas (HMAs).

BACKGROUND:

The last gather and removal in these 3 HMAs was completed in October, 2014. I am looking at the number of horses reported following the gather and removal in 2014 presented in the March 2015 National Statistics as well as the number of horses reported in 2016 and 2017 National Statistics. These numbers found in the National Statistics for 2015, 2016, and 2017 were generated by Jay D’Ewart.  I assume these numbers were accurately reported. I have read no evidence in your EA as to how you arrived at these numbers or your suggested excess numbers except for you to say adjustments were made. I assume a normal growth rate is 20-25% yearly as that is what the BLM repeatedly claims, true or untrue.  In light of the Allowable Numbers (AMLs) and the National Statistics the following information is presented here:

COMMENTS:

  • In 2014 your plan was to gather and remove horses to the low AML. Yet the results show you rounded up and removed horses well below the low AML in Salt Wells and Divide Basin. The low AML for Salt Wells is 251 but you left 117. The low AML for Divide Basin is 415 but you left 195. THIS IS WRONG.
  • In 2015 in Adobe Town you logged in 602 horses but in 2016, 1030 horses with a growth rate of 71%. In 2015 in Salt Wells you logged in 117 horses but in 2016, 728 horses with a growth rate of 522%. And in 2015 in Divide Basin you logged in 195 horses but in 2016, 670 horses with a growth rate of 241%.  71%, 522%, 241% growth rates are impossible, exaggerated, and fallacious measured against accepted rates of 20-25%  THIS IS WRONG.
  • In 2016 in Adobe Town you logged in 1030 horses but in 2017, 820 horses with a negative growth rate of -20%. It looks like no horses were born in 2016 and horses were dying more than the usual? In 2016 in Divide Basin you logged in 670 horses, but again in 2017, 650 horses with a negative growth rate of -2%. Negative growth rates of 20% and 2% are highly unlikely unless a catastrophe occurred which it did not. THIS IS WRONG.
  • In your EA you claim to have made adjustments from your scoping letter numbers in March of 2017 to April of 2017. For Adobe Town your numbers are now not 820 but 1123 with a growth rate of not -20% but 8%.  For Salt Wells your numbers are now not 825 but 976 with a growth rate of not 16% but 34%.  For Divide Basin your numbers are now not 650 but 737 with a growth rate of not -2% but 13%.  All of these numbers and percentages are out of the norm except for the original growth rate of 16 % in Salt Wells…-20%, 8%, 34%, -2%, 13% are unlikely growth rates.  THIS IS WRONG.
  • With all of Jay D’Ewart’s unlikely, impossible numbers he now wants to round up and remove not 1, 029 horses but 1,560 horses in the fall of 2017. It was pointed out to him in the scoping comment period of March 2017 that the numbers of horses  stated  in Adobe Town and in Divide Basin at that time were at near high AML which did not seem to warrant a gather and removal at this time. Of course, he subsequently raised the numbers in April, 2017 so that they now reflect over high AML.
  • Jay D’Ewart appears to do the fly-overs counting numbers of horses, is in charge of the development of the environmental assessment, and is the lead in gathering and removing the wild horses. With his highly questionable and outrageous numbers, I am concerned about his using these horses in order to continue to gain for himself meaningful employment. I am not only concerned about Jay D’Ewart, but also about other BLM Wild Horse and Burro employees, wherein the norm in this agency throughout the years has been the only tool for protecting, managing, and controlling these horses and burros, that of counting them, rounding ‘em up and removing them.

7) Not only does Jay D’Ewart want to round up and remove horses in the HMAs but he wants to round up and remove horses on private lands.  This is a number he has not told us in his EA. This requesting to remove horses or burros on private lands by welfare ranchers who have both public and private land for ranching, seems to have increased in recent years.

Through the years Jay D’Ewart knows I have questioned his numbers again and again. Back when gather numbers were being shown the public as well as facilities received numbers I called Jay D’Ewart to challenge the disconnect between the two sets of numbers only to notice the change within two days. Kimberly Foster and Dennis Carpenter, the Field Managers don’t appear to question D’Ewart’s numbers, June Wendlandt, the State Lead, doesn’t appear to question D’Ewart, numbers, Alan Shepherd in the On the Range Mgmt. office in the Washington D C  which decides on who will have gathers and removals doesn’t appear to question D’Ewart’s numbers. And so the gather and removal goes on with who now knows how many horses are left in the Adobe Town, Salt Wells, and Divide Basin Herd Management Areas in Wyoming on 2.4 M acres.

Stringent oversight, accountability, and decision making in the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program needs to be improved.  Overpopulation, overpopulation seems to be the mantra of the wild horse and burro program personnel as well as of the welfare ranchers on our public lands, but how much of the so called overpopulation is a result of inflated or made up numbers due to a desire for personal gain other than doing what is right for the horses and the burros and what is right for the land.

Bonnie Kohleriter

August 10, 2017

Cc Senators Feinstein, Udall, Murkowski, and Dean Bolstad, Director of the BLM WHB Program.

BLM Issues Draft Environmental Assessment on Massive WY Wild Horse Removal

Unedited BLM Press Release

“More propaganda and ‘Fake’ statistics utilized by the BLM to destroy the wild horse herds of Wyoming!” ~ R.T.

Past BLM Wyoming Stampede ~ Photo by Carol Walker of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

ROCK SPRINGS, Wyo.Today the Bureau of Land Management released its draft environmental assessment for a proposed wild horse gather in southwest Wyoming and is seeking public input. The proposed gather will reduce wild horse populations in the Salt Wells Creek, Adobe Town and Great Divide Basin Herd Management Areas to their low Appropriate Management Levels in order to maintain healthy wild horses on healthy, productive rangelands.

Currently, public lands are home to 73,000 wild horses and burros across the west. This amounts to nearly triple the 26,715 population target that was established by the Wild-Free Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, as amended. The extensive overpopulation of wild horses and burros routinely results in their starvation and death from lack of water.

In the three HMAs affected by the proposed gather, the current, overall population of 2,836 wild horses exceeds the cumulative AML of 1,560 animals by about 80 percent. The proposed gather would remove 513 of the 1,123 wild horses present in the Adobe Town HMA, 725 of the 976 in the Salt Wells Creek HMA and 322 of the 737 in the Great Divide Basin HMA. The proposed gather would also allow the BLM to comply with the 2013 Consent Decree of Rock Springs Grazing Association v. Salazar.

The release of the draft environmental assessment launches a 30-day public review of the proposed action. Public input is valuable early in the process and will enable the BLM to develop a well-informed analysis.

Written comments should be received by August 10, 2017. All comments submitted via email should be sent to blm_wy_adobetown_saltwells_hma@blm.gov with “2017 AML Gather EA” included in the subject line. Alternatively, comments may be hand-delivered or mailed to:

BLM Rock Springs Field Office
2017 AML Gather
280 Highway 191 North
Rock Springs, WY 82901

Before including your address, phone number, email address, or other identifying information in your comment, you should be aware that your entire comment – including your identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time.  While you may ask us in your comment to withhold your identifying information from public review, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so.

For more information, please contact the BLM at 307-352-0256.

A copy of the project map and additional details can be found at: http://bit.ly/2sL83rI.

Please Comment to Protect Wyoming’s Wild Horses from the Devastating 2017 Checkerboard Roundup

Source:  wildhoofbeats.com

Adobe Town Family

by Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Please Comment by April 4, 2017 on the Checkerboard 2017 Roundup

The BLM was unable to roundup wild horses from Salt Wells Creek, Adobe Town and Great Divide Basin in 2016 because we won a lawsuit that prohibits the BLM from managing the wild horses in the Checkerboard using only Section 4 of the Wild Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act, which allows them to remove wild horses from private lands.  Because the Checkerboard includes public lands, it is illegal to manage them as if they were privately owned by the ranchers demanding these roundups.  In order to legally roundup wild horses from the Checkerboard, the BLM must prove that the numbers are above Appropriate Management Level, or AML.  Now, they are not even conducting a census to prove this, instead they are “projecting” that the horses are over the high end of AML.

Roundups cause the destruction of hundreds of wild horse families, as well as injuries and death to the horses as they are chased by helicopters and flee in terror into traps.  These captured wild horses are chased into trailers and taken away from the only home they have ever had to end up spending the rest of their days languishing in holding corrals with no shelter.  Only a lucky few are adopted by members of the public and these do not always mean good homes – the return rate back to the BLM for adopted or purchased wild horses is over 50%.  Many many of these horses will end up at slaughter in Mexico.  There is no good reason to roundup and remove these horses from Adobe Town, Salt Wells Creek and Great Divide Basin.

I have been following and observing and photographing the wild horses in these three herd management areas for the last 13 years. These horses are uniquely suited to this sometime harsh high desert environment.  They are the last three largest herds in Wyoming, and they deserve to be preserved on our public lands.  Although the Checkerboard presents challenges to BLM management because of its pattern of public alternating with private lands, that is no reason to cave into petty demands from the Rock Springs Grazing Association, which is made up from less than 25 members.  These wild horses are valuable to us, the American public, and so every effort must be made to preserve them here where they were found at the time the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act was passed.  These horses were here long before the Grazing Association, and now what needs to happen is land swaps to consolidate blocks of public land that the horses can continue to roam upon.  Managing the wild horses on the range, on our public lands where they can continue to roam free and making these necessary land swaps happen is what the BLM needs to be working on, not perpetuating this every 3 year pattern of roundup, removal, then warehouse our wild horses.  The Field Manager of the Rock Springs BLM Field Office has been quoted as saying: “For all intents and purposes, we consider the Checkerboard private.”  But it is NOT private.  In fact, over half of the Adobe Town, Salt Wells Creek and Great Divide Basin Herd Management Areas are public land, that belongs to us, the citizens of the United States of America, not the Rock Springs Grazing Association.

Great Divide Basin Family

This time, the BLM wants to remove 1029 wild horses: 584 removed from Salt Wells Creek, 210 removed from Adobe Town, and 235 removed from Great Divide Basin.

They are not even calculating their numbers from an actual aerial census – they are making these numbers up.  Every year, the BLM conducts and aerial census in late April, but now they are just “projecting” the numbers.

Read the rest of this article and find out how YOU can comment HERE.

BLM Set to Wage War on Wyoming’s Wild Horses, AGAIN!

Sources: Multiple

“Using poor science and bad numbers the BLM continues to ensure that the wild horses of Wyoming will have no families, freedom or future.  Unedited, propaganda article posted below. (Herds do not double in size every four years – Fake News)” ~ R.T.

Adobe Town ~ photo by Carol Walker

ROCK SPRINGS, Wyo.  — The Bureau of Land Management is proposing to remove about 1,000 wild horses from three herd management areas, including Adobe Town, in southwest Wyoming in order to meet population level objectives.

Kimberlee Foster, field manager for the Rock Springs BLM field office, said there are too many horses on the land, and rules require them to remove horses when they are above management levels.

Foster said the gathered horses will go to the Rock Springs Holding Facility where they will be put up for adoption.

The BLM plans to remove 210 horses from Adobe Town, 584 from Salt Wells Creek and 235 from Great Divide Basin.

There are many reasons the BLM must carefully maintain certain population ranges for wild horses in Wyoming. For one, there are no natural predators for horses in the state and equines can be prodigious breeders.

“Typically a herd management area can double in size every four or five years,” Foster told the Rawlins Daily Times (http://bit.ly/2mayVKA ).

If wild horse populations become too large, the natural forage on the land won’t be able to support them.

Herd management is based around the usage of the land, Foster said, as well as the amount of available forage for the animals. Additionally, the BLM has agreed to act to reduce herd sizes should population levels reach a certain point.

The BLM is accepting public comment until April 4 on its horse roundup plan.

Wild Adobe Town Mares with Radio Collars Released in BLM and University of Wyoming Study

SOURCE:  Wildhoofbeats.com

“18 months is a long time to wear these old fashioned, bulky and dangerous collars.  And I hope that if any of these mares do run into trouble that the researchers at University of Wyoming are actually able to release the collars before the mares die.  I still very firmly believe that the best way to study wild horses is in the field, without capturing them and removing them from their families, without endangering their lives with these dangerous radio collars.”  –  Carol Walker

The line of vehicles

By Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

On Saturday morning, on a very cold day, I joined up with the BLM, researcher from University of Wyoming and a BLM ranger as we caravaned out to Adobe Town to release wild mares that had been fitted with radio collars on Thursday.  There were also some mares that had been being held for several weeks at the Rock Springs corrals, and I was very glad that they were finally being released.  As usual, I was the only member of the public attending.

Meryl jumps out of the trailer

Her friend is just as eager to get out

We turned off at Bitter Creek Road, and started down the road, which was in good condition until after we passed Eversole Ranch. Then, as we continued south more and more big drifts of snow covered the road.  The big truck towing the horse trailer in front was breaking through the drifts for the rest of us.  After about 10 miles, we stopped, and let out the first collared mare, a light grey color, I am calling her Meryl.  She jumped out and then her friend, a bay mare jumped out behind her.

Meryl turns to look at us

Meryl and her friend do not look concerned

Together

Even though she was being let go about 20 – 25 miles from where she had been captured, at least she had a friend with her, unlike most of the mares who had been released before, all alone.  They went a little way from the trailer, then turned around and looked at us, then casually strolling and exploring.  They did not seem alarmed.

We got back into our vehicles, then stopped after 2 miles.  After checking with the researcher, we got back in – despite the worsening road conditions he wanted us to go further away – they want these mares collars to be “spread out.”  We kept going another 2 miles until stopping at a big snow drift – the truck and trailer were stuck in a huge snow drift!  So they decided to let the remaining mares out here, just past Cow Camp, a collection of old derelict buildings.

A sorrel mare jumps out first

The mare with the radio collar and friend

Read the rest of this article HERE.

The BLM Continues Lack of Transparency in Adobe Town Wild Mare Radio Collar Study

Source:  Wild Hoofbeats

 17carolwalker002-1

Only 3 mares in the trailer?

by Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

On Sunday morning I waited at the parking lot next to the corrals at the Rock Springs BLM facility. It was 1 degree above zero, and I was bundled up accordingly. I am the only member of the public there, unaffiliated with the BLM or University of Wyoming. One trailer and two trucks drive in front of me, and I am waiting for the other trailer. There are only 3 mares in this trailer, I am assuming three of the four mares that had radio collars put on on Friday. But there were 5 other mares that I had been told by Kate Schoenecker of USGS had not been collared because they were too young. In the Environmental Assessment, it states clearly that they were only going to collar mares 5 years old and older. Young mares who are still growing can be strangled by the collars. But where were the 5 other mares? They flagged me to follow, and I pulled out of the facility. When we took a break I asked where the other mares were. I was told they were still at the Rock Springs facility and they were being “re-evaluated.” What does that mean? They are either too young for the study, under 5, or they are not. Are they being kept for some other purpose? Both the EA and the BLM’s own press release state that none of the horses from Adobe Town are to be removed – they are all supposed to go back to the Herd Management Area. So what is the BLM not telling us?

These mares need to be released back to the area where they were trapped IMMEDIATELY.

17carolwalker004-1

Robin comes out of the trailer

We drove to Bitter Creek Road, which is about 30 minutes from Rock Springs, and we started down the road. After we got off of the paved portion of the road, conditions got worse, from occasional mud to water and ice flooded areas. It was a challenging drive. After we passed Eversole Ranch, about 10 miles later the trailer stopped and the first mare was released, a little bay I named Robin. She ran as fast as she could once she hit the ground, only turning back to look at us when she had gone what she thought was a safe distance. There were no other wild horses in sight, and I learned that all three of the mares had been trapped about 30 miles south of this area.

17carolwalker007-1

Robin looks back at us

We got back in our cars and continued driving for about 8 miles before stopping again to let another mare out of the trailer, this time a little sorrel I named Felicity. She turned around immediately after jumping out, looking for her friend, the grey mare in the back of the trailer. I noticed a cut over her eye that looked swollen. Any time you transport wild horses there can be injuries. It did not look deep and it did not prevent her from running off when one of the contractors shooed her away. There were no other horses around her either.

17carolwalker009

Felicity comes out of the trailer

17carolwalker010-1

Felicity looks back at her friend in the trailer

17carolwalker011-1

Felicity finally runs away

Read the rest of this story HERE, including this:

One thing that really puzzled me was that I saw piles of panels used for traps, all stacked on a semi. Neither team of contractors had a new trap set up. When I asked they told me some decision was being made at 7pm this evening, they did not tell me what. According to the BLM’s own web page on the bait trapping, they had trapped for only 5 days, starting Sunday February 5. They gathered by their own report 27 horses over the four days, and shipped 9 mares to the Rock Springs corrals. The information on the study in the EA said they would be trapping in 3-5 locations. Why then were they only trapping in two locations, and had not set up any traps after Thursday? In the EA, the BLM had written that if bait trapping “fails” they would go to a helicopter roundup. I hardly think that 5 days only is enough time to “fail.” it takes time to accustom wild horses to a trap and to let them get used to it and come in. That is what they are currently doing in Sand Wash Basin, where they have given far longer than 5 days to trap the horses.  This seems to me to be a setup to fail. If they are not continuing to bait trap then they are getting ready to bring the helicopters in. Wild horses are injured and killed when driven with helicopters. There is no justification for subjecting the wild horses of Adobe Town to a helicopter roundup when they are not even over the Appropriate Management Level for their area.

The BLM should continue to use bait trapping if they have to finish getting 16 more mares for this ill-conceived research study, or better yet, they need to go back to the drawing board and redesign the study so that the researchers use non-invasive, safe direct observation, not dangerous radio collars.

Link to Daily Gather Reports:

https://www.blm.gov/programs/wild-horse-and-burro/herd-management/gathers-and-removals/2017-Adobe-Town-Wild-Horse-Gather

Stunning Lack of Tranparancy in BLM’s and University of Wyoming’s Adobe Town Wild Horse Study

Source:  Wild Hoofbeats

b54p0090

USGS holding radio collars, the one on the right is for the study

by Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

The BLM and the University of Wyoming are conducting a Radio Collar Study on wild mares in the Adobe Town Herd Management Area. I have done several blog posts about this study, calling for people to send in comments and calling for more clarification on how this study is going to be conducted. Some of my concerns are the the health and well being of the mares that will be captured by bait trapping, trailered to Rock Springs, put into squeeze chutes and have these collars put on. These collars will remain for 2 years. Then the mares will be transported back supposedly to where they were captured and released. This alone will be very traumatic for the mares and their families who will lose a family member.

But what happens when the mare gets her foot caught in the collar, or it grows into her neck because it is being put on when she is at her thinnest, and she will put on weight in the summer especially if she is pregnant? How will they be able to release the collar if she is in trouble?

bi4i2360

Moving the mares into the shed to put collars on

These were not popular questions at the Q and A that USGS conducted yesterday at the Rock Springs corrals. I was told that they “left room” in the collars for the mares to gain weight – wouldn’t that allow her to get it caught on something more easily? And yes there were studies of mares being injured and dying in the field due to radio collars but supposedly this design was much improved. They do have a tag they can put into the mane instead but these will fall off too soon. I did ask about using direct observation as a way of gathering data but that was deemed impossible, even though it is much less intrusive. The researchers would rather track the mares on their computers rather than on the ground, in the field. I also asked weren’t they concerned about the mares being released all alone, not with their families? There was no answer to that.

bi4i2354

The geldings in the front corral know something is going on

Before I even went to Rock Springs I had been very concerned about the lack of observation of the whole process that the BLM was allowing. Public observation helps to prevent abuse of the horses, and I am a firm believer in this.  A week ago American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign asked attorney Nick Lawton of Meyer, Glizenstein& Eubanks to write a letter asking for the opportunity to observe the bait trapping and the collaring as well as the release of the mares, as well as giving sufficient notice of at least 2 days so I could get out there. The BLM did not change its stance on the bait trapping and the collaring or the notice but did say that “the mares will be held at the facility for 24 hours after they are radio collared, and the public will be able to observe the mares from the overlook during this time period.”

 b54p0092

Mares that were not collared

This did NOT happen. The mares after they were collared were being kept in a pen that was completely not visible from the overlook and when I asked it if could see the mares I was told no, that they have to be be kept quiet. Somehow all the torment that these mares went through was totally acceptable but having members of the public view them, even at a distance, was too hard on them.

bi4i2380

Where the collaring was done

I could see the heads of the mares that did not have collars on, and occasionally their bodies, using my long lens. Apparently they captured 9 mares who they brought to the facility, but 5 were too young. Even I could see one of the mares looked like a yearling or at the most a two year old filly – how on earth could the people trapping the horses not be able to tell the difference between very young and mature mares? And why put these poor young mares though the stress of taking them away from their families, hauling them to the facility then hauling them back, for nothing? If they had allowed me to observe the bait trapping I could have told them these mares were too young because I have spent 13 years observing these wild horses in Adobe Town.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HEREYou’ll want to find out more about this…

b54p0084

Tracking device to track collars on the ground

http://www.wildhoofbeats.com/blog/stunning-lack-of-tranparancy-in-blms-and-university-of-wyomings-adobe-town-wild-horse-study

Carol Walker on the BLM’s dangerous Radio Collar Study on Adobe Town wild horses, on Wild Horse & Burro Radio (Wed., 2/8/17)

painy

Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_LogoJoin us on Wild Horse Wednesdays®, Feb. 8, 2017

6:00 pm PST … 7:00 pm MST … 8:00 pm CST … 9:00 pm EST

Listen to the archived show (HERE!)

You can also listen to the show on your phone by calling (917) 388-4520.

You can call in with questions during the 2nd half hour, by dialing (917) 388-4520, then pressing 1.

This show will be archived so you can listen to it anytime.

unnamed

Wild family in Adobe Town, mare in front (photo: Carol Walker)

Our guest tonight will be Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation.  The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is proceeding with a Radio Collar Study of wild mares in the Adobe Town Herd Management despite overwhelming public comment against it and an IBLA Appeal that was filed.  The BLM plans to use bait trapping to capture 30 wild mares in 3-5 different areas within the HMA to track movement.  Huge concerns have been raised about the welfare and safety of the mares because Radio collars are dangerous and can cause injury and death.  Carol Walker has spent 13 years observing and photographing wild horses in Adobe Town.

This show is hosted by Debbie Coffey, V.P. & Dir. of Wild Horse Affairs, Wild Horse Freedom Federation.

To contact us: ppj1@hush.com, or call 320-281-0585

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/marti-oakley/2017/02/09/carol-walker-on-blms-dangerous-radio-collar-study-on-adobe-town-wild-horses

TO LISTEN TO ALL ARCHIVED WILD HORSE & BURRO RADIO SHOWS, CLICK HERE.

1/20/16 – Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, on BLM’s plans to sterilize wild horse and burros. Listen HERE.

1/27/16 – Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, on threats to shoot wild burros in Arizona. Listen HERE.

2/8/16 – Representatives of 4 major wild horse & burro advocacy groups and advocates speak out against BLM’s plans for barbaric sterilization experiments on wild mares. Listen HERE.

2/10/16 – Jonathan Ratner, Western Watersheds Project’s Director for Wyoming, Utah and Colorado, talks about the environmental toll of privately owned livestock grazing on public lands. Listen HERE.

2/24/16 – Kirsten Stade, Advocacy Director for Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER), on BLM’s skewed data minimizing the effects of livestock grazing on public lands. Listen HERE.

3/2/16 – Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, Equine Mgr. of Todd Mission Ranch (TMR Rescue) & founder of Wild Burro Protection League, joined by local wild burro advocates fighting to save the wild burros of the Black Mountain Herd Management Area in Arizona. Listen HERE.

3/23/16 – Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation interviews Susan W. Watt, Executive Director, Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary, located in South Dakota. Listen HERE.

5/4/16 – Gail A. Eisnitz, author of the book “Slaughterhouse” and Chief Investigator for the Humane Farming Association (HFA). Listen HERE.

6/22/16 – Charlotte Roe, Founder of Wild Equid League of Colorado, on BLM’s cruel experiments on wild horses and burros, including sterilization of pregnant wild mares, that are a launching pad for widespread use as “population suppression.” Listen HERE.

8/3/16 – Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, Equine Mgr. of Todd Mission Ranch (TMR Rescue) & founder of Wild Burro Protection League with guests. Listen HERE.

8/10/16 – Gene Baur, Pres. & Co-Founder of Farm Sanctuary, on factory farming and the Farm Sanctuary. Listen HERE.

8/17/16 – Advocates Carla Bowers and Bonnie Kohleriter on why 83% of wild horse and burro herds are on the brink of collapse. Listen HERE.

8/31/16 – Steve Hindi (President and Founder) and Janet Enoch (Investigator) of SHowing Animals Respect & Kindness (SHARK) on rodeo cruelty and more. You can see all of SHARK’s rodeo exposés on YouTube by clicking here. Listen HERE.

9/7/16 – Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation , on BLM plans to remove all wild horses from three of the largest remaining herds in Wyoming. Listen HERE.

9/14/16 – Susan Wagner, Pres. & Founder of Equine Advocates, on how the upcoming Presidential election can affect the fate of wild and domestic equines and horse slaughter. PLEASE SIGN EQUINE ADVOCATES’ PETITION HERE. Listen HERE.

9/21/16 – Mae Lee Sun, co-author of “Brumby: A celebration of Australia’s wild horses” and Craig Downer, wildlife ecologist and the author of the book “The Wild Horse Conspiracy” on the culling of the brumbies (wild horses) of the Snowy Mountains in New South Wales. Listen HERE.

9/28/16 – Laird Lucas (Executive Director) and Talasi Brooks (Staff Attorney) of Advocates for the West, a public interest, nonprofit environmental law firm with an 85% record of legal success protecting the wildlife and wild places of the American West. Listen HERE.

10/5/16 – Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, Equine Mgr. of Todd Mission Ranch (TMR Rescue) & founder of Wild Burro Protection League reports on the 2016 Donkey Welfare Symposium. Listen HERE.

10/12/16 – Nancy Watson, President of SAFE Food SAFE Horses Coalition, has been raising worldwide awareness to the loopholes in U.S. legislation that allows U.S. equines (horses, donkeys, mules and burros) which are laden with pharmaceuticals, into the global food supply. Listen HERE.

10/26/16 – Hilary Wood, Pres. and Founder of Front Range Equine Rescue (FRER) and Bruce Wagman, a partner with Schiff Hardin law firm in San Francisco, talk about the BLM, horse slaughter and more. Listen HERE.

11/2/16 – Craig Downer, wildlife ecologist and author of the book “The Wild Horse Conspiracy.” Listen HERE.

11/16/16 – Elaine Nash, Founder and Director of Fleet of Angels, a grassroots movement of horse lovers who own trailers and help transport equines to safety when their lives are in danger, on recent rescue efforts. Listen HERE.

11/30/16 – Keith Nakatani, California Oil & Gas Program Manager, and Matt Davis, California Communications Director, of Clean Water Action, on fracking wastewater being used to irrigate crops, and aquifer exemptions that allow certain oil and gas and mining activity to occur in groundwater that would otherwise be protected as a drinking water source. Listen HERE.

12/7/16 – Nick Jans, author of “A Wolf Called Romeo.” Listen HERE.

12/14/16 – Amy Hanchey, Pres. of Pegasus Equine Guardian Association, that is striving to protect the wild horses on the main post at Fort Polk, Louisiana. Listen HERE.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save