A Wild Horse Release is a Bittersweet Reminder of Those Who Are No Longer Free

Source:  wildhoofbeats.com

A Wild Horse Release is a Bittersweet Reminder of Those Who Are No Longer Free

by Carol J. Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

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This morning the BLM allowed me to watch the release of the 6 Curlies that were released back into Salt Wells Creek.  Of course I much prefer watching wild horses be released than be rounded up, but as much as I was elated for these 6 lucky horses, I was very sad for those they left behind at the holding facility.

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Ike in the trailer

Ike in the trailer

I was not sure which horses were going to be released, but when I asked at 6:30 at the BLM office I was told no pintos were to be released but some curlies.  This meant Maestro would not be released, much to the disappointment of local people who consider him a favorite.

Mares get out

Mares get out

Mares run

Mares run

We stopped on County Road 76 off of Hwy 430.  These horses had been captured near Maggie Springs off 191, so it was not where they were captured.  However, the BLM had not rounded up any horses off County Road 76 so there should be other wild horses around – I saw fresh manure and knew I was right.  The trailer went down the road making sure that the road was still good and not too muddy, then they called for us to follow.  They put us at the top of the hill and as it turns out it was the wrong side of the road, but I did the best I could to take photos in such a way that people could identify the horses.  As it turns out they were all curlies.  The two black mares got out first as they were in their own compartment in the back.  They ran as soon as they got out, two big girls who reminded me of war horses in their outlines.        READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE.

More Wild Horses Including Curlies Lose Their Freedom in Salt Wells Creek

Source:  wildhoofbeats.com

Wild Horses Including Curlies Lose Their Freedom in Salt Wells Creek

by Carol J. Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Maestro and a yearling

Maestro and a yearling

Yesterday I went out to see wild horses that were still free after the horrible morning watching 167 get captured. It usually serves as a balm and helps combat the feelings of helplessness generated by watching large groups of wild horses that should never be captured rounded u with helicopters. But this time I knew that freedom was fleeting for these horses. I had heard that the BLM was going to round up horses the next day who were near the 191 highway in Salt Wells Creek because some horses had been killed on the highway and it was a hazard for public safety. We passed a game warden who told us that there was a big group at the top of the hill.

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Sure enough, once we wound our way up the hill we saw a large group of wild horses grazing behind a fence on a flat area. I parked and we walked out toward them. The horses were completely unconcerned by our approach.

Little black foal nursing

Little black foal nursing

Curly mare and foal

Curly mare and foal

Many foals were lying down napping, and I spotted a bald faced sorrel mare who had a tiny foal nursing. He or she looked to be less than a week old. I was concerned about the little one’s ability to run from the helicopter the next day and decided to let them know about this foal so they would hopefully look out for it. As we were watching I realized that many of these horses were Curlies, with curly coats and manes. Here is a link for information on them: www.curlyhorses.com

Maestro chasing off another stallion

Maestro chasing off another stallion

There was an impressive bay stallion with a very wavy curly mane and there was a gorgeous pinto stallion red and white, who really seemed to be the big boss, who I learned was named Maestro.    READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE.