Ladd Drummond, BLM wild horse holding facility contractor, and wife Ree Drummond (The Pioneer Woman) interviewed at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association convention

Here is a youtube video of an interview with Ree Drummond (The Pioneer Woman) and her husband Ladd Drummond, a BLM contractor who has been paid over $20 million by taxpayers to warehouse wild horses on his private property, at the recent annual convention of the wild horse hating, horse slaughter pushing, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association:

Ree Drummond was a keynote speaker at this event.

Ree Drummond (The Pioneer Woman), wife of Ladd Drummond, a BLM wild horse holding facility contractor, was keynote speaker at the 2018 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association convention

Ree Drummond on the stage at the 2018 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association convention

by Debbie Coffey

On Ree Drummond’s blog (The Pioneer Woman), under a photo of the fancy boots she wore to speak at the 2018 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association convention, Ree states:

“Finally, I shared this on Facebook but wanted to share it here too: I did not grow up in the country.  I can’t saddle a horse.  For years I thought heifer and Hereford were the same word.  And last week I delivered the keynote address to the big, annual gathering of the National Cattlemen’s Association.  I don’t do many speaking gigs these days because it takes precious time away from my teenagers, but this was one that Ladd and I could attend together, and we enjoyed the quick trip to Phoenix and back.  The irony of me speaking to 3,500 cattlemen and cattlewomen was not lost on me, and it was an honor to speak about how much I’ve enjoyed sharing glimpses of ranch life on my blog, TV show, and social media for the past twelve (!) years.  And at the very least, I was banking on these boots making up for all my agricultural shortcomings.”

In a classic example of irony, Ree stands in front of the sign “Cattle First.”

Ree Drummond uses the images of wild horses in promoting her cooking show, The Pioneer Woman, on packaging for her Pioneer Woman cookware products, in her Pioneer Woman cookbooks and on her Pioneer Woman blog.

All the while, Drummond Land & Cattle Co., co-owned by Ree’s husband, Ladd Drummond, has been paid over $20 million in taxpayer dollars to warehouse captured wild horses on his private property as a Bureau of Land Management off-range pasture contractor.  (Talk about buttering your bread on both sides.)

Yet, it’s not likely that Ree said a word about saving America’s wild horses during her keynote speech to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.

For many years, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) has been pushing for the slaughter of America’s wild horses & burros, and their organization was listed on the Steering Committee of the secretive “Slaughter Summit” held in Utah in 2017.  The NCBA also “applauded” the recent Stewart Amendment that would allow all wild horses & burros in BLM holding facilities, and tens of thousands more on public lands, to be killed.

Ree uses wild horses to promote her business interests, and yet at this time of crisis for America’s wild horses & burros, she seems to support the organization that is pushing for their mass killing.

Ree received a Distinguished Service Award from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association

 

Beef, agriculture industries upset with dietary guidelines that consider environmental impact

Privately owned welfare cattle being herded onto public land and wild horse habitat  ~  photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Privately owned welfare cattle being herded onto public land and wild horse habitat ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

“A study by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences last year said raising beef for the American dinner table is more harmful to the environment than other meat industries such as pork and chicken.

The study said that compared with other popular animal proteins, beef produces more heat-trapping gases per calorie, puts out more water-polluting nitrogen, takes more water for irrigation and uses more land.”

By Mary Clare Jalonick, The Associated Press

WASHINGTON – The government issues dietary guidelines every five years to encourage Americans to eat healthier. This year’s version may look at what is healthy for the environment, too.

A new focus on the environment would mean asking people to choose more fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains and other plant-based foods — possibly at the expense of meat.

The beef and agriculture industries are crying foul, saying an environmental agenda has no place in what has always been a practical blueprint for a healthy lifestyle.

An advisory panel to the Agriculture and Health and Human Services Departments has been discussing the idea of sustainability in public meetings, indicating that its recommendations, expected this month, may address the environment. The two departments will take those recommendations into account as they craft the final dietary guidelines, expected by the end of the year.

The guidelines are the basis for USDA’s “My Plate” icon that replaced the well-known food pyramid in 2010 and is designed to help Americans with healthy eating. The guidelines will also be integrated into school lunch meal patterns and other federal eating programs.

A draft recommendation circulated by the advisory committee in December said a sustainable diet helps ensure food access for both the current population and future generations. A dietary pattern higher in plant-based foods and lower in animal-based foods is “more health promoting and is associated with lesser environmental impact than is the current average U.S. diet,” the draft said.

That appears to take at least partial aim at the beef industry. A study by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences last year said raising beef for the American dinner table is more harmful to the environment than other meat industries such as pork and chicken.

The study said that compared with other popular animal proteins, beef produces more heat-trapping gases per calorie, puts out more water-polluting nitrogen, takes more water for irrigation and uses more land.

As the advisory committee has discussed the idea, doctors and academics on the panel have framed sustainability in terms of conserving food resources and also what are the healthiest foods. There is “compatibility and overlap” between what’s good for health and good for the environment, the panel has said.

The meat industry has fought for years to ensure that the dietary guidelines do not call for eating less meat. The guidelines now recommend eating lean meats instead of reducing meat altogether, advice that the current advisory committee has debated. A draft discussed at the panel’s Dec. 15 meeting says a healthy dietary pattern includes fewer “red and processed meats” than are currently consumed.

After that meeting, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association sent out a statement by doctor and cattle producer Richard Thorpe calling the committee biased and the draft meat recommendations absurd. He said lean beef has a role in healthy diets.

The American Meat Institute issued comments calling any attempt to take lean meat out of a healthy dietary pattern “stunning” and “arbitrary.”

Objections are coming from Congress, too.

A massive year-end spending bill enacted last month noted the advisory committee’s interest in the environment and directed Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack “to only include nutrition and dietary information, not extraneous factors” in final guidelines. Congress often uses such non-binding directions to put a department on notice that lawmakers will push back if the executive branch moves forward.

Environmentalists are pushing the committee and the government to go the route being considered.

“We need to make sure our diets are in alignment with our natural resources and the need to reduce climate change,” said Kari Hamerschlag of the advocacy group Friends of the Earth.

Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest said the idea of broader guidelines isn’t unprecedented. They have already been shaped to address physical activity and food safety, he said.

“You don’t want to recommend a diet that is going to poison the planet,” he said.

BLM: Humboldt Herd Area Wild Horse Trapping Suspended

Information supplied by the Nevada office of the BLM

the area is managed for zero wild horses”

Wild Horse Trapping Update

The Humboldt wild horse water bait trap operations have been temporarily suspended since trapped numbers have been relatively low over the last three days. Trapping operations will continue on July 7, 2014 with the anticipation that the horses will be more accustomed to the trap facilities. As of June 27, BLM has gathered a total of 37 horses out of 100.

Goal of Trapping:

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Winnemucca District, Humboldt River Field Office will use water trapping to achieve and maintain a population of zero wild horses within the Humboldt Herd Area (HA). The Humboldt HA is not managed for wild horses due to the checkerboard land pattern and therefore no AML has been set and the area is managed for zero wild horses. The water trap gather is taking place as a result of impacts to private property. This action was analyzed as part of the Humboldt Herd Area Wild Horse Gather Plan Environmental Assesment.

Details of the Trapping:

BLM plans to humanely trap approximately 100 wild horses through the use of water trapping. Details of the gather are available on this website by following the links in the right column.

Adoption:

Wild horses removed from the range will be sent to the Palomino Valley National Wild Horse and Burro Adoption Center (PVC) outside of Reno, Nevada. PVC is open to the public Monday – Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and on the first Saturday of the month, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. For adoption details and more information about PVC, visit: http://on.doi.gov/1qeweUJ.

Latest News:

For BLM news releases and statements issued, check our Newsroom.

Background:

The Humboldt HA is located approximately 30 miles south of Winnemucca, Nevada and extends along the east side of Interstate 80 to Lovelock, Nevada. The Humboldt HA was not designated for the long term management of the wild horses in the Sonoma-Gerlach Management Framework Plan (SG-MFP) due to the checkerboard land pattern found within the HA and therefore, is not managed for wild horses and burros.

The trap area is comprised of 431,544 acres of both private and public lands. The wild horse population within the Humboldt HA is estimated to be 282 animals. The exact origin of these wild horses has not been determined. However, some animals may have been missed in the initial gather to remove wild horses from the area in 1985. Other wild horses may have migrated into the Humboldt HA from adjacent Herd Management Areas (HMAs). Removing these wild horses will help to prevent further deterioration of the range in an effort to achieve a thriving natural ecological balance and multiple-use relationship as required under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, and Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976, as well as help to achieve and maintain healthy, viable wild horse populations.

For more information on the Wild Horse and Burro Program, call 1-866-468-7826 or email wildhorse@blm.gov.

NCBA Official has ‘Reservations’ about Salazar Replacement

By of Brownfield Ag News for America

Cattlemen’s Beef Association Ain’t Happy, Shucks!

Sally JewellThe director of federal lands for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association is expressing “reservations” about the nomination of Sally Jewell to be the next Secretary of the Interior.

Speaking with Brownfield at the Cattle Industry Convention in Tampa, Dustin Van Liew says while he likes Jewell’s private sector experience, he does have some concerns with her ties to organizations that advocate restrictions on the use of federal lands for grazing and other uses.

AUDIO: Dustin Van Liew (4:20 MP3)

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