Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, with updates on latest BLM roundups of wild horses in Wyoming, and the lawsuit filed to try to stop it (Wed., 10/11/17 on Wild Horse & Burro Radio)

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Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_LogoJoin us on Wild Horse Wednesdays®, this Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017

6:00 p.m. PST … 7:00 p.m. MST … 8:00 p.m. CST … 9:00 p.m. EST

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Wild horses on the way into the BLM’s trap

Our guest tonight is Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation. Carol will give you an update on the Bureau of Land Management’s latest roundups of wild horses in Wyoming. Carol will also tell you about the lawsuit filed to stop the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) from illegally rounding up hundreds of wild horses in a helicopter capture operation currently underway in southwestern Wyoming. Carol is a co-Plaintiff in that lawsuit.

These wild horses could soon end up in the slaughter pipeline unless you call your U.S. Senators to tell them not to euthanize, kill or sterilize our wild horses, and that you oppose horse slaughter in the U.S.

Carol’s website is http://www.wildhoofbeats.com/ and you can see her photography of wild horses at http://www.livingimagescjw.com/

This show will be hosted by Debbie Coffey (V.P. and Dir. of Wild Horse Affairs) of Wild Horse Freedom Federation.

To contact us: ppj1@hush.com

TO LISTEN TO ALL ARCHIVED WILD HORSE & BURRO RADIO SHOWS, CLICK HERE. Continue reading

A Wild Horse Release is a Bittersweet Reminder of Those Who Are No Longer Free

Source:  wildhoofbeats.com

A Wild Horse Release is a Bittersweet Reminder of Those Who Are No Longer Free

by Carol J. Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

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This morning the BLM allowed me to watch the release of the 6 Curlies that were released back into Salt Wells Creek.  Of course I much prefer watching wild horses be released than be rounded up, but as much as I was elated for these 6 lucky horses, I was very sad for those they left behind at the holding facility.

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Ike in the trailer

Ike in the trailer

I was not sure which horses were going to be released, but when I asked at 6:30 at the BLM office I was told no pintos were to be released but some curlies.  This meant Maestro would not be released, much to the disappointment of local people who consider him a favorite.

Mares get out

Mares get out

Mares run

Mares run

We stopped on County Road 76 off of Hwy 430.  These horses had been captured near Maggie Springs off 191, so it was not where they were captured.  However, the BLM had not rounded up any horses off County Road 76 so there should be other wild horses around – I saw fresh manure and knew I was right.  The trailer went down the road making sure that the road was still good and not too muddy, then they called for us to follow.  They put us at the top of the hill and as it turns out it was the wrong side of the road, but I did the best I could to take photos in such a way that people could identify the horses.  As it turns out they were all curlies.  The two black mares got out first as they were in their own compartment in the back.  They ran as soon as they got out, two big girls who reminded me of war horses in their outlines.        READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE.

More Wild Horses Including Curlies Lose Their Freedom in Salt Wells Creek

Source:  wildhoofbeats.com

Wild Horses Including Curlies Lose Their Freedom in Salt Wells Creek

by Carol J. Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Maestro and a yearling

Maestro and a yearling

Yesterday I went out to see wild horses that were still free after the horrible morning watching 167 get captured. It usually serves as a balm and helps combat the feelings of helplessness generated by watching large groups of wild horses that should never be captured rounded u with helicopters. But this time I knew that freedom was fleeting for these horses. I had heard that the BLM was going to round up horses the next day who were near the 191 highway in Salt Wells Creek because some horses had been killed on the highway and it was a hazard for public safety. We passed a game warden who told us that there was a big group at the top of the hill.

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Sure enough, once we wound our way up the hill we saw a large group of wild horses grazing behind a fence on a flat area. I parked and we walked out toward them. The horses were completely unconcerned by our approach.

Little black foal nursing

Little black foal nursing

Curly mare and foal

Curly mare and foal

Many foals were lying down napping, and I spotted a bald faced sorrel mare who had a tiny foal nursing. He or she looked to be less than a week old. I was concerned about the little one’s ability to run from the helicopter the next day and decided to let them know about this foal so they would hopefully look out for it. As we were watching I realized that many of these horses were Curlies, with curly coats and manes. Here is a link for information on them: www.curlyhorses.com

Maestro chasing off another stallion

Maestro chasing off another stallion

There was an impressive bay stallion with a very wavy curly mane and there was a gorgeous pinto stallion red and white, who really seemed to be the big boss, who I learned was named Maestro.    READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE.

Losing the Beautiful Wild Horses of Salt Wells Creek

Source:  wildhoofbeats.com

Losing the Beautiful Wild Horses of Salt Wells Creek

by Carol J. Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

 A grey stallion at dawn

A grey stallion at dawn

His family

His family

Just after dawn we arrived at Bitter Creek Road, way down Highway 430 in Salt Wells Creek, Wyoming.  I was dreading this day when the helicopters would be taking most of the wild horses in this area, within sight of Kinney Rim.

We saw a small family right by the road as we were driving in, and it was sad to see how unafraid the horses were when we got out of our cars to photograph them.

The little family I knew leading the way

The little family I knew leading the way

On the way to the trap

On the way to the trap

We drove down the road to a gas pad with a view of the run into the trap and I set up my tripod and camera and lens and waited for the helicopters.  This was the closest we had been to the trap.  When we saw a line of horses in the distance, I watched as they got closer and I realized it was a huge group of horses.  As they came closer, it hit me.  This beautiful little family I had spent time with last week with an older Cremello mare, older grey stallion and beautiful palomino yearling were leading the way to the trap.  I had hoped that they would be among the lucky ones, and I despaired because those two older horses would not have a chance of being adopted especially if the stallion was sent to Axtell, Utah and the mare possibly sent to Bruneau, Idaho.  The BLM does not allow public visitation and adoption at their private facilities.

Another large group coming in

Another large group coming in

The palomino and cremello stallions rearing up to fight

The palomino and cremello stallions rearing up to fight

Running away

Running away

In the trap

In the trap

After this group came in soon afterward, an even larger group approached.  Then I saw a Cremello stallion  and a Palomino stallion touched noses then reared up, clearly unhappy to have their families close together.  I thought that they had much bigger problems, like the helicopter chasing them.   READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE.

The Checkerboard Wild Horse Roundup in Wyoming Doesn’t Look Any Better at a Distance

Source:  wildhoofbeats.com

The horses look like ants

The horses look like ants

The Checkerboard Wild Horse Roundup Doesn’t Look Any Better from a Distance

by Carol J. Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Today we were placed 3 miles from the trap site above the Eversole Ranch in Salt Wells Creek. I could barely make out the little ant sized horses in the viewfinder despite my very long lens. I could only tell if the horses were dark or light colored, and make guesses about how many there were.

With the helicopter

With the helicopter

Going into the trap

Going into the trap

After a frustrating 3 hours trying to keep track of horses very far away, we were told that we had the option to go to temporary holding so we could see the horses that had been rounded up so far today before they were loaded up and trucked off to one of two long term holding facilities that would not allow visits from the public. Since we had not gotten any sort of useful view of the horses I jumped at the chance.

We had a far better view of the pronghorn antelope family

We had a far better view of the pronghorn antelope family

While we were waiting for the Cattoors to process the horses so we could be let in to see them, we watched an antelope family move to a puddle to drink.

The stallions

The stallions

Once we were allowed in to see the horses, we walked around looking first at the mares. All but one of the foals had been weaned and were separated from their mothers for the first time. One mare with a collar from the Adobe Town Radio collar study had been captured. I asked about the mares who had been captured last week with collars and was told they had been released back into Adobe Town.

The foals

The foals

More foals

More foals

Read the rest of this article HERE.

Please Comment on BLM’s Plans to Destroy and Slaughter Three Herds of Wild Horses in the Wyoming Checkerboard

Source:  wildhoofbeats.com

by Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation, Wild Horse Freedom Federation

It is a very familiar and unwelcome feeling that I have, writing about the BLM’s plans to roundup and remove over 55% of the wild horses in the Wyoming Checkerboard. It seems like just yesterday I was writing about this plan that affects wild horses on 2.4 million acres in Adobe Town, Salt Wells Creek and Great Divide Basin. The last roundup was in 2014 when 1263 wild horses were removed from their homes and lands. 14 died during the roundup and over 100 died in short term holding facilities in the four months following the roundup.

This time, however, the situation facing the wild horses in Adobe Town, Salt Wells Creek and Greek Divide Basin is much more dire. The consequences of being rounded up and removed from public lands could not be more serious because right now the BLM is asking Congress to lift the restrictions on killing and slaughtering wild horses, and every one of the 1560 wild horses that the BLM is planning to remove is facing imminent death. The BLM does not consider in its Environmental Assessments what will happen to the wild horses that are removed according to their Proposed Actions. They do not care about the suffering, illnesses and deaths of the horses and they do not care about you and I, the taxpayers, funding a lifetime of each horse being kept in pens, in captivity. It is a wasteful, cruel and insane policy that favors overwhelmingly corrupt livestock interests who get to graze and overgraze their private livestock on our lands, losing millions of dollars on this program each year.

In this Proposed Action, the BLM is pandering to the Rock Springs Grazing Association, which only has 24 members, and whose grazing rights on public land are a privilege, not a right – but they don’t see it that way. Land swaps could have easily solved the problem of the checkerboard of public and private lands, but it is not in their interests to cooperate. They want to control all the land. And they want the horses gone at any cost. But 70% of the land, of the 2.4 million acres in Adobe Town, Salt Wells Creek and Great Divide Basin is public land. It should not be managed as if it were all private land, but it is. We stopped the 2016 Checkerboard Roundup because we won an appeal which said that the BLM cannot manage all these lands as if they were private.

This time, we need your help to speak up, write the BLM and demand that they select Alternative C – no roundup or removal.

The BLM should not be allowed to move forward with this roundup only on the basis of an Environmental Assessment.

Read the rest of this article HERE.

http://www.wildhoofbeats.com/blog/please-comment-on-blms-plans-to-destroy-and-slaughter-three-herds-of-wild-horses-in-the-wyoming-checkerboard

Carol Walker, Plaintiff in Lawsuit to Stop Wyoming Roundups, on why this fight is personal

Wild Horses: Fighting to Save Wyoming’s Wild Horses is Personal

By Carol Walker, Director of Field Documentation, Wild Horse Freedom Federation

An Adobe Town Band Stallion Leads the Way

An Adobe Town Band Stallion Leads His Family

The fight to stop the BLM from its plan to eradicate wild horses from private and public land in three herds in the Red Desert of Wyoming is personal for me. On my first trip to Adobe Town in 2004, I fell in love with a gentle, battle-scarred grey stallion and his small, beautiful family. He ran right up to me and I waited, not knowing that this encounter would change my life forever. His filly came up next to her father and it looked as though she grinned at me. I had to keep coming back to see them, learn more about their lives, and photograph them as they as they are best portrayed, wild and free, at home in the dry, dramatic and isolated landscape of the Red Desert. I wrote my first book, Wild Hoofbeats: America’s Vanishing Wild Horses to let people know how magnificent these horses are, and that they deserve to live free.

The Grey Stallion and His Filly

The Grey Stallion and His Filly

Over the past 10 years I have traveled to Adobe Town, Salt Wells Creek, and Great Divide Basin in all seasons of the year, even the depths of winter. One overwhelming thing stands out for me, after having driven thousands of miles on unmarked dirt roads in these Herd Management Areas – these horses are uniquely suited to this harsh and forbidding landscape and they belong there. They belong there more than the invasive and destructive cattle and sheep, and more than the land wrecking oil and gas drilling.

Four Grey Mares Run from the Helicopter in Adobe Town in 2010

Four Grey Mares Run from the Helicopter in Adobe Town in 2010

I am a plaintiff on a lawsuit to stop the BLM from removing over 800 wild horses from Adobe Town, Salt Wells Creek, and Great Divide Basin. The roundups are scheduled to start in two weeks. http://www.blm.gov/wy/st/en/info/news_room/2014/july/18rsfo-removal.html

Without any care for Environmental Analysis, land use planning, or NEPA, the BLM announced its plans to proceed with these roundups and gave the public no opportunity to comment on their plans. Of course, the BLM ignores public comments anyway, but we were not even allowed to make our voices heard. The roundup was announced only 1 month before the start date, barely time to get a lawsuit in place, but we did, and the violations of the law and procedure are so glaring that I believe we have a very good chance of winning and stopping the BLM in its tracks.

READ THE REST OF THIS STORY AND FIND OUT WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP HERE.

Carol Walker’s blog is wildhoofbeats.com

Carol’s website is www.livingimagescjw.com