Horse News

Ranchers vs Wild Horses: Pure BS


 

“Avid readers and researchers brought this article to our attention WITH commentary. Often times we issue a “tissue” alert before reading a touching article; not so in this case, instead we will formerly issue a “GAG” alert as anything that is in your alimentary canal may want to take a fast exit after reading the facts about why ranchers really want wild horses removed.” ~ R.T.


 

http://www.opb.org/news/article/running-from-drought-dry-conditions-force-wild-horses-onto-private-land/

Herald And News: Dry Conditions Force Wild Horses Onto Private Land

The Klamath Falls Herald and News | July 12, 2014 8 p.m. | Updated: July 14, 2014 3:37 p.m. | Dorris, California

Contributed By:

LACEY JARRELL H&N Staff Reporter

http://www.opb.org/images/fetch/c_limit,g_center,h_350,q_90,w_220/http%3A/s3.amazonaws.com/p2x-photos/787a5bb4d6cb4be37bc32248228af15b_original.jpg

Roger Porterfield was a courteous, but reluctant host when 90 uninvited guests began showing up at his ranch, grazing his land and depleting his water holes. Even as the guests brazenly took hay from his cattle feeders day after day, Porterfield accommodated them, until one day enough was enough and he asked them to leave.

In late 2013, Porterfield, of Porterfield Ranch in Dorris, Calif., filed an official complaint with the Bureau of Land Management stating wild horses were moving off the nearby Red Rocks Lakes Herd Management Area and onto his property in search of food and water. At the time, Porterfield noted about 30 to 40 horses were bypassing his fences and helping themselves to his livestock stores.

“Feed and water are crucial for the ranch operation, especially in drought years,” the complaint read. “This situation is totally unacceptable.”

On June 10, BLM officials surveyed the 18,000-acre Red Rocks site and discovered all of its 17 water sources — including the area’s two namesake Red Rock Lakes — were completely dry.

“There’s not even mud in them,” said Doug Satica, manager of Litchfield Wild Horse and Burro Facility near Susanville, Calif.

Just two days later, the agency approved Porterfield’s complaint and began removing wild horses from his ranch. In all, 90 were collected — 30 studs, 45 mares, and 15 foals — and transported 170 miles to the Litchfield Wild Horse and Burro Facility, where they are awaiting adoption.

“Like the rest of the West, it’s abnormally dry. Northern California, by most accounts, is having one of the driest seasons on record,” said Jeff Fontana, BLM Northern California District public information officer.

Water sources dry up

The Red Rocks Lakes BLM Herd Management Area (HMA) is named after the Red Rocks Lakes that, when combined, cover about 75 acres. According to Litchfield manager Satica, they are the area’s main water source.

Alan Uchida, a rangeland management specialist with the Alturas, Calif., BLM office, said the lakes, although shallow, typically hold water for a few months after a wet spring, but the mild winter produced little snow and left fewer water reserves.

“The last time I visited the lakes, they were plumb dry,” Uchida said.

Uchida explained the Red Rocks HMA sits atop a ridge and is surrounded by private land on all sides. He said horses occasionally travel off the HMA in search of food or water, but he’s not surprised many are making regular visits to Porterfield’s property. Porterfield manages 2,000 head of cattle and has the most reliable water sources around, he said.

Fontana explained Red Rocks’ horses and livestock are sustained through summer months by 17 water holes, which are a mixture of natural water sources, like springs and the lakes, and manmade pits positioned to utilize natural runoff flows.

“But we haven’t had a drought like this in a long, long, time,” Satica said.

The drought, which encompasses most of the West, has left horse managers north of the California border, eying emergency plans as well. Jeff Clark, an Oregon BLM public information officer, said his agency hasn’t received any nuisance complaints about mustangs and private water sources yet, but it has plans in place if water becomes scarce for the state’s 4,200 wild horses: Some Eastern Oregon livestock grazers are working with the BLM to keep watering holes full even after their cattle have moved on, and last year in the Lakeview District, water trucks hauled hundreds of gallons of water to replenish wildlife watering holes.

“More than likely, that’s going to happen again,” Clark said.

All wildlife affected

In 1971, Congress passed the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act to protect, manage, and control wild horses and burros on public lands. The act is intended to allow the animals to roam within reasonable populations that are balanced with other species’ rangeland needs. Although the Red Rocks HMA has a management objective of 16 to 25 horses, officials initially estimated the herd could be as large as 80.

Since Porterfield’s complaint was approved in June, nearly 100 horses have been gathered from his ranch and officials believe there could be more on the HMA.

Rob Sharp, a wild horse management specialist in the Burns BLM office, said horses are no different than other livestock, and although they tend to travel quite a bit between water and forage sites, resources restrict how far they will go.

“When things get really poor, you’ll start to see horses congregate on whatever water source is left, along with other wildlife,” he said.

Fontana emphasized HMAs are not devoted exclusively to horses; domestic livestock, mule deer, pronghorn, upland birds and countless other species utilize the same water resources.

“If there’s no water for horses, there’s no water for wildlife,” Clark said.

Craig Foster, a district biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, said the water situation in the desert east of Lakeview isn’t dire yet, but some animals are moving to higher elevations, where springs may have received more precipitation.

“If the 95-degree-plus weather continues, water is going to be an issue later in the summer,” he said.

Foster added research has shown when water gets tight, wild horses will protect and defend a resource, preventing other animals, such as deer and pronghorn, from using it. He said if conditions remain dry, it’s likely conflicts between the horses and wildlife will arise.

“It’s going to be a concern, especially in the Beatys Butte area,” he said, noting the Lakeview District’s horse population also is well over its management objective.

ljarrell@heraldandnews.com; @LMJatHandN


THE REST OF THE STORY

 

This little HMA (Red Rock) is north east of Weed and almost on the Oregon/CA border with a VERY small AML of 25 horses.

Just so you know, the guy Porterfield who is quoted in the below article, and who made the official complaints for wild horse removal has 1041 active AUMs on the HMA equal to about forage enough for 87 wild horses full time if just he didn’t run his cattle there.  In addition, I estimated the total AUMs (Porterfield and a few others) at 1795 AUMs which would be equal to about 150 wild horses if they would all get their cattle OFF.

To take it a step further for the sake of argument, if the horses got their legal principal share using multiple use – that would still allow for 88 full time wild horses and an almost equal but slightly smaller number of livestock.

(*** Above numbers from RAS but they are rounded and the grazing allotments used for calculation appear to be almost equal although not exact to the size of the HMA.)

Also, Porterfield received $149,913 in federal farm subsidies (2002-2012) and two of the other ranchers with allotments on the HMA received a combined total of about $300,000 in farm subsidies.  If these so-called “ranchers” can’t successfully manage their livestock on their own land without this federal welfare money – then they do NOT belong in the ranching business.

Porterfield is right about one thing … this situation is totally unacceptable BUT it is his personal for-profit livestock on my land and on the land that belongs principally to the wild horses that is unacceptable!

It is much more about the water than even the land.

The Red Rocks seems to be a small HMA (a friend used to go there and said it was very remote and very few horses) and if the ranchers own the water rights and they turn off the springs after removing their livestock (and they DO that!!!) then there would be a water shortage for the wildlife and wild horses.  There is no doubt that many of the water catchments (manmade) are dry this year and we must realize that drought is “normal” …… heavy rain years and light rain years are NORMAL.  That in itself is not the problem.  If the water (springs and natural lakes) was not sucked dry by irrigation then there would not be this problem and if you look at Red Rocks HMA on google earth, it is surrounded by BIG irrigated private fields.

Attached google earth photo I did … HMA is in the middle and surrounded by irrigated corps.

Red Rock HMA

As for Porterfield … They are listed as producing CATTLE GENETICS AND INTERNATIONAL PRODUCER OF CATTLE!  i.e. they are insisting that our wild horses be removed in favor of GMO cattle and beef for export (see below).

As for their exact location, I am not sure but believe their main ranch is just east of Dorris and north of the HMA – so I would say 99% sure they are sucking up the water for irrigation for hay for their cattle.  It is also common for big ranches to own other bits of ranches that have sold out, so they could have numerous lands in the area and in this article about him when he was awarded cattleman of the year … it does state that they irrigate.

http://www.heraldandnews.com/article_9f3c8fcb-1214-547f-a3e5-0577c252b1af.html

 

more:

Porterfield Ranch

5524 Dorris Brownell Road
Dorris, CA 96023 – View Map

Phone: (530) 397-4726

Own This Business?

 

  •  

Porterfield Ranch

A privately held company in Dorris, CA. 

More Details for Porterfield Ranch

Categorized under Livestock Producers. Our records show it was established in 1965 and incorporated in California. Current estimates show this company has an annual revenue of 280000 and employs a staff of approximately 4.

Products or Services

Companies like Porterfield Ranch usually offer: Cattle Business, Cattle Genetics, Classes Of Cattle, International Cattle Producer, Moment Amongst Cattle Breeders.



17 replies »

  1. TAKE MY MONEY AND THEN COMPLAIN BECAUSE THE WILDLIFE IS DRINKIND AND EATING HAY THAT MY TAXES PAID FOR WHAT A UNFAIR WAY TO GO NEXT YOU WILL BE SAYING THE WILDLIFE IS SUCKING UP ALL THE WATER LETS REMOVE THEM TOO. THAT WATER IS BY RIGHTS NOT ALL YOURS FOR THE CATTLE .

    Like

  2. Very good, very good. The sleeping giant is waking. The real story behind the good old rancher trying to make do is revealed. Yes, we the txpayer have provided a sweet deal for those feral humans. Wonder how they vote on school lunch programs and mothers with dependent children programs. Hey, ask what they think about the unemployment insurance programs. You’ll hear them say, those people are bums – they are lazy – they need to get a job.

    It is time to get these cattle off public land. Now. FYI – Jeff Fontana (PR for BLM) did not respond to my email protesting the capture of these horses on this remote HMA. There was no notice, just went out and did it. I do fid it disgusting that these speciaists are so good at parroting each other.

    Like

  3. Federal subsidies to these kinds of ranchers needs to stop. It’s these kinds of ranchers/farmers that have put many small family farms out of business because they can’t compete with the government subsidized welfare ranchers/farmers. In other parts of the country individuals raise only as many animals as their own land will support. Perhaps these welfare ranchers need to “buy” crop/livestock insurance instead of relying on the government to keep them wealthy. Keep the cattle off of public lands and let mother nature take care of the wildlife (which includes wild horses and burros; not sure why they are separated out from the rest). If the cattle weren’t using up all of the water there would probably be enough to sustain the wildlife in those areas.

    Like

  4. Those round circles, those big green round circles – are hay, usually alfalfa which needs water down to 7 feet. Who is that hay being sold to, as it is clear the water is drawn off of the public land resources?

    Like

  5. It is this and other private for-profit ranchers that have BRAZENLY grazed the land belonging to the wild horses and depleted their water holes. Although more rain would be very welcome, the NOAA shows that only 20 miles from this Red Rock HMA area actually has 74% of their normal precipitation and last year had 103% of normal precipitation (Lava Beds NM). So the private ranches surrounding this Red Rocks HMA have spent years sucking the water table down with their irrigated pastures and destroying the wild horse habitat with their welfare grazing allotments and getting large federal cash subsidies plus ranchers are able to take out bank loans based on the “value” of their grazing permits and then to top it off, they get BIG money from their sale of hay and cattle overseas … and again … the wild horses that are legally protected get sent into the BLM pipeline where most disappear.

    If you haven’t read this … please do:
    “Welfare Ranching: The Subsidized Destruction of the American West”
    http://www.publiclandsranching.org/book.htm

    Like

  6. good luck getting these people to respond . i just now sent ms. eddie bernise johnson another letter and i will get another form letter instead of a real responds that could open a real dialogue and @ sue this a… raises the cows for export not for our use. not one of these jerk-offs in texas knows how to put their name on a bill. i wonder can governor perry close the border on exports of live animals . oh. i suppose not since he can’t even close the door on the ones coming in . wow ,who do we go, too . the greed and fghting against it .

    Like

  7. These Wild Horses need to be RETURNED to their Legal Herd Management Area.

    PUBLIC LAND LAW REVIEW
    http://scholarship.law.umt.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1074&context=plrlr
    An analysis of the Wild Horses Act and the relevant case law will demonstrate that the prevailing method used to eliminate the “straying problem”-extensive governmental removal of horses from public and private lands-COUNTERMANDS the protective purposes of the Act and of related public lands statutes.
    While the constitutional basis for § 1334′s regulation of conduct on private lands remains an open issue, several persuasive theories suggest that Congress was EMPOWERED TO EXTEND FEDERAL CONTROL BEYOND PUBLIC BOUNDRIES.
    Section 1334 of the Wild Horses Act provides landowners an
    inexpensive and convenient method of removing straying horses from their
    private property.
    The BLM is under a “MINISTERIAL DUTY” TO RETURN THE HORSES TO THE PUBLIC RANGE.

    Like

  8. The acting field manager for NE California’s BLM Alturas and Surprise field offices is Heather Whitman, the person who admitted authorizing this unjust removal.

    hwitman@blm.gov
    Surprise Field Office
    Main Contact Number: 530-279-6101
    And
    Alturas Field Office
    Main Contact Number: 530-233-4666

    Like

  9. If you take the requirement that best science must be used, Article 8 (h) that falsely characterizes our wild horses as alien, invasives also makes an exception for genetically modified organisms claiming on no basis whatsoever that the harm would be equivalent to the of a non-native species. This in government documents written by those who made this myth up. The problem is the Homer of Al Gore’s biological diversity narrative is ensconced in the NAS to continuing covering up the non-existant science used to create Al Gore’s big property seizure plan.

    Like

  10. This situation is so wrong! The ranchers and the BLM officials are crucifying the wild horses here and contrary to the law. Such hypocrisy in what they say to justify what they are doing! Excellent report, by the way!

    Like

Care to make a comment?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.