A Mustang murder mystery in northern Nevada

Tuesday's Horse

WILD HORSES NEVADA (Warning: Graphic Image) — On May 10, 2017, Tuesday’s Horse received an email from the Professor and Chair of the Geological and Environmental Sciences Department of a California University stating he was leading a student field trip in Northumberland Canyon south of Austin, Nevada the previous weekend and they discovered the following:

We came across six horse carcasses, all missing their heads. This was very disturbing to the students and I am trying to figure out what happened. Was there planned culling of wild horses? Why would the heads be removed?

The Professor had not been able to reach the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) so reached out to us for assistance.

At long last I tracked down the right BLM office thanks to the coordinates the Professor provided.

After several email exchanges and a few phone calls with a BLM agent in that office, we made little…

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19 comments on “A Mustang murder mystery in northern Nevada

  1. Public record re shooting of six wild burros near Austin, Lander, Nevada:
    Case 3:13-cr-00069-LRH-WGC Document 16 Filed 10/01/13 (excerpt)
    “D. The defendant admits and declares under penalty of perjury that the facts set forth below are true and correct:
    On or about November 4, 2012, within the District of Nevada, in the county of Lander, defendant DANIEL YOUNG did maliciously cause the death of a wild free-roaming burro by maliciously shooting and causing the death of Burro No. 1, a wild free-roaming burro, in violation of Title 16, United States code, Section 1338(a)(3). Defendant also admits as relevant conduct that on or about November 4, 2012, within the District of Nevada, in the County of Lander, he also maliciously shot and caused deaths of Burros No.2 through No. 6, all wild free-roaming burros.”

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  2. Interestingly enough, a couple of Mustangs were shot in Heber a few weeks ago. And this isn’t the first time there have been different wild horse and burro shootings happening within a small time frame which leads me to believe that there might be a correlation between these incidents. Think about it. Terrorists have communicated over private chat rooms and video game devices to plan out assassinations. Who’s to say that these horse murderers aren’t doing the same thing?

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  3. Oh my God. How horrible. This is outrageous. This must be investigated to the full degree. Let’s find the KILLERS PLEASE. BLM PLEASE GET WITH THE PROGRAM ON THIS ONE. I HATE HEARING THIS NEWS. LET’S FIND THE KILLERS AND HOLD THEM ACCOUNTABLE.

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  4. Possibly those skulls are being cleaned and sold for commercial gain — so everyone should pay attention to any horse skulls being painted and sold etc. at craft fairs, and ask for proof of origin. I know I have seen them but never considered they might have come from wild horses.

    Since we have stringent federal laws about possession feathers and various other wildlife parts, it may be time to demand proof of origin stamps on any horse bones (or other parts, really).

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  5. I searched online to try to find more information on this, and I discovered the following old story. I don’t know if it is news to anyone, but it was sure shocking to me. This kind of thing has been going on for decades. This is particularly shocking. Nevada sounds like a real hellhole for wild horses; and ranchers apparantly going on the rampage every so often. Add it to ‘the dossier’:

    http://articles.latimes.com/1998/dec/30/news/mn-59010

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  6. I try to Not Get angry however, the lack of Service the Forrest Service provides is showing. They could track the weapon used. Weapons can be registered or unregistered or used in other crimes or they r covering up for who they know did it. God’s ole boys club ya know, the club where ONLY certain folks had certain rights to commit any crime without the time. Well. The Forrest Service reminds more of the Dukes of Hazard if Enos had to investigate alone…….someone else better vet involved and solve this before something else bad happens in that county….

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  7. Was it where the collars would be setting???? Did you see the movie the “Counselor”?? The COLLAR device put on PPL was to behead them & that’s what I Thought was THE REASON behind the collars for horses as soon as I seen them &the FIRST thing I SAID was NOW are we gona find them dead missing their heads in the wilderness!!!! And they now ARE!!

    I’ve seen two DIFFERENT collars…one was metal & definitely cuda had that capability… THEY ARENT TRYIN TO SAVE ANY HORSES!!! This IS MURDER dun by our GOV… They R OUR NEW TERRORISTS KILLING OUR HORSES& KILLING our LAND to make it look JUST like Yemen & Syria& Iran&….. & THEY R GETTING AWAY W/ IT ….Thez R 🚩NEW WORLD ORDER “PPL”.. KILLING OUR COUNTRY& WILDLIFE & PUTTING a black snake thru our COUNTRY to KILL our LAND& ALL 🐎🐴🐻🐑🐇🐐👦👧who need CLEAN WATER to live..
    Ive researched these pro ppl since 09″ & THEY R RUINING EVERYTHING FROM BEHIND THE SHADOWS….CALLING ALL THEZ SHOTS & MORE DEVASTATION TO FOLLOW!!!! They are letting Us all be ASSAULTED..HORSES CAME 1st..But won’t be LAST ones affected…this must be addressed & STOPPED ASAP…& get the collars off the horses…good luck ever getting close to them again…or was THAT THE PLAN RELEASE W/ the contraption on them so u won’t be blamed….SERIOUSLY DELUSIONAL PEOPLE ARE IN CHARGE OR DOING THIS!!! Its NOT to be TOLERATED!!!!

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    • What a terrible attitude. Do some ranchers think they can completely sanitize the landscape for their own purposes? This man refused to cooperate with the agency – and was so brazen he didn’t even try to hide what he had done. From the comments I have read, hunters are very disappointed by this, to say the least. I’m no big fan of hunting, but surely it is better than wasting these magnificent animals. Ranchers don’t want wolves around to help out either. 😦

      There was also an interesting story I read where a horse was killed by an elk, but it had been initially called a ‘probable’ wolf depredation until further investigation, also in Oregon I believe. When ranchers are behaving this way, it makes you wonder whether their claims of cattle losses are legitimate.

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      • Ida, this case is more complex, as it seems the Elk were transgressing on private land and the agencies involved offered no or only minimal assistance. Herds of Elk will homestead a good source of hay once they find it and can bankrupt anyone keeping stock for the winter — including private pleasure horses, as I’ve seen Elk wipe out even hay stored in sheds once they find a way in. So while they are doing what animals do, they are creating very selective and large financial hardships for some. Some states will pay for damages but evidently OR doesn’t, which led to these drastic measures.

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  8. Animals don’t recognize the human concept of private land. Still, these people can’t expect to wipe out all the elk, wolves, or to have taxes and funds endlessly foot the bills for their losses when they are choosing to buck nature. Maybe it isn’t the right place for their business. Like raising cattle in arid areas. Can’t be forced. Seems rather basic.

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    • There is no rationale at all, to me, for what this man has done. Noone owes him a successful livelihood, there is always risk involved. I hope he is prosecuted to the full extent of the law, which probably won’t be much anyway. If he totally lost control and went on a killing spree like this, I don’t see how anyone can be understanding about it. It there is so much hardship, perhaps he should sell out.

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  9. Too many sickos and drunkards with too many guns out there…

    And the killings will certainly continue, even if all in those little towns know perfectly who it was and why it was done.

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  10. And to say that he was offered little or no assistance from the government is untrue. He refused to accept any of the alternatives offered to him, and couldn’t be bothered to take care of the meat from the animals he killed, which I am sure there would have been quite a bit of interest in. He refused a general hunt on his property. They even offered him a kill permit, which he declined. In times of decreased funding, does he expect to be subsidized? As a commenter said, if he wants assistance from the government, he has to follow the government’s rules. If he want taxpayer money, he has to follow the government’s rules, and wildlife is part of the public trust. The only good thing to come of it is that the ‘wolves stealing all the elk and deer’ mantra is looking very false indeed.

    I’ll tell you, I have not regretted my decision to give up beef one bit, 20 years or so ago. I have totally lost the taste for it now, and you couldn’t pay me enough to eat it now, with all the misery that is associated with it. I hope beef eaters know or even care what it is their appetites contribute to.

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  11. Also, to say that the gentleman farmer received no or minimal assistance from the government isn’t true. He was offered several alternatives to deal with the problem – he refused all of them. Wouldn’t allow a general hunt on his property, was offered a kill permit that came with the stipulation that he dress the animals – which if it was such an imposition for him, I’m sure many would have been able to do it for him. Refused all of it – the only thing I’m not sure was offered was actual money. But in these times of budget cuts, is that reasonable? And should taxpayers foot the bill when elk are protected under the public trust? I’ll say it again – these people have no right to expect the landscape to be sterilized for their personal interests. As a commenter said, if this man wants government assistance, he has to play by the government’s rules.

    I’ll tell you, I have never regretted giving up beef.

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  12. My point here was for people to consider why wild horses, valued and owned by “we the people” can be shot without consequences or removed from private lands at public expense on request of private landowners (see Wyoming Checkerboard for decades of case history), and even when removals are later determined to be illegal, horses are not returned but remain captive, again at taxpayer expense.

    Contrast this with another wild animal valued and owned by “we the people”, namely Elk, and in the situation I linked a private landowner requested removals, was denied any realistic solutions, shot the animals and in in serious legal trouble as a result.

    In other words, why does citizen killing of protected wild horses never result in consequensces (see Salazar/Davis for an egregious example) but citizen killing of elk is considered a highly serious offense.

    In both cases the animals have no clue what rules or boundaries we humans make, but an enormous double standard is exposed by comparing them.

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