Erik Molvar, Exec. Dir. of Western Watersheds Project, on Wild Horse & Burro Radio

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Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_LogoJoin us for Wild Horse Wednesdays®, for a special show on Friday, Jan. 19, 2018

4:00 p.m. PST … 5:00 p.m. MST … 6:00 p.m. CST … 7:00 p.m. EST

Listen to the archived show (HERE!)

You can also listen to the show on your phone by calling (917) 388-4520.

This show will be archived so you can listen to it anytime.

Our guest is ERIK MOLVAR, Executive Director of Western Watersheds Project. Erik fought oil and gas projects in Wyoming during the Bush administration. He is a wildlife biologist with published research in the behavior, ecology, and population dynamics of Alaskan moose as well as large-scale conservation planning. Erik has been a conservation advocate, the Exec. Dir. of Wyoming-based Biodiversity Conservation Alliance, and led WildEarth Guardians’ Sagebrush Sea Campaign. Erik is a contributor to The Hill and his blog posts can be found here.

Western Watersheds Project (WWP) aims to protect and restore western watersheds and wildlife through education, public policy initiatives and legal advocacy. WWP works to influence and improve public lands management throughout the West, with a primary focus on the negative impacts of livestock grazing on 250 million acres of western public lands.

This show will be hosted by Debbie Coffey (V.P. and Dir. of Wild Horse Affairs) of Wild Horse Freedom Federation.

To contact us: ppj1@hush.com

TO LISTEN TO ALL ARCHIVED WILD HORSE & BURRO RADIO SHOWS, CLICK HERE.

To find out more about Wild Horse Freedom Federation and our work to keep wild horses and burros wild and free on our public lands visit www.WildHorseFreedomFederation.org

Donate Here: http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/donate/

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Feel Good Sunday: Mini and Pony Video Compilation

“Hold your horses, er, ponies; what else to bring a smile to your face but interesting video clips of the “lil” ones at play.  It’s a day of rest but why not expend a chuckle or two over these bodacious little guys having one heck of a good time.  Take a breather and relax a bit my fellow advocates.  You deserve the day off.  Keep the faith.” ~ R.T.


The Private Company Selling Off America’s Public Lands

story by Mya Frazier as published on OutsideOnline.com

EnergyNet, an online auction company from Amarillo, Texas, is set to make a fortune from oil and gas leases.  And good luck finding a way to protest.

When Texas oilman Bill Britain started the auction site EnergyNet in October 1999, it wasn’t exactly a state-of-the-art operation. Its homepage used a generic design template, an add-on to the Virtual Auctioneer software Britain bought from a Dallas firm. Like hordes of other entrepreneurs at the time, Britain hoped to bring the billion-dollar auctioneering model of eBay to an industry where he had a toehold. A decade and a half after graduating from West Point, Britain had started J-Brex Co., an Amarillo-based energy company, and had oil wells scattered all over Texas. If there was one thing he knew well, it was how to buy and sell drilling leases.

Britain boasted of “changing the way the oil and gas industry did business.” He pitched his auctions as “ON LINE REAL TIME,” but the technology was hardly game-changing—bidders were notified by email when they were outbid—and his timing, at the apex of the dot-com bubble, was terrible. “It burst almost the moment we got started,” Britain recently told Forbes.

Despite such inauspicious beginnings, by 2012 EnergyNet had become one of the industry’s biggest auction sites for oil and gas leases, even if overall sales on the platform were relatively modest. But over the next couple years, Britain began inking exclusive contracts to host lease auctions of public lands, including with state land agencies and, most notably, in 2015 with the Bureau of Land Management.

The platform took off. Less than a year into the Trump administration, transactions have risen to $1.25 billion. About half the transactions through the first three quarters of 2017, or about $600 million, were leases of public lands.

EnergyNet typically earns a 2 percent commission with state agencies; federal land commissions are set at 1.5 percent. By October of 2017, EnergyNet had earned an estimated $9 million auctioning off America’s public lands, based on an Outside analysis. Once fourth-quarter transactions are finalized, earnings could potentially rise to $15 million or more. (EnergyNet, a private company, doesn’t disclose profits.)

Donald Trump campaigned on the promise to unleash America’s estimated $50 trillion in untapped shale, oil, and natural gas reserves—a vision now being executed by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Once-protected national monuments, like Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante, are now vulnerable to drilling. And Britain’s once-obscure auction site provides the platform through which this massive opening of federal lands for energy extraction will happen—all without the pesky problem of public protests.

So how did a private company become the biggest seller of America’s public lands?…(CONTINUED)

https://www.outsideonline.com/2269336/obscure-texas-company-selling-public-land

The BLM: Who’s running the show?

Since the BLM has removed state websites and staff directories from the internet, and they now have only one portal for very limited information for the public, we thought we’d give you a quick update on who’s running the Bureau of Land Management at national and state levels.  Source:  BLM

Brian Steed   Brian Steed

Deputy Director, Programs and Policy, Bureau of Land Management

Exercising Authority of the Director

Brian Steed is the BLM’s Deputy Director for Programs and Policy, exercising authority of the director. Before joining the BLM in October 2017, Steed served as Chief of Staff for Representative Chris Stewart of Utah. Before that, he taught economics at Utah State University and was once a deputy county attorney in Iron County, Utah. Read the full biography

Michael Nedd   Michael D. Nedd

Acting Deputy Director, Operations

Michael D. (Mike) Nedd is the Acting Deputy Director of  Operations.  Prior to this appointment he served as Assistant Director for the BLM’s Energy, Minerals & Realty Management Directorate. In this capacity he provided vision and leadership for developing and implementing programmatic policies, guidance, oversight, and human and fiscal resources for the BLM’s renewable energy, fluid and solid minerals, lands and realty, and cadastral survey programs. Read the full biography

Official photo of BLM Alaska Acting State Director Karen Mouritsen   Karen Mouritsen

BLM Alaska Acting State Director

Karen Mouritsen was an attorney practicing law for DOI, but she was motivated to make a career change to the BLM after serving on detail as an Associate District Manager and learning how challenging and rewarding it is to work together as a team with many talented BLM employees.  Read the full biography

Photo of BLM Arizona State Director Raymond Suazo   Raymond Suazo

BLM Arizona State Director

Ray Suazo is the BLM Arizona State Director, responsible for leading a staff of nearly 500 employees and the management of more than 12 million surface and 17 million subsurface acres of public lands in Arizona. Ray joined the BLM Arizona State Office in 2006. He served as Chief Information Officer, Deputy State Director for Business and Support Services, and Associate State Director before his appointment as the Arizona State Director in 2011.   Read the full biography

BLM California State Directory Jerry Perez   Jerome E. Perez

BLM California State Director

Jerome E. Perez is the California State Director for the Bureau of Land Management. He previously served as the State Director for BLM Oregon/Washington and as the Deputy Regional Forester of the U.S. Forest Service’s Intermountain Region. Read the full biography

Shoop_Acting CO SD   Greg Shoop

Acting BLM Colorado State Director

Greg Shoop has worked for the BLM on and off since 1977. He has been BLM Colorado’s Associate State Director since 2014 and is currently serving as its Acting State Director. Read the full biography.

Acting State Director Mitch Leverette   Mitch Leverette

BLM Eastern States Acting State Director

Mitch Leverette started his BLM career 30 years ago as a staff geologist in the BLM California State Office.  He worked in the California State Office for over 17 years working across several mineral programs and positions.  Mitch started working in the Washington Headquarters in 2004 as Deputy Division Chief for Solid Minerals and was promoted to Division Chief in 2008.  Read the full biography

Acting BLM Idaho State Director Peter Ditton  Peter Ditton

Acting BLM Idaho State Director

Ditton attended Montana College of Mineral Science and Technology where he graduated with a degree in geological engineering.  He began a career with the BLM in the cooperative education program out of Great Falls, Montana working as a petroleum engineer.  He has worked in DC and a number of states including Alaska, California, Idaho and Arizona.  Ditton has also held a number of detail and full-time positions including: petroleum engineer, planning coordinator, field and district manager, Associate State Director for Alaska and Idaho, California State Director. Read the full biography

Jon Raby, BLM Montana-Dakotas   Jon Raby

BLM Montana-Dakotas Acting State Director

In Montana-Dakotas, Raby will oversee more than 8 million acres of public land and over 47 million acres of federal mineral estate in Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota.  HIs career includes over 20 years with the BLM in Oregon, Montana and Washington D.C. In addition to the BLM, Jon has also worked for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Forest Service.  He has also been the BLM Liaison to the Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, and the Chief of Staff in the BLM Director’s Office in Washington, D.C.   Read the full biography

BLM Nevada State Director John Ruhs, Reno, Nevada, BLM photo   John Ruhs

Nevada State Director

John Ruhs has served as the Ely District Manager and Winnemucca District Fire Management Officer. In addition to his work in Nevada, John has also served as BLM’s Senior Special Assistant in Washington, D.C., and District Manager of the High Desert District in Wyoming. He has also worked for the BLM in Colorado, Idaho, and Oregon. Read the full biography

Aden Seidlitz   Aden Seidlitz

Acting BLM New Mexico State Director

Aden Seidlitz began his BLM career in 1983 as a Petroleum Engineer in Wyoming, a Petroleum Engineer/Program Leader at the Alaska State Office, and a Supervisory Petroleum Engineer in Montana.  He became an Acting Area Manager, then Associate Field Manager and then an Acting Field Manager in Montana.  He worked as a Field Manager in Utah and became BLM’s Chief for the Fire Planning and Fuels Management Division in Boise, Idaho, and then became the BLM Boise District Manager.  Aden was selected as the New Mexico Associate State Director on 2012, and is now Acting State Director.  Read the full biography.

Jamie Connell, BLM Oregon-Washington State Director   Jamie Connell

BLM Oregon-Washington State Director

Connell received her B.S. in Petroleum Engineering from Montana Tech in 1985, and began her BLM career as a petroleum engineer in Miles City, Montana. Connell’s managerial experience includes stints for the BLM and the U.S. Forest Service in locations across the West, including Great Falls and Malta, Montana; Boise, Idaho; and the cities of Montrose, Silverthorne, Glenwood Springs, and Grand Junction, all in Colorado. Connell most recently served as the State Director for BLM-Montana/Dakotas.  Read the full biography

BLM Utah State Director Ed Roberson. BLM photo   Ed Roberson

BLM Utah State Director

As BLM Utah State Director, Ed Roberson, who has had a 37-year career with the BLM.  He was most recently Director of the BLM National Operations Center in Denver. Roberson also served in top BLM roles in New Mexico, and held senior level positions in Washington, D.C., including a seven year tenure as the BLM Assistant Director for Renewable Resources and Planning.  Read the full biography

Official photo of Wyoming State Director Mary Jo Rugwell.   Mary Jo Rugwell

BLM Wyoming State Director

Mary Jo Rugwell was selected as the state director for the Bureau of Land Management in Wyoming. She had been acting state director for about a year and a half prior to being chosen. Mary Jo served as the Associate State Director in Wyoming for over two years. She  is a native of Cheyenne, WY.  Read the full biography

 

Feel Good Sunday: The Inexplicably Strange History Of Mr. Ed The Horse

story by as published on Ranker.com under Unbelievable Animals

“Today we escape into our past and date ourselves by remembering a well known animal actor that we all loved and adored…Mr. Ed was my first exposure to horses, even though he was only 2 dimensional.  But none the less; today I see a lot of  “Talking Horses” when I casually stroll through our pastures and love to hear what each and every one of them have to say. (the secret is to listen)  May their love speak to our hearts and uplift our spirits.” ~ R.T.


In the 1960s, the story of a man and his talking horse captivated the globe. The show was Mister Ed, and it followed the hijinks of a talking horse named Mr. Ed and his keeper Wilbur Post. The show became an instant classic, and the character of Ed has popped up everywhere from rap music and comedy sketches to children’s shows.

Behind the character of Mr. Ed was a real horse. His name was Bamboo Harvester and he was already famous when he stepped onto the Hollywood scene. TV’s most famous horse was born and bred a star. Lighthearted and humorous at times, stubborn and imperious on occasion, the real Mr. Ed was a true trail blazer.

Like most celebrities, his death was untimely and shrouded in mystery. And in the wake of his passing we learned that while he could indeed be imitated, he was one of the greatest horse stars of all time.

This epic equestrian celebrity’s story began in sunny California. He was born in 1949 to two purebred horses, and was eventually owned by Lester “Les” Hilton. His family came from a long line of purebred horses meant for show, and his father Harvester was one of the prized horses of the San Fernando Valley.

Bamboo Harvester was a beautiful and energetic horse that caught the eye of many. He also won awards and accolades as a show horse. While his most notable footprint – or should we say hoof print – in Hollywood was his performance as Mr. Ed, his California neighbors remember fondly for both his spirit and his spunk.

The pilot episode of Mister Ed featured a different horse entirely.  In fact, the pilot was recorded with an entirely different cast altogether. This episode, titled “The Wonderful World of Wilbur Pope” never saw any screen time. If it had, this legendary series would have played out to a totally different tune.

After the Chestnut gelding initially cast as Mr. Ed had a bit of a breakdown, Bamboo Harvester stepped in for the second pilot, which featured the rest of the classic cast and became the first official episode to air on national television. It’s hard not to help but wonder if his life would have been different (and maybe longer) had he not been bestowed with that lead part.

Even though in real life Mr. Ed was a non-talking horse, he had a lot to say. Having grown up in the limelight, his attitude matched that of his human counterparts. Subsequently, he was a bit of a diva. Bamboo Harvester was known to call it quits in the middle of a scene. He decided when the shoot was over by simply storming off stage and refusing to return. He also had celebrity demands. They weren’t quite as specific as bowls full of only blue M&M’s, or an entirely vegan dressing room, although the latter would have been appropriate in this case. So what did he demand? Sweet tea by the gallon and 20 pounds of hay every day…(CONTINUED)

Dynamics of Wildlife Conservation between Oppositions & Donations to Nonprofit Organizations

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke received thousands of dollars in campaign contributions from Safari Club International while running for Congress, spoke at the hunting advocacy group’s 2016 veterans breakfast, had a notable photo-op with its director of litigation on his first day as head of the Interior Department, and dined with its vice president in Alaska in 2017.  –  Debbie

(Photo:  Reuters from NY Post.com)

SOURCE:  PPJ Gazette

by Sam Jojola

Safari Club International (SCI) the NRA and other alliances

These are very strong alliances that have had considerable historical and present influence over Congress regarding their unified agendas.  Other lesser known organizations that support hunting and trophy hunting with SCI and the NRA are the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Wild Sheep Foundation.

These groups are completely unified in their focus and cause.  Other opposition animal and wildlife conservation organizations could be more formidable and much more influential if they worked more closely together as a coalition if they followed the template that works for SCI, the NRA and other related entities.

It is an example of the “United we stand, divided we fall” philosophy that makes them so successful in their endeavors whether you support or don’t support these agendas.

Conservation NGOs should focus on coalition concept on key wildlife issues

It is often mentioned in articles over the years that SCI and the NRA are a very small special interest group and how can they be so successful in pushing through their unified agenda in support of trophy hunting across the globe.  It appears they often advance ahead of those conservation groups that collectively have greater numbers.

Opposing conservation organizations could really learn from that concept to pursue long term protections for animals and wildlife across the globe. Some are working together on certain wildlife issues, but more need to unify collectively to make a difference if imperiled wildlife resources are going to have future protection, particularly in the legal arena.  Read More

Mexico’s Standing Rock? Sempra, TransCanada Face Indigenous Pipeline Resistance South of Border

“While best known for the Canada-to-U.S. Keystone XL pipeline and the years-long fight to build that proposed tar sands line, the Alberta-based TransCanada has also faced permitting issues in Mexico for its proposed U.S.-to-Mexico gas pipelines.”

SOURCE: DESMOG blog

by Steve Horn

Since Mexico privatized its oil and gas resources in 2013, border-crossing pipelines including those owned by Sempra Energy and TransCanada have come under intense scrutiny and legal challenges, particularly from Indigenous peoples.

Opening up the spigot for U.S. companies to sell oil and gas into Mexico was a top priority for the Obama State Department under Hillary Clinton.

Mexico is now facing its own Standing Rock-like moment as the Yaqui Tribe challenges Sempra Energy’s Agua Prieta pipeline between Arizona and the Mexican state of Senora. The Yaquis in the village of Loma de Bacum claim that the Mexican government has failed to consult with them adequately, as required by Mexican law.

Indigenous Consultations

Under Mexico’s new legal approach to energy, pipeline project permits require consultations with Indigenous peoples living along pipeline routes. (In addition, Mexico supported the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which includes the principle of “free, prior and informed consent” from Indigenous peoples on projects affecting them — something Canada currently is grappling with as well.)

It was a similar lack of indigenous consultation which the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe said was the impetus for lawsuits and the months-long uprising against the Dakota Access pipeline near the tribe’s reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, in late 2016. Now, according to Bloomberg and Mexican reporter Gema Villela Valenzuela for the Spanish language publication Cimacnoticias, history is repeating itself in the village of Loma de Bacum in northwest Mexico.

Agua Prieta, slated to cross the Yaqui River, was given the OK by seven of eight Yaqui tribal communities. But the Yaquis based in Loma de Bacum have come out against the pipeline passing through their land, even going as far as chopping out a 25 foot section of pipe built across it.

“The Yaquis of Loma de Bacum say they were asked by community authorities in 2015 if they wanted a 9-mile tract of the pipeline running through their farmland — and said no. Construction went ahead anyway,” Bloomberg reported in a December 2017 story. “The project is now in a legal limbo. Ienova, the Sempra unit that operates the pipeline, is awaiting a judicial ruling that could allow them to go in and repair it — or require a costlier re-route.”

As the legal case plays out in the Supreme Court of Justice in Mexico, disagreements over the pipeline and its construction in Loma de Bacum have torn the community apart and even led to violence, according to Cimacnoticias.

Construction of the pipeline “has generated violence ranging from clashes between the community members themselves, to threats to Yaqui leaders and women of the same ethnic group, defenders of the Human Rights of indigenous peoples and of the land,” reported Cimacnoticias, according to a Spanish-to-English translation of its October 2016 story.

“They explained that there have been car fires and fights that have ended in homicide. Some women in the community have had to stay in places they consider safe, on the recommendation of the Yaquis authorities of the town of Bácum, because they have received threats after opposing signing the collective permit for the construction of the pipeline.”

Read more here

 

10 Wins for Animals in 2017 That Prove YOU Are Making a Difference!

by as published on OneGreenPlanet.org

“Equines not mentioned, here, but you all have kept horse slaughterhouses from reopening in 2017 and have been the voice for the wild ones…so keep up the great works…there is still a lot of work to do.” ~ R.T.


When we sign on social media and are inundated with dozens of news stories of awful things happening to animals, from fur farms to factory farms, it’s easy to feel disheartened. Sometimes it feels like change for animals is happening at a snail’s pace. But we’re here to tell you that there have been plenty of victories for animals over the years from grand national changes to smaller yet still powerful animal rescue success stories.

Don’t believe us? Let’s take a look at just ten victories from this year!

1. Ringling Bros. and Barnum Bailey Circus Shuts Down

Flickr

Animal lovers worldwide started off 2017 with a huge victory: Ringling Bros. and Barnum Bailey Circus announced they were SHUTTING DOWN. All of the phone calls, protests outside of venues, emails sent, letters to the editor, talking to friends and family… all of your efforts worked! Ringling Bros. shutting down is the perfect example of what happens when animal advocates come together and make positive change.

The fall of Ringling Bros. sent a domino effect in the industry with New York City banning the use of animals in circuses this summer. The message is clear: people no longer want to see animals held captive to perform silly tricks.

2. Taiwan Becomes First Asian Country to Ban Eating Dog and Cat Meat

Flickr

That’s right, Taiwan BANNED the consumption of eating dog and cat meat earlier this year! Where previously the Animal Protection Act, Taiwan’s animal rights legislation, only covered the slaughter and sale of dog and cat meat, the new amendment specifically prohibits the consumption of dog and cat meat as well. Now individuals who eat or trade dog or cat meat can now be fined between $1,640 to $8,200.

With an estimated 30 million dogs killed annually in Asia for the dog meat trade, Taiwan joins Hong Kong, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand in trying to put an end to the horrific trade. That’s huge!

3. Vancouver Banned the Sale of Puppy Mill Dogs and Cats in Pet Stores

Flickr

Many U.S. cities, including San Francisco, Chicago, and Phoenix, have already instated laws banning the sale of animals in pet shops, instead of requiring pet shops to partner with animal rescues and shelters to promote the adoption of animals. Vancouver banned the sale of puppy mill dogs and cats in pet stores this summer and just recently, Victoria became the first Australian state to ban puppy farming!

According to City Councilmember Heather Deal, over 1,200 concerned citizens sent e-mails voicing their support of banning the sale of animals in pet shops, proving that public opinion truly has the power to create change.

4. Animal Abuse Is Illegal in Lebanon

Flickr

In August of this year, the President of Lebanon, Michael Auon, officially signed an animal welfare and protection law, making animal abuse illegal in the country. Now, Lebanon has a strong and comprehensive law to give animals the legal protection they need and to punish those who abuse them.

Among a long list, the law has general requirements for the handling and keeping of all animals, actual rules for zoospet shops, farms, and slaughterhouses, and stricter punishments for criminals with fines up to 100 million Lira and up to four years in prison. So long, animal abusers!

5. Authorities Deny License Renewal for Horrific Zoo

Flickr

The South Lakes Safari Zoo in Dalton, Cumbria has long been under fire for its astonishing neglect, abuse, and murder of innocent animalsCaptive Animals’ Protection Society (CAPS) has been a voice for the animals, diligently investigating the zoo. Reports detailing the events that occurred within its confines are some of the most gruesome and devastating we have ever heard. Perhaps the most well-known of these tragedies is the death of zookeeper Sarah McClay, who was mauled to death by a tiger. Despite her family’s requests to not kill the tiger, the animal was euthanized with no documented reason why.

After CAPS’s investigations and persistent outcries from concerned animal lovers, this terrible facility has had its renewal license denied. The council describes the zoo’s owner, David Gill, as “not a fit and suitable person” to manage the facilities and properly care for the animals. Well done, animal lovers!

6. Guggenheim Removes Cruel Exhibit Featuring Dogs Trying to Fight Each Other

Flickr

The Guggenheim Museum in New York City removed three pieces featuring animals from an upcoming exhibit called “Art and China after 1989” by couple Peng Yu and Sun Yuan. All three of the pieces involved animals, including one that outraged animal lovers everywhere. In a seven-minute video called, “Dogs That Cannnot Touch Each Other,” eight American Pit Bulls are seen trying to attack each other while on a non-motorized treadmill.

Animal lovers protested outside of the Guggenheim and an online petition that asked for cruelty-free exhibits received over half a million signatures. The museum said they were removing the pieces “out of concern for the safety of its staff, visitors and participating artists.” Fearing continual public outrage, the Guggenheim finally pulled the exhibit!

7. Vietnam Agrees to Close All Bear Bile Farms

Flickr

Animal lovers worldwide have worked tirelessly for years to end the horrific practice of bear bile farming and it worked. It was announced in July of this year that the Vietnamese government has agreed to a plan with Animals Asia, a rescue group at the forefront of ending the bear bile industry, to end bear bile farming in the country!

Even though bear bile farming has been illegal in Vietnam since 1992 with the country lacking resources to build sanctuaries, households were allowed to keep the bears on the government’s behalf. The MOU states that the government will ensure no bears are kept in private households where illegal bile extraction can take place and the 1,000 bears currently held captive in Vietnam will be moved to sanctuaries.

8. All Slaughterhouses in England Are Getting Cameras 

Pixabay

England took a big step in stopping animal cruelty by mandating that all slaughterhouses be outfitted with closed circuit TV (surveillance systems, cameras, and other recorders meant to monitor an organization or business).

According to a report in the Guardian, the first animals in the industry to receive this surveillance will be chickens bred for meat, followed by egg-laying hens. More animals will be included as they progress. England is proving that it is indeed possible to hold the animal agriculture industry accountable!

9. More Areas Are Banning Declawing Cats

Pixabay

Nova Scotia became the first Candian province to ban the declawing of cats and Denver, Colorado became the first city out of California to pass a law to ban the declawing of cats!

As awareness regarding the dangers of declawing has spread, the practice has become more of a thing of a past as an increasing number of veterinarians refuse to declaw cats. Twenty-one countries and several U.S. municipalities have banned the cruel practice that is likened to amputating a human’s fingertips. Let’s keep the momentum going!

10. More and More Brands Are Going Fur-Free

Pixabay

Just this year, clothing company, Burlington, as well as Michael Kors, Jimmy Cho and Gucci have all gone FUR FREE in a testament to society’s evolving standards.

Animals on fur farms suffer unimaginable cruelty from electrocution to even being skinned alive. Each year one billion innocent animals endure miserable lives of being confined in tiny, unsanitary cages only to brutally tortured and killed. Some of the animals destined for fur coats, boot linings, and other fashion accessories include raccoon dogs, rabbits, foxes, mink, chinchillas, dogs, cats and more.

But thanks to compassionate consumers, fur farms will soon be a thing of the past! To learn more about some other awesome cruelty-free fashion brands, check this out.

You Make a Difference

Because of YOU, these amazing victories (and many more!) were made possible, all in under one year. Feeling inspired? Head over to One Green Planet’s petition page to take action on other important animal welfare issues. Let’s keep up the good fight and help score some more victories for animals!

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/wins-for-animals-that-prove-you-are-making-a-difference/

Feel Good Sunday Video: Horse Dancing the Old Year Out and the New Year In

“Today we put ‘Stupid’ and ‘Lunacy’ on the back burner while we celebrate the upcoming New Year.  Our FGS installation is just such a celebration, a N.O. Police horse dancing in the street, loving life and enjoying the moment.

Dance with your ponies today, even if it is only a mental picture, dance with their spirit and set yours free.

With all of us working together, 2018 will be like no other.  The horses and donkeys will finally catch their break.

Happy New Year my friends, and the very best of wishes to you and yours.  Be safe.” ~ R.T.


Video: The True Spirit of Christmas Knows No Walls

“Over the years I have attempted not to broadcast when and where I was as I worked a career which centered on international travel.  Our book was born while I worked in Cabinda, Angola and even the book contains a story, a true one, written while I was in Nigeria.  Two years ago, this Christmas, I was in a rural mountain town in Sichuan Province, China called Nanba. 

It is somewhat heart-tugging being away for the holidays but over the years I gradually learned to make the best of where I was.  In 2015 my buddy, a few of my Chinese friends and a lone Phillappino with a saxophone launched a plan to mezmorize the children of the town.  Santa (me) would walk among the streets of Nanba on Christmas and pass out reflective bracelets, for safety, and little hair do-dads to the town’s children.  Most of the children had never seen a tall white haired and bearded westerner before let alone Santa Clause, so we set forth to walk among them as the slideshow documents.

Now before you say what does this have to do with equines I would like to point out the Terry and I have never had two legged children but have always had a house/ranch/farm full of the four legged type.  So certain nuances and perks of having mini-duplicates of ourselves have escaped us but two years ago today, I had the eye opening experience of looking into the eyes of these beautiful children and seeing the same innocence and curiosity that I view mirrored back to me in the eyes of our equine charges.  It has forever moved me and two years later still warms my soul and gives me hope that human, perhaps, are born with innocent dignity and a positive, loving spirit.  Perhaps if we can learn how to prevent the world from strangling and corrupting all that is good in us, we may have a chance to survive and, likewise, our fellow passengers on this Space Ship Earth.

Capture the purity of this day and keep the faith, my friends, I believe that out there, somewhere, there is goodness…this video points to that very hope.

Merry Christmas.” ~ R.T.