Nevada Passes Law to Restrict Wildlife Trade

By: Mark Hofberg as published on the International Fund for Animal Welfare

“It is unfortunate that similar protection has not been granted to Nevada’s Wild Horses and Burros.” ~ R.T.


Nevada joins California, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington, New York, and New Jersey as states that have stood up for wildlife within their borders.

Another state has taken decisive action to stop wildlife trafficking.

On Monday, Governor Sandoval of Nevada signed SB 194 into law, making the Silver State the 7th state to restrict the trade of products such as ivory and rhino horn within the state to help save wildlife species.

photo by R.T. Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Wildlife poaching and trafficking is one of the principal threats to wildlife around the world, and the US is one of the world’s leading destinations for wildlife products to be traded and sold. Our demand for these products is contributing to precipitous drops in populations of threatened animals like elephants, rhinos, and pangolins.

By passing this legislation, Nevada is drawing a line in the sand, saying that they will not be a part of the decline of these amazing species by letting illegally sourced products made from them be bought and sold in the state.

SB 194 protects a suite of imperiled species in addition to elephants and rhinos, including African lions, tigers, pangolins, sea turtles, and others.

Nevada joins California, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington, New York, and New Jersey as states that have stood up for wildlife within their borders. SB 194 also brings Nevada closer in line with federal regulations passed last year that restrict ivory trade across state borders and into and out of the country.

These seven states are doing their part to relieve pressure on wildlife species that are being decimated by poaching and trafficking and ensure that elephants, rhinos, lions and other iconic species are here to stay.

Congratulations to the Nevada citizens and the coalition of wildlife conservation groups, spearheaded by the Humane Society of the United States and Dazzle Africa, who were instrumental in educating lawmakers about the problem and the need for SB 194. Many IFAW supporters in Nevada also offered their voices, contacting Governor Sandoval and asking him to sign the bill last week.

To ALL Mothers Great or Small: We Love and Honor You This Day!

“It is my most sincere hope that no Mother visits this blog, today, but instead is with her family celebrating this day of life and hope.  But should some stray, animal loving mom stray a bit and visit us we would like to dedicate the blog to you and all mothers regardless off number of legs, wings or fins.

Today is yours, we love you all!!!” ~ R.T.


14 Quotes Every Animal Advocate Should Know By Heart

Source: One Green Planet

Fighting for animal protection of any kind is often a difficult and seemingly never-ending up high battle. News headlines can reek of despair and fresh petitions crop up daily urging us to end every sort of cruelty imaginable (and in some cases, simply beyond belief).

Truly, issues abound at every corner – from farmed animal abuses to endangered species conservation – and they just always seem to keep on coming.

Yet, victories are possible and many occur each and every year thanks to hardworking nonprofits, grassroots groups, and active citizens.

We have helped a lot of animals even just within the past decade, but as always, there is a long way to go.

To inspire us to keep moving forward, check out the following 14 quotes — all serve to remind us of exactly who we’re fighting for and why, which is something we must never forget. Committing these to memory (or better yet, knowing them by heart!) may just help you regain your strength in times of struggle and reinvigorate your desire to do good for the animals of this Earth.

Click link below to view remainder and to comment:

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/animalsandnature/14-quotes-every-animal-advocate-should-know-by-heart/

Feel Good Sunday: Rescue at The Rainbow Bridge

Author Unkown

rainbow-bridge-v4

Unlike most days at Rainbow Bridge, this day dawned cold and gray, damp as a swamp and as dismal as could be imagined. All of the recent arrivals had no idea what to think, as they had never experienced a day like this before.  But the animals who had been waiting for their beloved people knew exactly what was going on and started to gather at the pathway leading to The Bridge to watch.

It wasn’t long before an elderly animal came into view, head hung low and tail dragging. The other animals, the ones who had been there for a while, knew what his story was right away, for they had seen this happen far too often.

He approached slowly, obviously in great emotional pain, but with no sign of injury or illness. Unlike all of the other animals waiting at The Bridge, this animal had not been restored to youth and made healthy and vigorous again. As he walked toward The Bridge, he watched all of the other animals watching him. He knew he was out of place here and the sooner he could cross  over, the happier he would be.

But, alas, as he approached The Bridge, his way was barred by the appearance of an Angel who apologized, but told him that he would not be able to pass. Only those animals who were with their people could pass over Rainbow Bridge.

With no place else to turn to, the elderly animal turned towards the fields before The Bridge and saw a group of other animals like himself, also elderly and infirm. They weren’t playing, but rather simply lying on the green grass, forlornly staring out at the pathway leading to The Bridge. And so, he took his place among them, watching the pathway and waiting.

One of the newest arrivals at The Bridge didn’t understand what he had just witnessed and asked one of the animals that had been there for a while to explain it to him.

You see, that poor animal was a rescue. He was turned in to rescue just as you see him now, an older animal with his fur graying and his eyes clouding. He never made it out of rescue and passed on with only the love of his rescuer to comfort him as he left his earthly existence. Because he had no family to give his love to, he has no one to escort him across The Bridge.

The first animal thought about this for a minute and then asked, “So what will happen now?” As he was about to receive his answer, the clouds suddenly parted and the gloom lifted. Approaching The Bridge could be seen a single person and among the older animals, a whole group was suddenly bathed in a golden light and they were all young and healthy again, just as they were in the prime of life.

“Watch, and see” said the second animal. A second group of animals from those waiting came to the pathway and bowed low as the person neared. At each bowed head, the person offered a pat on the head or a scratch behind the ears. The newly restored animals fell into line and followed him towards The Bridge. They all crossed The Bridge together.

“What happened?”

“That was a rescuer.” The animals you saw bowing in respect were those who found new homes because of his work.  They will cross when their new families arrive. Those you saw restored were those who never found homes. When a rescuer arrives, they are allowed to perform one, final act of rescue. They are allowed to escort those poor animals that they couldn’t place on earth, across The Rainbow Bridge.

“I think I like rescuers,” said the first animal.

“So does GOD,” was the reply.

Where do the presidential candidates stand on humane issues?

2B02F74A00000578-3182475-The_brazen_dentist_has_also_kitted_out_the_taxidermy_showroom_wi-a-2_1438465223173

Walter Palmer (left), who killed Cecil the lion.

Source:  wisconsingazette.com

Want to know where the presidential candidates stand on humane issues? A look at the top contenders in both political parties:

Hillary Clinton: In the U.S. Senate, she earned a 100 percent score on the Humane Scorecard in the 108th and 109th Congresses and an 83 in the 110th. She cosponsored legislation dealing with horse slaughter and animal fighting, as well as bills to stop the processing of “downer” livestock and to crack down on abusive puppy mills. She also led efforts to stop the overuse of antibiotics in farm animals. Additionally, Clinton signed letters requesting more funds for the U.S. Department of Agriculture to enforce the Animal Welfare Act, the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act and the federal animal fighting law.

During the 2008 campaign, she voiced concern over the slaughter of sick and injured cows whose meat was channeled into the national school lunch program.

As secretary of state, she led international efforts to crack down on wildlife trafficking and, through the Clinton Foundation, she helped to launch a major campaign to fight the illegal ivory trade and poaching of elephants.

Bernie Sanders: Sanders has been a steady and consistent supporter of animal protection in Congress. As a House member, he earned a 58 percent on the Humane Scorecard for the 103rd Congress, 75 percent in the 104th, 60 percent in the 108th and a 100 percent score in the 106th and 109th. As a senator, he scored 100 percent in the 110th, 112th, and 113th Congresses, an 89 in the 111th and an 86 percent in the most recent session.

In the current session, Sanders is cosponsoring legislation to protect pets in domestic violence, ban horse slaughter for human consumption, create a felony penalty for malicious animal cruelty and a crack down on horse soring abuses. He opposed the weakening of the Endangered Species Act.

In previous sessions, he cosponsored bills to crack down on puppy mills and animal fighting, to restrict the private trade in big cats and primates as exotic pets and to ban barren battery cages for egg-laying hens. He also helped to lead an effort to end the use of chimpanzees in invasive research.

Sanders was the first presidential candidate to publish an animal welfare statement and it’s a strong and compelling one that demonstrates his concern for the issues, as well as his leadership.

In the GOP

Donald Trump: When Trump owned the Steel Pier in Atlantic City, he reportedly was involved in canceling an inhumane horse-diving act. On the down side, he has defended his sons’ trophy hunting of African wildlife, including giraffes, buffaloes and lions. Trump also lamented Ringling Bros.’ decision to phase out its performing elephants.

Ben Carson: Carson has said little about animal welfare issues throughout his career, but he says in interviews that he is mostly vegetarian, and, in a 1990 interview with Vegetarian Times he shared his belief that “eventually there will no longer be a reason for most people to eat meat. And animals will breathe a sigh of relief.”

Ted Cruz: Cruz received a score of 12 percent in the 113th Congress and received a zero for the first session of the 114th Congress. He is not cosponsoring any current animal protection legislation.

Marco Rubio: Rubio was among a handful of senators who opposed a floor amendment to ban bringing children to animal fights. He scored 28 percent on the Humane Scorecard for the 112th Congress. He received a score of 12 percent for the 113th and he scored a zero in the first session of the 114th. On the positive side, Rubio cosponsored legislation to strengthen enforcement against horse soring in the previous Congress and, in the Florida Legislature, he sponsored a bill to strengthen an animal fighting statute.

John Kasich: As governor of Ohio, Kasich acted swiftly in response to the release of dozens of bears, lions, tigers, wolves and other exotic animals in Zanesville, setting a moratorium on the sale of exotic animals. He has signed bills upgrading laws on animal cruelty and puppy mills and allowing pets to be included in domestic violence protective orders. He entered the governor’s office following an agreement between The HSUS and the state, and he’s done a creditable job of handling the provisions — including the phase-out of veal crates for calves, gestation crates for breeding pigs, tail-docking of dairy cattle and protections for “downer” cows.

Video: Restore Your Faith in Humanity in 4 Minutes Flat

“A special heart warming ‘Feel Good Sunday’ submission from our good friend, Grandma Gregg!  I will say no more other than you should have tissues handy as this production made this hardened old coot’s eyes leak.  Keep the faith my very fine friends!!!” ~ R.T.

Animal’s Angels Auction Goes Live

Animals’ Angels second online Art Auction has started!

Still looking for the perfect gift? Animal’s Angels have received some incredible artwork from remarkable wild horse photographers such as  Carol Walker, Terry Fitch, Cat Kindsfather, Melody Perez, Katleen Selig, Ellen Holcumb, Craig Downer, and many more, who kindly donated their works to support our cause. The proceeds of this auction will be used to help finance a wild horse investigation. Please check out the listings (HERE)

 

Kathleen Selig-_Do_you_see_me  

Wild Horse Print “Do you see me? by Katleen Selig / Art Hills Studios, Gorgeous Pastel on 18 x 24 paper not framed. Artwork will be shipped by artist directly to highest bidder after payment has been received by Animals’ Angels. http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/art-hill-studios.html

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 


Melody Perez_-_Picassos_Palette  

 

 

Wild Horse Print “Picasso’s Palette” by Melody Perez, Gorgeous print of Picasso signed by author and limited edition. Retail value $175.00 and Matted. www.runninghorses.org

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!
 

Melody Perez_-_Wild_Innocence

 

 

 

Wild Horse Print “Wild Innocence (Picasso’s colt of 2010)” by Melody Perez, Stunning print of a Picasso’s colt. Retail value $55.00 Matted.

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!
 

Ellen Holcomb_-_Jupiter_and_Moonshadow  

 

 

Wild Horse Print “Jupiter, Blue Moon & Moon-shadow” by Ellen Holcomb, Gorgeous print of three stallions and the full moon. 13 x 19 glossy photo paper. These three stallions were captured during the final days of Triple B roundup in August 2011.  They were sent to Palomino Valley Complex instead of Gunnison UT. Artwork will be shipped by artist directly to highest bidder after payment has been received by Animals’ Angels. http://sundancedigitalstudio.com/Home.html

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!
 

Ellen Holcomb_-Lobos_herd_kicking_up_the_dust  

 

 

Wild Horse Print “Lobos Herd kicking up the dust” by Ellen Holcomb, Gorgeous print of the Lobos Herd. 13 x 19 glossy photo paper. Artwork will be shipped by artist directly to highest bidder after payment has been received by Animals’ Angels.

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 

Ellen Holcomb_-_VR_band_of_boys_filmstrip

 

 

 

Wild Horse Print “VR Band of Boys” by Ellen Holcomb, Fantastic Wild Horse print. 13 x 19 glossy photo paper. Artwork will be shipped by artist directly to highest bidder after payment has been received by Animals’ Angels.

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Craig Downer_Wild_horse_band_1

 

 

 

 

Beautiful print of Wild Horse Band of the Desatoya Range by Craig Downer, 8 x 12 glossy photo paper, signed. Image shows a wild horse band just south of New Pass in the northern escarpments of the Desatoya Range in central Nevada. Picture taken June 30, 2011. Black stallion on the left.

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 

Craig Downer_Wild_horse_band_3

 

 

 

 

Stunning print of Wild Horse Band of the Desatoya Range by Craig Downer, 8 x 12 glossy photo paper, signed. Image shows a wild horse band just south of New Pass in the northern escarpments of the Desatoya Range in central Nevada. Picture taken June 30, 2011. Black stallion on the left.

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!
 

Craig Downer_Three_mares

 

Beautiful print of Wild Horses of the Desatoya Range by Craig Downer, 8 x 12 glossy photo paper, signed. Image shows a wild horse band just south of New Pass in the northern escarpments of the Desatoya Range in central Nevada. Picture taken June 30, 2011.

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 

Cat Kindsfather_-_sad_foal_1

 

 

 

 Beautiful print of a “Sad Foal” at Broken Arrow by Cat Kindsfather, 8 x 12 glossy photo paper, signed. Image shows a foal was from the Calico Mountains. Picture taken at the Broken Arrow/Indian Lakes facility near Fallon, NV.

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 

 

 


Cat Kindsfather_-_Shadow_of_my_prison
 

 

 

Beautiful print of a mare at Broken Arrow “The Shadow of my prison” by Cat Kindsfather, 8 x 12 glossy photo paper, signed. Mare was from the calico mountains. Picture taken at the Broken Arrow/Indian Lakes facility near Fallon, NV.

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 
 

Cat Kindsfather_-_Wild_Diva

 

Gorgeous Wild Horse Print “Wild Diva” by Cat Kindsfather.  8 x 10

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 

Cat Kindsfather_-_Nevada_Family_Band  
 

Beautiful Print “Nevada Family Band”, by Cat Kindsfather.  A proud Stallion & his family, which includes a sweet pinto yearling, 8 x 10

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Cat Kindsfather_-_Fairy_Knots  

 

Great Print “Fairy Knots” by Cat Kindsfather.  Two pinto horse portrait, 8 x 10.

Click Here to place your big on ebay now

Terry Finch_-_Bachelor_Stallions  

 

Gorgeous Print “Bachelor Stallions” by Terry Fitch, 8 x 10 signed by artist.  Picture was taking in Pryor Mountains. www.wildhorsefreedomfederation.org

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!


 

 

 

Terry Finch_-_Wild_Burros  

 


 

 

Gorgeous Wild Burro Print by Terry Fitch, 8 x 10 signed by artist.  Picture was taking in Big Bend State Park. www.wildhorsefreedomfederation.org

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Terry Fitch_-_Flint  

 


 

Remarkable Print of Stallion “Flint” by Terry Fitch, signed by artist.  Flint is Cloud’s Stepson, picture was taken at the Pryor Mountains. www.wildhorsefreedomfederation.org

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Terry Fitch_-_Frolicking_Foals  



 
Stunning Print “Frolicking Foal” by Terry Fitch, 8 x 10 signed by artist.  Picture was taking at the Pryor Mountains. www.wildhorsefreedomfederation.org

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 

Carol Walker_-_Black__White_Stallion_Comes_Close  


Beautiful print of “Black and White Stallion Comes Close” by Carol Walker, 11 x 17 print, signed. Image shows a stallion named Washakie in a quiet moment in McCullough Peaks, WY www.livingimagesCJW.com

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!


 

 

Carol Walker_-_Horse_Photography  

Horse Photography Signed Book by Carol Walker www.LivingImagesCJW.com

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Carol Walker_-_Red_Roan_Stallion_Waiting_for_His_Family Beautiful print of “Red Road Stallion Waiting for His Family” by Carol Walker, 11 x 17 print, signed. Image shows a red road stallion pauses, waiting for his family as the helicopter chases them in Adobe Town, WY. www.livingimagesCJW.com

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Carol Walker_-_Running_into_the_Storm Beautiful print of “Running into the Storm” by Carol Walker, 11 x 14 print, signed. Image shows a stallion and his two year old son run as a storm is coming in Adobe Town, WY http://www.livingimagesCJW.com

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 Carol Walker_-_Sax_at_play Beautiful print of “Sax at Play” by Carol Walker, 5 x 7 print, signed. Image shows Sax rearing up behink his mother Phoenix in the Pryor Mountains of MT. www.livingimagesCJW.com

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 Carol Walker_-_Still_Free Beautiful print of “Still Free” by Carol Walker, 11 x 14 print, signed. Image shows a small wild band in Adobe Town, WY after the 2010 roundup.www.livingimagesCJW.com

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Carol Walker_-_Tail_Chewer Beautiful print of “Tail Chewer” by Carol Walker, 11 x 14 print, signed. Image shows Firecracker, a wild foal, chews on Bolder’s tail in the Pryor Mountains of MT. www.livingimagesCJW.com

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 Carol Walker_-_The_Red_Roan_Stallion  

Beautiful print of “The Red Roan Stallion” by Carol Walker, 8 x 10 print, signed. Image shows a Red Roan band stallion in the White Mountain Herd Area in WY http://www.livingimagesCJW.com

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Carol Walker_-_Wild_Hoofbeats_Book_Signed  

Wild Hoofbeats Signed Book by Carol Walker www.LivingImagesCJW.com

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Edwina Garcia_-_Among_the_Yucca Gorgeous print named “Among the Yucca”, by artist Edwina Garcia, 8×10, signed on
back. Picture was taken January 13, 2012 in New Mexico.

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Edwina Garcia_-_Silver_Soul Gorgeous print named “Silver Soul”, by artist Edwina Garcia, 8×10, signed on
back. Picture was taken January 13, 2012 in New Mexico.

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

Edwina Garcia_-_Family Gorgeous print named “Family”, by artist Edwina Garcia, 8×10, signed on
back. Picture was taken January 13, 2012 in New Mexico.

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

 Edwina Garcia_-_Spain Gorgeous print named “Spain”, by artist Edwina Garcia, 8×10, signed on
back. Picture was taken January 13, 2012 in New Mexico.

 

Click here to place your bid on ebay now!

For Our Animals the Good, the Bad and the Ugly Reside in DC

News Bulletin from the Humane Society of the United States

Some good news, some bad news but NO news for the Horses

Photo by Tanya Ashani

On the up side, the U.S. Senate last night gave unanimous approval to legislation to crack down on animal crush videos—the vile depictions of staged scenes in which scantily clad women maim and torture animals for the sexual gratification of viewers. I’ve written about it several times before, and the first reaction of any decent person is shock that anyone could possibly be so cruel to participate in making or watching this perversion. All good people are rightly outraged and disgusted by the idea of someone torturing and killing animals just for the sexual titillation of others. The bill, pushed by Sens. Jon Kyl, R. Ariz., Jeff Merkley, D. Ore., and Richard Burr, R. N.C., must now go back to the House, and we hope that chamber approves it in rapid fashion.

The other good news is that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D. Nev., not only allowed the crush video legislation to come up for a vote, but he also personally offered motions to pass five other bills that had already been approved by the House: S. 1748—Southern Sea Otter Recovery and Research Act, S. 850—Shark Conservation Act, S. 859—Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Amendments, S. 529—Great Cats and Rare Canids Act, and H.R. 388—Crane Conservation Act.

The bad news is that Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., blocked all of the bills, denying final congressional action on a series of humane measures that deserve approval. Coburn did so under the pretense of fiscal restraint. But these measures cost very little, and they were all advanced to protect wild creatures from cruelty and in some cases from extinction. It’s worth the very modest investment to prevent such awful outcomes.

One can understand Sen. Coburn’s interest in fiscal restraint. But in his case, it is an obsession, and it borders on a mania. Lawmakers serve the public to balance a variety of interests, and not to see any topic in isolation or to magnify it and distort it. Cautious spending is an important value, but so is the defense of animals from cruelty, the rescue of marine creatures injured by human actions, or the protection of wild species from extinction. Coburn has corrupted a laudable principle of fiscal conservatism, and used it to negate and nullify valuable initiatives designed to protect vulnerable species at serious risk. In that sense, his is a fanatical devotion to a principle, and a misuse of power.

There’s another principle at work, and that’s the subversion of democratic decision-making. The Senate is a body of 100 individuals, elected by the people of all 50 states. Though it generally operates by the principle of majority rule, the Senate has a tradition of allowing individual lawmakers to place “holds” on legislation, allowing a single lawmaker to block consideration even of an enormously popular and bipartisan measure. Sen. Coburn uses the “hold” like most of the rest of us drink water, going to the well time and again. He is abusing this Senate privilege, and in the process he is subverting democratic lawmaking. When 99 senators favor reform and one does not, it is wrong for the one to prevail because of the upside-down procedures of the Senate.

While Sen. Coburn’s action allows real harm of living creatures to continue, there are many other lawmakers of both parties who do care and want to see the responsible treatment of all of God’s creatures. Sens. John Kerry, Maria Cantwell, Jeff Merkley, David Vitter, Richard Burr, Barbara Boxer, and others backed the measures Sen. Reid advanced. They didn’t appreciate Sen. Coburn’s obstructionism, but were powerless to stop the naysaying of one man obsessively focused on one narrow belief.

Today, I am especially grateful to Sen. Reid for his leadership, and we hope he’ll work to get these measures enacted in the lame-duck session to follow the election. I am pasting below the speech he gave on the Senate floor last night.

Mr. REID. Mr. President, one piece of unfinished business we have here in the Senate is to move a series of good, commonsense bills that would benefit wildlife and domestic animals.

These wildlife conservation and animal welfare bills have already passed the House of Representatives, and for a good reason. They also have bipartisan support. Most importantly, all of these measures are supported by the American people. These aren’t Democratic or Republican issues; they are issues of good moral conscience.

I have worked over the years on many bills connected to animals and wildlife. Not long ago, Senator Cantwell and I worked with a number of our Republican colleagues to pass a felony level penalty bill for dog fighting and cock fighting. This was a bipartisan rejection of animal cruelty. Today, we have the opportunity to help a great number of species. One bill ready for action, the Shark Conservation Act, will improve Federal enforcement of an existing prohibition on the killing of sharks just for their fins. Because of a loophole in the existing law, animals are still caught, their fins are severed, and the dismembered shark is sent back into the ocean to die. But they don’t just die, they suffer a horrible and protracted death—all of that cruelty for a bowl of soup.

Another important bill is the Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Act, which will strengthen programs that provide emergency aid to seals, whales, and other marine creatures that get struck by boats or tangled in fishing lines. This happens all the time.

Other bills, such as the Crane Conservation Act, the Great Cats and Rare Canids Act, and the Southern Sea Otter Recovery Act, will protect some of the most rare and remarkable creatures anyplace on Earth. Without our help, many of these creatures could disappear within a generation.

I also wish to draw attention to the efforts of Senators Merkley and Kyl today to clear an important bill that will end the appalling practice of animal crush videos. It is hard for me to comprehend what some people do. They torture animals and take pictures of them and sometimes sell those pictures. There are people sick enough to want to watch a little animal or a big animal be crushed and killed. They call them animal crush videos. The law we passed in 1999 outlawing these videos was struck down by the Supreme Court in April of this year. Senators Kyl and Merkley have worked to write a more narrowly tailored bill that respects the first amendment while still punishing those who seek to profit from the torture of puppies, kittens, and other helpless animals.

As I understand it, the Supreme Court said you can’t stop people from buying these videos to watch. But we can stop people from doing these terrible things that people want to watch.

I hope we can work these out and pass these by unanimous consent. Why do we need debate on these issues? These are good bipartisan bills that deserve to be passed.