Australia revealed in top 10 of donkey skin product importers

Source: Horsetalk.co.nz

The new report shows that the ejiao market is expected to maintain a growth rate of 15% annually from 2015 to 2020…

Australian consumers are playing a significant role in the global ejiao market, with the Northern Territory government said to be researching donkey farming with a view to exporting skins to China.  

Australia’s role as the eighth largest importer of donkey-hide gelatin (DHG or ejiao) was revealed in a  new investigative report released today by Humane Society International Australia, which explores the current state of China’s ejiao market, an industry wreaking havoc on global donkey populations. Ejiao products are widely available in Australia.

Donkey skins are boiled and the gelatin extracted to produce ejiao, an increasingly popular traditional Chinese medicine. It is hailed as a miracle elixir in China and is heavily marketed as a cure for everything from anaemia to impotence despite no scientific evidence of any health benefits.  Earlier this year China’s National Health & Family Planning Commission posted on its official Weibo site a blog entry titled ‘Ejiao is not worth buying …‘ stating that ‘ejiao is simply boiled donkey skin’.  This sparked a major social media frenzy. They were later required to retract their statement…(CONTINUED)

https://www.horsetalk.co.nz/2018/05/08/australia-top10-donkey-skin-products/

 

‘It’s just boiled donkey skin’: Chinese health officials rubbish ‘inhumane’ product

by as published on Horse & Hound

A popular product made from the skins of donkeys has been deemed “not worth buying” by Chinese health officials.

Demand for ejiao, derived from donkey hides, has led to the slaughter of millions of donkeys in recent years.

However, China’s national health and family planning commission recently told consumers the remedy was ,“not worth buying” and despite its many health claims is “just boiled donkey skin.”

On Sunday (18 February), the commission posted on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, that ejiao, is “..not a good source of protein” and that its health claims were at best overstated.

The news was welcomed by international welfare charity, The Donkey Sanctuary.

The Donkey Sanctuary has been campaigning for a halt to the global trade in donkey skins, which utilises around four million donkey skins every year.

It is estimated that as many as 2.2 million skins are imported to China from Africa, South America and parts of Asia every year. Over the past two years, an escalating demand for skins to make the product has also resulted in poaching and theft of donkeys from individuals and communities that depend on them, with national donkey populations being halved in some countries.

“Many social media users in China shared the commission’s original posts […] but within a few hours the Weibo feeds for all of the commission’s tweets had gone offline and remains offline now,” said a spokesman for The Donkey Sanctuary.

Alex Mayers is the head of programmes at the charity and has been working at ground-level with partners around the globe to expose the donkey skin trade to protect donkeys and the communities that rely on them.

“A huge number of medical claims are made for ejiao, and despite its high price, it’s an extremely sought-after and popular product,” he said.

“This advice from the commission has resulted in a lot of discussion on social media in China, both about the claims and benefits of the product and also about it having seemingly been deleted.

“Whether there are any benefits from taking ejiao or not, our primary concern remains that the trade in skins is both inhumane and unsustainable. However if a product is not worth buying then it can’t be worth the price of destroying someone’s livelihood, and the trade is responsible for that every single time a donkey is stolen and slaughtered which itself is every single day.”

Read more at http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/chinas-national-health-and-family-planning-commission-ejiao-donkey-skin-not-worth-buying-the-donkey-sanctuary-644825#Iofpq33vlqJXVeF1.99

Under the Skin: How ejiao threatens the common ass

By Merritt Clifton editor of Animals 24-7

“…donkeys fall into a unique and difficult niche:  that of a species formerly kept almost exclusively in poorer parts of the world as a work animal…”

Click Image to Download Report

Click Image to Download Report

BEIJING––Can demand for a commodity that constitutes only one ten-thousandth of the global market for traditional Chinese medicine really pose what Donkey Rescue World blogger David C. Duncan calls “an existential threat” to barnyard animals as abundant worldwide as donkeys?

This is not about highly endangered tigers,  rhinos,  elephants,  or even pangolins,  all eight species of which were once listed by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species as “species of least concern,”  but since July 2014 are all considered “vulnerable” or “endangered” by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

This is about the common ass,  domestic animals who until recently were the tenth most abundant species in captivity,  according to United Nations Food & Agricultural Organization data.

Only chickens,  turkeys,  cattle,  pigs,  sheep,  goats,  horses,  dogs and cats (the latter not tracked by the FAO) were believed to be more numerous.

But donkeys fall into a unique and difficult niche:  that of a species formerly kept almost exclusively in poorer parts of the world as a work animal,  abruptly replaced in most uses by motor vehicles,  no longer highly valued for labor,  and therefore suddenly more valuable for hides than alive.

Further,  the demand for the gelatinous substance derived from donkey hides,  ejiao,  comes almost entirely from China,  whose population of 1.4 billion people is so large that even consumption of trivial amounts of ejiao by one person in 10,000 can require the slaughter of millions of donkeys per year.

No wild animal species––indeed,  no animal product,  period––is actually widely used in traditional Chinese medicine,  which is based overwhelmingly on floral and herbal compounds….(CONTINUED)

Read More:  http://www.animals24-7.org/2017/02/26/under-the-skin-how-ejiao-threatens-the-common-ass/

Download Report: https://www.thedonkeysanctuary.org.uk/under-the-skin/full-report

Marjorie Farabee and David Duncan on world’s donkeys being wiped out for ejiao, a fad Chinese traditional medicine, on Wild Horse & Burro Radio (Wed,. 2/15/17)

painy

Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_LogoJoin us on Wild Horse Wednesdays®, Feb. 15, 2017

6:00 pm PST … 7:00 pm MST … 8:00 pm CST … 9:00 pm EST

Listen Live (HERE!)

You can also listen to the show on your phone by calling (917) 388-4520.

You can call in with questions during the 2nd half hour, by dialing (917) 388-4520, then pressing 1.

This show will be archived so you can listen to it anytime.

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Workers lay the skins of freshly killed donkeys out to dry in Dong’e, northeast China, where they will later be boiled to produce gelatin sold as a fad health and beauty tonic (Photo: George Knowles)

Our guests tonight will be Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, Equine Mgr. of Todd Mission Ranch (TMR Rescue) & founder of Wild Burro Protection League.and donkey advocate David Duncan (Donkey Rescue World).

Millions of donkeys from Asia, Africa and South America are at risk of being stolen and slaughtered for their skins, which are used to make ejiao.  Some sources report the demand in China alone to be 10 million skins per year. Large numbers of donkeys are being slaughtered in Mexico (sourced from within Mexico and across the border in the USA).

Donkey skins are used to produce a fad health and beauty tonic sold as an unproven traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) called ejiao, otherwise known as colla corii asini.

The global demand for donkey skins is causing mass-scale suffering to donkeys and risking the livelihoods of millions of people who depend on them.

This show will be hosted by Debbie Coffey, V.P. and Dir. of Wild Horse Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation.

To contact us: ppj1@hush.com, or call 320-281-0585

TO LISTEN TO ALL ARCHIVED WILD HORSE & BURRO RADIO SHOWS, CLICK HERE.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/marti-oakley/2017/02/16/marjorie-farabee-david-duncan-donkeys-being-wiped-out-to-make-chinese-meds

1/8/17 – Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation

on BLM’s dangerous Radio Collar Study on the Adobe Town wild horses in Wyoming. Listen HERE.

 

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