BLM Releases Decision Record plan to wipe out the Red Desert Complex after they destroy the Checkerboard

by Carol Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation, Wild Horse Freedom Federation

BLM has announced it will be removing 2200 wild horses from the Red Desert Complex, starting in October 2017.  This would be after the Checkerboard Roundup, where the BLM is planning to remove 1560 wild horses starting in September.  This means 3760 wild horses will be removed from their homes and from their families, and this is over half the wild horses remaining in Wyoming.

This is insane.  Right now, Congress is considering the 2018 Budget which now includes language that will allow the killing of the 46,000 wild horses in short and long term holding as well as thousands more on the range.

Adding 3760 more horses makes absolutely no sense.  There is nowhere to even put this number of horses in short term holding unless the BLM has already begun shipping wild horses in holding to slaughter.

Rounding up and removing these horses is a death sentence to them if this budget passes without an amendment to protect the horses.

In the Red Desert Complex, the 5 herds will all be reduced to numbers below the 150-200 adults needed to maintain genetic viability. Stewart Creek will be at 150, Lost Creek at 60, Antelope Hills at 60 Crooks Mountain at 65 and Green Mountain will be left at the closest to the number needed, at 170.

The rationale is that the horses travel back and forth between areas so they consider the Complex as a whole at 480 wild horses.  But I dispute this.  There may be some mixing of the members of herds at the boundaries, but these are vast areas and horses tend to be territorial – they cannot guarantee that the horses will mix sufficiently to maintain genetic viability.  There is data provided on each herd’s genetic viability but most of this is very old data, not from the most recent roundup in 2011 and 2012.

Then they plan to use PZP-22 on all mares over 1 year old that are released back into the area.

This is a recipe for destroying these unique herds, not preserving them.

The BLM is making the worst possible decisions for the wild horses under their care, as they have been for decades.

Be sure to read Carol Walker’s blog, Wild Hoofbeats.

Wild horses face extinction in Namibia

Namibia is a country in southern Africa.

Source:  namibian.com.na

PREDATORS … Hyenas are threatening the survival of the Namib wild horses.

Namib wild horses face extinction

by Staff Reporter

THE feral horses of Namib Nauklauft in the Garub area are on the verge of extinction due to predation by hyenas.

This was revealed in a statement issued by the Namibia Wild Horses’ Foundation yesterday.

The foundation said no foal has survived since 2013, and that the horse population has steadily declined.

“Due to the drought, most of the other migratory game has moved north and east, looking for greener pastures, which leaves mainly horses as easy prey in the Garub area,” the statement reads.

Because of this, the rate of predation on the horses has increased significantly in the area over the past two months, which saw the number of mares dropping to 42.

“We estimate that at this rate, the wild horses’ population will be functionally extinct – some may still be around, but it’s inevitable that they will go extinct – by August,” the foundation said.

In its efforts to save the wild horses from extinction, the foundation intends to find suitable land that could be turned into a sanctuary in which the horses would live with the integrity of a wild population.

Read the rest of this article here.

 

 

The elephant in the room at BLM’s National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board meetings

elephant-in-the-room

The elephant in the room (photo: bassamsalem)

This is a public comment letter that K.R. Gregg, Environmental Researcher, sent to the BLM’s National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board:

April 10, 2016

National Wild Horse and Wild Burro Program National Advisory Board Members

Attention: Ramona DeLorme, 1340 Financial Boulevard, Reno, Nevada, 89502-7147

whbadvisoryboard@blm.gov

I request that this letter be provided to all board members and also be included in the official minutes and the administrative record for the meeting.  Thank you.

Re:  National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board Public Comment

Dear Sirs/Madams:

I have heard people talk about the “elephant in the room” during BLM meetings and then ignore the REAL elephant in the room, which is that there are NO excess wild horses and burros on their congressionally designated legal lands.

Do not allow the BLM and USFS and Farm Bureau, the extractive and mining giants, hunting lobbyists and the domestic livestock grazing associations to pull the wool over your eyes. There are no excess wild horses and burros on their legally designated land.

Per the 1971 Congressional Wild Horse and Burro Act, the land is to be devoted PRINCIPALLY, although not exclusively, to the wild horses and wild burros’ welfare in keeping with the multiple-use management concept of public lands. 


Definition of “principally”: First, highest, foremost in importance, rank, worth or degree, chief, mainly, largely, chiefly, especially, particularly, mostly, primarily, above all, predominantly, in the main, for the most part, first and foremost.

There is NO reason for these wild horse and burro removals and destruction procedures … because there are NO excess wild horses and burros on their legally designated land.

In 1971, when Congress passed the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, these animals were found roaming across 53,800,000 million acres. That amount of acreage could support more than about 250,000 wild horses and burros, but even after 22,200,000 acres were stolen from the American people by government agencies, the remaining 31,600,000 acres could support more than 100,000 wild horses and burros today.

It is currently independently estimated that less than 20,000 wild horses and burros are living on their legal land today and yet the government continues its aggressive removal and destructive management toward total wild horse and burro extermination.

 

There is NO reason for these wild horse and burro removals and destruction procedures because there are NO excess wild horses and burros on their legally designated land.

 

 

Today, (by 4 p.m. Mountain time) is last chance to comment to save White Mountain HMA wild mares from spaying

Don’t forget to also call the White House and your Congressional representatives.

SOURCE:  Wildhoofbeats.com

by Carol Walker

CarolWalkerWhiteMountain-009

Today is the last day to comment on the BLM’s disastrous plan to sterilize wild mares in the White Mountain Herd Management Area in Wyoming. Despite the herd numbering only 268 wild horses, which is within the AML of 209- 300 wild horses in the area, the BLM plans to team up with USGS and conduct a study, first rounding up the herd using helicopters, removing horses until there are 209 left, and putting radio collars on the mares and tail tags on the stallions to study behavior for 1 year. They plan to put radio collars on the mares, and the last time the BLM did this in 1991 many horses died. This is just not safe.  Then they plan to round them up again using helicopters, and then spaying 30-50 wild mares in the field, which is an incredibly dangerous procedure, certainly fatal to many of the mares. The sterilization of this and other herds targeted for research by the BLM and USGS spells the beginning of the end of wild horses on our public lands.

Please comment today by 4pm Mountain Time. Your own words will be the most powerful and effective for having an impact on the BLM and their plans.

You can read more here in my blog:

http://www.wildhoofbeats.com/blog/wild-horses-please-comment-on-blms-disastrous-plans-to-study-and-spay-white-mountain-mares

You can use the Cloud Foundation’s excellent talking points here:

http://us1.campaign-archive2.com/?u=b16d80346618d3ce64e8e9877&id=010bafe18c&e=936756a5da

Or if you have just enough time to write a few sentences, please be sure to cover the following points:

1. Do not round up and remove horses from White Mountain Herd Management Area. The horses are within AML. If you must round them up, use bait trapping at known water sources not a helicopter roundup.

2. Do not put radio collars and tail tags on the stallions. This is unsafe and potentially fatal for the horses. Use observation of people int he field, interns or staff, to obtain information. The horses are easily identifiable and most are easy to approach – this invasive and dangerous method is not necessary.

3. Do not spay wild mares. This is cruel, inhumane, potentially fatal for many of the mares. It is completely unnecessary. If you must use birth control on this herd, use the proven, safe, humane and reversible native PZP or PZP-22 that can be given using bait trapping and/or field darting.

Send your comments to:

BLM_WY_whitemtn_littleco_hma@blm.gov

Put “White Mountain and Little Colorado EA” in the subject line of your email.

These need to be in by 4 pm Mountain Time on today, Thursday the 14th of January. Please pass this along.

Here is the link to the BLM and USGS project:
If you want to know what is really driving this and the other Checkerboard Roundups:
Related Posts:

https://reevesimagery.wordpress.com/2016/01/06/white-mountain-roundup-spaying-scoping-the-more-you-know/

http://www.wildhoofbeats.com/blog/wild-horses-blms-sterilization-studies-are-barbaric-and-unnecessary

Mohave County Supervisors to discuss SHOOTING WILD BURROS on Jan. 19th at 9:30 am in KINGMAN, AZ

SOURCE:  WILD BURRO PROTECTION LEAGUE

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Black Mountain wild burros (photo: Marjorie Farabee)

by Marjorie Farabee, Dir. of Wild Burro Affairs, Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Shooting our wild burros is not an option!   (ACTION ALERT BELOW)

The threat:

“District 5 Sup. Steve Moss is asking staff to contact the Bureau of Land Management to reduce the burro population to 817. One option is to seek legislation to allow state agencies to issue hunting permits to bring the population under control.  Another option is to file a lawsuit against BLM.”

However, the fact is:

The Bullhead Parkway is in between the burros and the river, where the burros need to get water to survive.

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Map showing that Bullhead Parkway is in between the burros and the river.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/B…

“Three burros were killed Dec. 27 in two separate incidents on the Bullhead Parkway.  Both drivers were unhurt but their cars were heavily damaged.  Another burro had to be euthanized after it collided with a car in February 2015, also on the Parkway.  A herd of about nine burros have recently been seen on the Parkway grazing on the side of the road and in the center median.”

The title of the article below should read: Supervisors vex wild burros!

http://www.mohavedailynews.com/…/article_2f6ceeb0-b9c4-11e5…

ACTION ALERT:  What you can do:

Let the Mohave County Supervisors know that the burros are important to preserve.  Call them and politely explain why the burros should be protected.  Provide solutions.  Explain why the burros are important to protect.  Let them know about alternatives such as overpasses and underpasses to get to the Colorado river.  While these provisions are being built, they can provide stock tanks to keep the burros from crossing.

Those of you who live close to Kingman should go to this meeting and speak up for our burros.  The few remaining wild burros need you NOW.  Meeting Tuesday morning (1/19/16) at 9:30 a.m.

From the Mohave County Supervisor’s Agenda:

“Those wishing to address the Board at the Call to the Public regarding matters not on the Board agenda must fill out and submit to the Clerk a Call to the Public – Request to Speak Form located in the back of the room prior to the meeting. Action taken as a result of public comments will be limited to responding to criticism, referral to staff, or placing a matter on a future Agenda. Comments are restricted to items not on the Regular Agenda with the exception of the Consent Agenda, and must relate to matters within the jurisdiction of the Board.”

MOHAVE COUNTY SUPERVISOR BOARD:
700 West Beale Street
Kingman, AZ 86402-7000

Clerk of the Board Ginny Anderson
Telephone (928) 753-0731
FAX(928) 753-0732                                                                                                                                                                                                      TDD– (928) 753-0726

District 1 Gary Watson (928) 753-0722
District 2 Hildy Angius (928) 758-0713
District 3 Buster D. Johnson (928) 453-0724
District 4 Jean Bishop (928) 753-8618
District 5 Steven Moss (928) 758-0739
Kingman, Arizona 86402-7000
Website –www.mohavecounty.us

 

BLM Struggling to find Anti-Horse, Special Interest Individuals to Sit on Wild Horse & Burro Extinction Board

Unedited Press Release – Forward by R.T. Fitch, pres./co-founder Wild Horse Freedom Federation

BLM Advisory BoardHere’s your chance; if you belong to a special interest group that is pro-horse slaughter, large game hunting, welfare ranching and mining oriented then this is your perfect chance to jump into bed with the Department of Interior and their rogue Wild Horse and Burro outlaws.  This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to aide in managing wild horses and burros into extinction through on range ovarectimies, roundups and mismanaged sterilization drugs.  Just think of it, under the cloak of giving a damn you can sway government opinion to put more money into your pocket and maybe aide some of your federal agency buddies too, all who are exempt from accountability, investigation and prosecution.

Have no fear, regardless of all the public nominees that are truly knowledgeable about wild horses and burros, you can be a shoe-in as these are “appointed” positions so public opinion, common sense and good morale conduct means nothing.  You da man…or woman.

So gather up all your bogus credentials, start working on anti-equine statements and spread your desire to be an instrument of wild equine destruction among your colleagues and “Vim-Vim-Bala-Bim, Presto Chango” you are a member of the BLM Advisory Board.

It is really that simple, just like you.


BLM announces second call for nominations to Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board

BLM Bored Member, during March 2011 Advisory Bored meeting, actively engaged in protecting the future of wild horses and burros ~ photographer unkown

BLM Bored Member, during March 2011 Advisory Bored meeting, actively engaged in protecting the future of wild horses and burros ~ photographer unkown

The Bureau of Land Management this past week issued a second call for public nominations to fill three positions on its national Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. To be considered for selection, nominations must be submitted via email or fax by December 28, 2015, or postmarked by the same date. The BLM published its second request for nominations in the Federal Register at https://federalregister.gov/a/2015-30019.

Nominations are for a term of three years and are needed to represent the following categories of interest: humane advocacy groups, wildlife management organizations, and livestock management organizations.

Those who have already submitted a nomination in response to the first call for nominations (published in the Federal Register on Aug. 14, 2015 (80 FR 48910), do not need to resubmit. All nominations from the first and second calls will be considered together during the review process.

The Board advises the BLM, an agency of the Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, an agency of the Department of Agriculture, on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies. The Board generally meets twice a year and the BLM Director may call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve without salary, but are reimbursed for travel and per diem expenses according to government travel regulations.

The Advisory Board comprises nine members who represent a balance of interests. Each member has knowledge or special expertise that qualifies him or her to provide advice in one of the following categories: wild horse and burro advocacy; wild horse and burro research; veterinary medicine; natural resources management; humane advocacy; wildlife management; livestock management; public interest (with special knowledge of equine behavior); and public interest (with special knowledge of protection of wild horses and burros, management of wildlife, animal husbandry, or natural resource management).

Asking Questions of the BLM is UnAmericanIndividuals shall qualify to serve on the Board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. They should demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the Advisory Board; individuals may also nominate themselves. In accordance with Section 7 of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, Federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the Board.

For those interested, please submit a nomination letter and full resume. The following information must be provided: the position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered; the nominee’s first, middle, and last name; business and home addresses and phone numbers; e-mail address; present occupation/title and employer; education (colleges, degrees, major field(s) of study); career highlights; qualifications: relevant education, training, and experience; experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management; experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management); and experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions. Applicants must also indicate any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by the nominee or his/her employer; indicate whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist; and explain why the nominee wants to serve on the Board. Also, at least one letter of reference from special interests or organizations the nominee may represent must be provided.

BLM and ScienceNominations may be submitted by e-mail, fax, or regular mail. E-mail the nomination to ccowan@blm.gov. To send by U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street, N.W., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Quiana Davis, WO-260, Washington, D.C. 20240. To send by FedEx or UPS, please mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street, S.E., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Quiana Davis, Washington, D.C., 20003. Or fax to Ms. Davis at 202-912-7182. For questions, please call Ms. Cowan at 405-234-5938.

Wild Horses: Please Comment by Oct. 7th on Proposed Destruction of Red Desert Wild Horse Herds

SOURCE:  wildhoofbeats

wild horse, Antelope Hills Herd Area, Wyoming, roundup, stallion, mares, foal, helicopter

2011 Roundup in Antelope Hills HMA

by Carol Walker, Director of Field Documentation, Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Proposed Removal of over 1700 Wild Horses in the Red Desert Complex in Wyoming

Wyoming is on a Campaign to Wipe Out its Wild Horses

The BLM is currently accepting public comments on a plan to remove 1700 wild horses from Wyoming’s Red Desert Complex, which includes the following herds: Lost Creek, Stewart Creek, Green Mountain, Crooks Mountain and Antelope Hills.

Initially, when the BLM released their Scoping Document for public comment in February, the proposed action was to treat the mares with a birth control drug, PZP-22, then release them. Now the BLM has changed course and despite the thousands of comments from the public against this action, and requesting bait and water trapping rather than the cruel and inhumane method of using helicopters to chase and drive the horses, has stated that Alternative 2 which includes removing 1700 horses, 45% of all the horses left in Wyoming, and only giving fertility control to 23 mares is now the proposed action.

Alternative 1 is to remove all wild horses outside of HMA boundaries and utilize fertility control on mares to be released back to the HMA. In this alternative, 482 wild horses outside the boundaries of the HMAs would be removed and 713 mares would be treated with PZP fertility control and released along with 607 stallions. This alternative is preferable to the proposed action, but rather than removing the horses outside of the boundaries of the HMA, they should be returned to the HMA.

Read the EA here:

http://www.blm.gov/wy/st/en/info/NEPA/documents/rfo/red-desert.html

Please comment by 4pm Mountain Time on October 7 to this email address:

RedDesertComplex_HMA_WY@blm.gov

wild horse, Antelope Hills Herd Area, Wyoming, roundup, stallion, mares, foals

Antelope Hills wild horses running from the helicopter

Personalized comments work the best, so I am going to give you some items to cover, but please use your own words:

Alternative 1 should be used. Removals of wild horses from their homes must be avoided – there is no place to put them and already 50,000 wild horses filling holding facilities to capacity. Use of PZP fertility control to control the population of these herd areas should be used instead of removal.

Alternative 1 should be modified in one respect – the horses outside the HMAs should be returned to the HMAs rather than being removed.

Three of the five herds have AMLs too low to insure genetic diversity of these horses. Removal of wild horses to the low end of AML in these Herd Management Areas will jeopardize the health of these herds.

During the roundup, horses should be kept in their family bands, and they should definitely be kept within the HMAs that they came from. Horses have a complex social and family structure and should not be treated like livestock.

The public should be given 14 days notice of start date of the roundups so that interested citizens have adequate time to arrange to observe the roundups.

Land Use Plans should be revised to allow AMLs to be raised for all of these Herd Management Areas, and livestock grazing should be reduced. Wild Horses should be managed as the principle species where they are found, according to the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971.

Again, please comment by 4pm Mountain Time on October 7:

RedDesertComplex_HMA_WY@blm.gov

and here:

Benjamin Smith, Wild Horse & Burro Specialist
BLM Rawlins Field Office
1300 N. 3rd Street
Rawlins, WY 82301
(307) 328-4200
Email: reddesertcomplex_hma_wy@blm.gov
Jeremie Artery, Wild Horse & Burro Specialist (Acting)
BLM Lander Field Office
1335 Main Street
Lander, WY 82520
(307) 332-8400
Email: reddesertcomplex_hma_wy@blm.gov

#FightingForFreedom

___________________________________

Carol Walker is the Director of Field Documentation on the Board of Directors for Wild Horse Freedom Federation, which is dedicated to stopping the roundups and keeping our wild horses wild and free.  Carol’s websites are:  wildhoofbeats.com and Living Images by Carol Walker

image

Eleven years ago, Carol began photographing wild horses. As she followed several herds in Wyoming, Colorado and Montana, she became aware of how precarious their situation on public lands has become.  Since then, she has dedicated herself to educating people with her photographs and stories about the wild horses. She is one of the leading advocates working to keep America’s wild horses wild and free on our public lands.  Her award-winning book Wild Hoofbeats: America’s Vanishing Wild Horses The book was released winter of 2008 and is currently in its third printing. Carol’s second book, Horse Photography: The Dynamic Guide for Horse Lovers is in its second printing. Carol’s third book, Mustangs: Wild Horses at the Heart of the American Legend was published in October 2014 in France.

Proceeds from the sales of Carol’s artwork and books fund her work to keep America’s wild horses wild and free.  Carol produces a calendar of her image each year to benefit Wild Horse Freedom Federation.

 

 

The Cloud Foundation Denounces BLM Wild Horse Research Plans

Press release issued by The Cloud Foundation

BLM sterilization studies spell doom for remaining wild horses on public lands

photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO, (July 8, 2015) – “The Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) announcement of plans for managing wild horses on public lands is not only disturbing but highlights their commitment to managing wild horses to extinction,” stated Ginger Kathrens, Volunteer Executive Director of The Cloud Foundation (TCF).

Four of the seven proposals being researched at taxpayer expense include permanent sterilization of stallions and/or mares. While the BLM claims they are committed to developing new tools that allow us to manage this program sustainably and for the benefit of the animals and the land,” and “for the enjoyment of generations to come,” their proposed solutions are contrary to that goal.  Permanent sterilization of wild horses on the range would continue to undermine the already threatened genetic viability of our remaining herds.  Under current plans, BLM would manage 78% of herds at a level below that required to ensure genetic viability (150-200 adult horses.)

Permanent sterilization is inconsistent with the 1971 Wild Horse and Burro Act which requires managing for sustainable herds. Permanent sterilization is counter to that mandate and would damage the social band structure that has allowed wild horses in North America to thrive.

Earlier this year representatives from several wild horse and rangeland preservation organizations met in Washington, D.C. with BLM Director Neill Kornze, and BLM Deputy Assistant Director for Resources and Planning, Mike Tupper, to discuss possible solutions to BLM’s ongoing dilemma regarding management of wild horses and burros.  The proposals presented included strategies for increasing the number of mares vaccinated with PZP to a level that will begin to impact population growth rates, and measures to authorize and encourage voluntary livestock grazing permit retirement in Herd Management Areas.  The groups also recommended repatriation of wild horses in BLM holding facilities to Herd Areas that have been zeroed-out. These proposed solutions would provide an immediate savings to the BLM.

Mike Tupper promised to respond to TCF and the other organizations regarding the proposals but has failed to do so.  “Advocates are more than willing to work with the BLM for sustainable management of wild horses on the range,” stated Paula Todd King, Communications Director for TCF. “Thus far the Washington, DC BLM is unwilling to consider creative options that would benefit both wild horse herds and the American taxpayer. “

Safe and effective birth control for wild horses has been available for years but BLM has chosen to use it on only a token number of mares,” continued Kathrens. “The Pryor Wild Horse Herd in Montana, the McCullough Peaks Herd in Wyoming, the Little Book Cliffs and Spring Creek Herds in Colorado are managed using PZP, a reversible remotely delivered vaccine. All these herds are nearly to the point of achieving a balance between reproduction and natural mortality.”

“Unlike the national BLM offices, these local field offices are working successfully with the public to create a situation where future wild horse removals are unnecessary,” concluded Kathrens. “Stonewalling of advocates and the American public by the National BLM office is counter-productive to successful management of wild horses on our public lands.  I fear that their actions would lead to the extinction of the North American wild horse.”

Wild Burros on Brink of Extinction in America! Marjorie Farabee, Director of Wild Burro Affairs on Wild Horse & Burro Radio (1/7/15)

painy

Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_Logo

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015

5:00 pm PST … 6:00 pm MST … 7:00 pm CST … 8:00 pm EST

Listen Live Here!

Call in # 917-388-4520

We have a new 1 hour format.  Please call in after the first half hour with questions.

The shows will be archived, so you can listen anytime.

_____________________________________________

marjorieandabbywhff

Tonight’s guest is Marjorie Farabee, Director of Wild Burro Affairs for Wild Horse Freedom Federation. Marjorie is also the Equine Mgr. of Todd Mission Ranch (home of TMR Rescue) and founder of Wild Burro Protection League.

America’s wild burros are running out of time.  Their numbers are so few that they are dangerously close to extinction, but the Bureau of Land Management continues to remove them from public lands.

Tonight’s radio show will be co-hosted by R.T. Fitch, President of Wild Horse Freedom Federation, and Terry Fitch, Treasurer of Wild Horse Freedom Federation, and award winning photographer.

Horseback May Issue

Continue reading

The most endangered wild horse in the world

SOURCE: arkwild.org

Only one Abaco Spanish Colonial Horse left

Six decades ago there were 200 or more wild horses on Great Abaco Island, Bahamas.  These horses were the time-capsuled descendants of the horses that Christopher Columbus brought with him to the New World, at the end of the 15th Century.

They lived independently and undisturbed until man disrupted the balance.  All but three were slaughtered in the early 1960s.

They came back to 35 animals by the mid 1990s.  But a hurricane pushed the horses out of their now destroyed forest habitat, where they had thrived for so long, into a lush and toxic citrus plantation that was hurricane-damaged and littered with chemicals, destroyed buildings, too-rich pastures, and poisonous plants.

It was the beginning of the end for the horses.  Despite the best efforts of Milanne Rehor, the woman who has dedicated 20 years to rescuing the animals from their destructive circumstances, the herd has been reduced to one mare.

The Wild Horses of Abaco Preservation Society, and Arkwild, Inc., need your help to turn this situation around.  The world has stayed at arm’s length for long enough; it’s time to step up, to recognize what has been lost, and to save what is still here: the last mare and her future offspring.

Their facebook page is HERE.  Please take a moment to give them a LIKE.  Lets do what we can to help.