BLM Struggling to find Anti-Horse, Special Interest Individuals to Sit on Wild Horse & Burro Extinction Board

Unedited Press Release – Forward by R.T. Fitch, pres./co-founder Wild Horse Freedom Federation

BLM Advisory BoardHere’s your chance; if you belong to a special interest group that is pro-horse slaughter, large game hunting, welfare ranching and mining oriented then this is your perfect chance to jump into bed with the Department of Interior and their rogue Wild Horse and Burro outlaws.  This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to aide in managing wild horses and burros into extinction through on range ovarectimies, roundups and mismanaged sterilization drugs.  Just think of it, under the cloak of giving a damn you can sway government opinion to put more money into your pocket and maybe aide some of your federal agency buddies too, all who are exempt from accountability, investigation and prosecution.

Have no fear, regardless of all the public nominees that are truly knowledgeable about wild horses and burros, you can be a shoe-in as these are “appointed” positions so public opinion, common sense and good morale conduct means nothing.  You da man…or woman.

So gather up all your bogus credentials, start working on anti-equine statements and spread your desire to be an instrument of wild equine destruction among your colleagues and “Vim-Vim-Bala-Bim, Presto Chango” you are a member of the BLM Advisory Board.

It is really that simple, just like you.


BLM announces second call for nominations to Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board

BLM Bored Member, during March 2011 Advisory Bored meeting, actively engaged in protecting the future of wild horses and burros ~ photographer unkown

BLM Bored Member, during March 2011 Advisory Bored meeting, actively engaged in protecting the future of wild horses and burros ~ photographer unkown

The Bureau of Land Management this past week issued a second call for public nominations to fill three positions on its national Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. To be considered for selection, nominations must be submitted via email or fax by December 28, 2015, or postmarked by the same date. The BLM published its second request for nominations in the Federal Register at https://federalregister.gov/a/2015-30019.

Nominations are for a term of three years and are needed to represent the following categories of interest: humane advocacy groups, wildlife management organizations, and livestock management organizations.

Those who have already submitted a nomination in response to the first call for nominations (published in the Federal Register on Aug. 14, 2015 (80 FR 48910), do not need to resubmit. All nominations from the first and second calls will be considered together during the review process.

The Board advises the BLM, an agency of the Department of the Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, an agency of the Department of Agriculture, on the protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies. The Board generally meets twice a year and the BLM Director may call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve without salary, but are reimbursed for travel and per diem expenses according to government travel regulations.

The Advisory Board comprises nine members who represent a balance of interests. Each member has knowledge or special expertise that qualifies him or her to provide advice in one of the following categories: wild horse and burro advocacy; wild horse and burro research; veterinary medicine; natural resources management; humane advocacy; wildlife management; livestock management; public interest (with special knowledge of equine behavior); and public interest (with special knowledge of protection of wild horses and burros, management of wildlife, animal husbandry, or natural resource management).

Asking Questions of the BLM is UnAmericanIndividuals shall qualify to serve on the Board because of their education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. They should demonstrate experience or knowledge of the area of their expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

Any individual or organization may nominate one or more persons to serve on the Advisory Board; individuals may also nominate themselves. In accordance with Section 7 of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, Federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the Board.

For those interested, please submit a nomination letter and full resume. The following information must be provided: the position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered; the nominee’s first, middle, and last name; business and home addresses and phone numbers; e-mail address; present occupation/title and employer; education (colleges, degrees, major field(s) of study); career highlights; qualifications: relevant education, training, and experience; experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management; experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management); and experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions. Applicants must also indicate any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by the nominee or his/her employer; indicate whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist; and explain why the nominee wants to serve on the Board. Also, at least one letter of reference from special interests or organizations the nominee may represent must be provided.

BLM and ScienceNominations may be submitted by e-mail, fax, or regular mail. E-mail the nomination to ccowan@blm.gov. To send by U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street, N.W., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Quiana Davis, WO-260, Washington, D.C. 20240. To send by FedEx or UPS, please mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street, S.E., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Quiana Davis, Washington, D.C., 20003. Or fax to Ms. Davis at 202-912-7182. For questions, please call Ms. Cowan at 405-234-5938.

BLM to Remove 1,300 Wild Horses in West this Summer

by Martin Griffith as published in the Deseret News

“The agency still has not gotten the message that the removal of wild horses from our Western public lands is inhumane, unsustainable, unscientific, and must come to an end…”

RENO, Nev. — U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials say they plan to remove only 1,300 wild horses and burros from the range across the West this summer because of budget constraints and overflowing holding pens.

Overall, they intend to remove about 4,800 of the animals from the range during the current fiscal year ending Sept. 30, compared with 8,255 in the last fiscal year. The vast majority of targeted animals will be wild horses.

Nine of the BLM’s 16 summer roundups will be conducted in Nevada, home to roughly half of the estimated 37,000 free-roaming wild horses and burros in the West. The agency plans to remove 855 wild horses and burros in Nevada, 140 in Oregon, 105 in Arizona, 65 in New Mexico, 50 in Colorado and 25 in Idaho.

The BLM made the announcement Friday, about a month after 30 U.S. representatives urged new U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell to make reforming the government’s wild horse management program and its spiraling budget a priority.

The American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign coalition criticized the BLM’s plans, saying the captured animals will be added to government-funded holding facilities that are already at capacity with 50,000 wild horses and burros.

“The BLM is galloping ahead with rounding up more wild horses, despite the high cost to taxpayers and animals as well as the findings of an independent scientific review, which recommends against continued roundups,” coalition spokeswoman Suzanne Roy said in a statement.

“The agency still has not gotten the message that the removal of wild horses from our Western public lands is inhumane, unsustainable, unscientific, and must come to an end,” she added.

BLM spokesman Tom Gorey said most of the upcoming “gathers” have been scheduled in response to emergency conditions spurred by drought, and by public safety issues related to animals that roam near highways and residential and agricultural areas.

He said the schedule is subject to change because of continuing drought conditions across the West that are resulting in limited water and forage for wildlife, livestock and wild horses and burros.

“BLM managers are monitoring animal and range conditions, reducing livestock grazing, enacting fire restrictions and providing supplemental water in some locations for wild horses,” Gorey said in a statement.

Six roundups in Nevada will use helicopters to guide the animals to pens, while the rest of the operations will use bait and water to trap them in corrals.

The BLM has no plans to administer fertility control vaccines to horses this summer except for some mares in Colorado, Gorey said. Instead, the agency intends to use fertility-control treatments during roundups before breeding season — between November and February — when the vaccines are most effective.

An independent scientific review of horse roundups, which was released in May, recommended that the government invest in widespread fertility control of the mustangs and let nature cull any excess herds instead of spending millions to house them in overflowing holding pens.

The 14-member panel assembled by the National Academy of Sciences‘ National Research Council and Management concluded BLM’s removal of nearly 100,000 horses from the Western range over the past decade is probably having the opposite effect of its intention to ease ecological damage and reduce overpopulated herds.

By stepping in prematurely when food and water supplies remain adequate, BLM is producing artificial conditions that ultimately serve to perpetuate population growth, the committee found.

Click (HERE) to comment at the Deseret News

New Interior Secretary Can Turn Around Broken Wild Horse Program

Source: A Humane Nation ~ Wayne Pacelle‘s Blog

“…the situation unfolding at Palomino Valley is yet another symptom of a broken horse and burro program…”

"Why", the question asked at Palomino Valley ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

“Why”, the question asked at Palomino Valley ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Those of you who regularly watch our good friend Jane Velez-Mitchell’s show on HLN may have seen me last night in a brief segment talking about a potentially dangerous situation for 1,800 captive wild horses at a Bureau of Land Management facility near Reno, Nev., where temperatures have been reaching record highs exceeding 100 degrees this month. Despite the fact that the BLM requires those adopting wild horses from the agency to provide adequate shelter, there is no shelter for the horses at the Palomino Valley National Adoption Center. Our request is hardly unprecedented, since the BLM has installed shelters at other facilities, like the one in Ridgecrest, CA.

After several wild horse advocates brought this matter to our attention, we wrote a letter to the BLM, urging the agency to develop a shelter to provide some protection from the sun at the Palomino Valley National Adoption Center. Thus far, the BLM has installed a sprinkler system, but no shelter. Newly confirmed Interior Secretary Sally Jewell can take action to show she’s serious about reform of this program.

While an important welfare issue for the horses, the situation unfolding at Palomino Valley is yet another symptom of a broken horse and burro program. The central problem is that the BLM continues to round up and remove thousands of wild horses and to aggregate more horses than it can responsibly care for at short-term and long-term holding facilities, all at an enormous expense to taxpayers and to horses, and in defiance of the spirit of the federal law designed to protect them.

We have only about 40,000 wild horses and burros living on our public lands today, but we have almost 50,000 in holding facilities. This is not what the drafters of the original Wild Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act could ever have imagined, and the BLM knows that it’s removing more animals from the range than the agency can possibly hope to adopt out to loving homes – yet the round up and removal treadmill persists. This is the larger problem that Secretary Jewell confronts.

The only way the BLM will ever right the sinking ship that has become its Wild Horse & Burro Program is by immediately implementing the recommendations of a report prepared by the National Academies of Sciences’ National Research Council panel which, among its key findings, urged the agency to end its reliance on short-sighted roundups, and instead, to keep horses on the range while humanely limiting reproduction through the application of a contraceptive vaccine. And just recently, The HSUS also developed and presented a proposal to the agency for a bold new program that meets the challenges of the budget, the horse population and land-use issues head on.

We are ready to work with the BLM to address its continuing troubles in this area and to solve them for the long term. But in the meantime, the BLM needs to do right by the animals in its care and the best place to start is by providing the 1,800 wild horses at PVC with the shelter they so desperately need.

Dept. of Interior Responds to Congressional Letter on Wild Horses

KRNV Reno News 4

Ken Salazar may be gone but the damage he caused the wild horses and burros still remains.

Ken Salazar may be gone but the damage he caused the wild horses and burros still remains.

You’ll have to click on the link above to read the article, since AP is not allowing this copyrighted material to be published or redistributed, we cannot copy the text here.

Just as BLM set a very narrow scope in the parameters of the study by the National Academy of Sciences, after 30 Congressional representatives sent a letter to Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell, to ask for the reform of the Wild Horse & Burro Management Program, it seems the Dept. of Interior will only be responding to “additional opportunities for population control.”

But, it’s a big deal they even responded.  Ken Salazar didn’t bother to respond.

It is our hope that the Department of the Interior doesn’t omit reform issues like humane handling and BLM’s fraudulent Environmental Assessments that blame degradation of the range on only the wild horses, while there is an increase in oil and gas development (AND FRACKING), mining, livestock grazing and other uses.  We’re tired of wild horses getting the short end of the stick, and we just won’t stand for it.  No more “You have to go slow to go fast,” as Senior Consultant Dean Bolstad kept using as an excuse at the National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board meeting.

Many wild horse advocacy groups are going over the National Academy of Sciences report with a fine tooth comb, and we will give you, as well as CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND THE MEDIA, our assessments.

The heat is on, thanks to so many of YOU who have been making phone calls and writing letters.  Keep it up!

Lawmakers Press for Changes to Broken Wild Horse & Burro Program

Source: Multiple, written by Scott Sonner

“This is an untenable situation, both for America’s wild horses and for American taxpayers.”
Former Wild Horses at feeding time in private long term holding facility outside Oklahoma City ~ photo by Terry Fitch

Former Wild Horses at feeding time in private long term holding facility outside Oklahoma City ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

RENO — Thirty U.S. representatives urged new U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell on Thursday to make a priority out of reforming the government’s wild horse management program and its spiraling budget that they say has created an “untenable situation” for both the mustangs and taxpayers.

Arizona Rep. Raul Grijalva, the ranking Democrat on the House Natural Resources subcommittee on public lands and environmental regulation, wrote the letter appealing to Jewell “as a conservationist and outdoor enthusiast” to help bring “long overdue” changes at the U.S. Bureau of Land Management charged with protecting the horses.

“Given the importance of wild horses to the American people and considering the ever-tightening budget situation, we believe that this is a problem that demands your urgent attention,” he wrote.

Florida Rep. C.W. Young, a senior member of the House Appropriations Committee, was the lone Republican to sign the letter.

The majority of the co-signers were from states in the East and South, but several joined from states that are home to some of the estimated 37,000 free-roaming wild horses and burros on federal land in the West, including Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nev., Rep. Jared Polis, D-Colo., five representatives from California and three from Oregon.

Grijalva said they’re asking for renewed attention to the program after an independent scientific review of horse roundups. The review, which was released last month, recommended that the government invest in widespread fertility control of the mustangs and let nature cull any excess herds instead of spending millions to house them in overflowing holding pens.

The 14-member panel assembled by the National Science Academy’s National Research Council and Management concluded BLM’s removal of nearly 100,000 horses from the Western range over the past decade is probably having the opposite effect of its intention to ease ecological damage and reduce overpopulated herds.

By stepping in prematurely when food and water supplies remain adequate, BLM is producing artificial conditions that ultimately serve to perpetuate population growth, the committee stated.

BLM spokesman Tom Gorey referred inquiries Thursday to Jewell’s office where a spokeswoman said press secretary Jessica Kershaw was not immediately available to comment.

Grijalva said BLM’s wild horse budget has doubled since 2009 as the agency “escalated its unsustainable roundup-remove-and-stockpile approach to wild horse management.” Last year, BLM spent 60 percent of its wild horse budget on holding facilities alone, more than $40 million.

“In fact, the U.S. government today maintains more wild horses in captivity than remain in the wild,” Grijalva said. “This is an untenable situation, both for America’s wild horses and for American taxpayers.”

New Interior Secretary Sally Jewell Waiting for Study on Wild Horses?

Source: By Allison Sherry ~ The Denver Post

Mainstream Article, once again, skewed against wild horses and burros…
BLM Antelope attack in 2011 ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

BLM Antelope attack in 2011 ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

WASHINGTON — New Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said Tuesday that she is still undecided about how to handle a burgeoning? wild horse and burro population that is eating more than half the horse budget at the BLM and sparking outrage among wild horse advocates.

Jewell said in an interview with The Denver Post that she is awaiting a National Academy of Sciences study, slated to come out in early June (and directed by the BLM not to look at the millions of welfare cattle grazing on the same land), to determine how best to handle the horses.

“It’s going to help identify what’s the sustained capacity of our public lands to handle our wild horses, what is the effectiveness of things like birth control methodology to try and deal with the issue,” Jewell said Tuesday. “So we appreciate their help and we look forward to that response.” (How about the millions of private cattle?)…(CONTINUED)

Comments needed and rest of the story located (HERE)

Wild Horse Advocates Split Over Interior Nominee

By MARTIN GRIFFITH as it appears in the Idaho Statesman

“Her focus appears to be on making profits off public land
Twin Peaks Horses ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Twin Peaks Horses ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

RENO, Nev. — Wild-horse advocates may be unified in their sharp criticism of Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, but they’re split over President Barack Obama’s choice to replace him.

Horse groups are hoping Recreational Equipment Inc. chief Sally Jewell will represent a shift in direction for the government’s management of wild mustangs. They note nearly 40,000 horses have been removed from the range across the West during Salazar’s four-year tenure, which ends in March.

Suzanne Roy, director of the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, said her group “responded optimistically” to Jewell’s nomination and looks forward to opening a dialogue with her about reforming the U.S. Bureau of Land Management‘s wild horse program.

“Sally Jewell is a surprising choice, but we’re hopeful that as a conservationist and outdoor enthusiast, she’ll appreciate the important role wild horses play in our national heritage and work with us to find ways to preserve them for future generations,” Roy said. “Jewell will face many challenges as interior secretary, but time is running out for America’s wild horses and burros, so she’ll have to act quickly.”

In announcing the nomination Wednesday, Obama said Jewell has earned national recognition for her environmental stewardship at REI, which sells clothing and gear for outdoor enthusiasts. He also noted her experience as an engineer in oil fields and her fondness for mountain climbing, biking and skiing.

But Anne Novak, executive director of California-based Protect Mustangs, said she has doubts about Jewell because of her earlier background as a commercial banker and Mobil Oil engineer.

“I’m very concerned that an appointment coming from big oil and banking will not protect native wild horses,” Novak said. “They don’t know how to make money out of mustangs but see environmental restrictions slowing down quick profits … Her focus appears to be on making profits off public land.”

Click (HERE) to read the story in it’s entirety and to comment at the Statesman

The Man Who Could Save America’s Wild Horses

– Andrew Cohen is a contributing editor at The Atlantic and legal analyst for 60 Minutes. He is also chief analyst and legal editor for CBS Radio News and has won a Murrow Award as one of the nation’s leading legal analysts and commentators. More

Meet Raul Grijalva, a rumored potential nominee for Secretary of the Interior — and dedicated friend of the nation’s untamed herds.

Hope for Wild Horses and BurrosWhen Ken Salazar announced his resignation earlier this month as Secretary of the Interior, it set off quivers of speculation among wild horse advocates about who might replace him in the post most important to the fate of the nation’s vulnerable herds. Salazar, a longtime Colorado rancher, was never trusted by the wild horse community. Under his direction, the Bureau of Land Management has left the horses more exposed, literally and figuratively, than they’ve been in decades.

Very quickly, two main streams of thought emerged. Some horse activists worry that President Barack Obama will appoint Washington Governor Christine Gregoire to the post. The National Journal noted glowingly two weeks ago that as “a former head of Washington state’s Department of Ecology, Gregoire is steeped in experience in energy and environmental issues. Her enthusiastic support for renewable energy has won plaudits from environmentalists.”

But that’s not how wild horse and other wildlife advocates necessarily see her. In November, in a Wildlife News piece headlined “Governor Gregoire’s Troubling Livestock Legacy,” the lead paragraph offered another view of the potential nominee:

Washington Governor Christine Gregoire is rumored to be a front-runner for nomination as Secretary of the Interior, where she would oversee millions of acres of public land. But a livestock “pilot” program she instituted in Washington, which fast-tracked the introduction of livestock grazing on Washington Wildlife Areas free of charge to ranchers, while running roughshod over the concerns of agency wildlife biologists, should give wildlife advocates pause.

The other theme that quickly blossomed after Salazar’s resignation announcement was the notion that the best candidate to replace him is Representative Raul Grijalva, a Democrat who has represented Arizona’s 7th District in Congress since 2003. “He has been the most staunch supporter of wild horses in Congress for many years now,” said Carol Walker, a renowned wild horse photographer who closely tracks the herds. Meanwhile, the folks at the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, representing 50 such horse organizations, quickly launched an online petition to support Grijalva’s undeclared candidacy.

Right or wrong, he’s earned this support. Representative Grijalva has been a consistent friend to the herds, and a persistent critic of the way the BLM has handled them. In 2009, for example, he co-sponsored the “Restore Our American Mustangs Act,” which would have buttressed federal protection for the horses. The measure passed the House but died later that year without being put to a vote in the Senate. In 2011, Rep. Grijalva sent this letter to Salazar, urging the Secretary to halt the BLM’s “detrimental new policies” toward the horses.

So he stands up for the horses. He’s not afraid of the ranching and livestock lobbies, which have dominated the Interior Department for generations. He’s direct about his efforts to restore the balance Congress intended in 1971 when it passed the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, the landmark statute designed to protect America’s wild horse herds from precisely the sort of destruction that threatens them today. Oh, and he thinks the Obama Administration could be more transparent in its dealings on the issue. What’s not to love?

When it comes to these horses — the tens of thousands of them now in holding pens in the Midwest, many more now in captivity than roaming wild — whoever becomes the next Secretary of the Interior will likely have to deal with the fallout from an emerging story about potential federal involvement in the sale of wild horses for slaughter, an act that is prohibited by federal law. It was the unremitting slaughter of wild horses in the 1950s, you may remember, which prompted Velma Bronn Johnston, “Wild Horse Annie” herself, to push for the enactment of the first federal laws to protect the animals.

With all this in mind, I caught up with Grijalva Wednesday afternoon as he was traveling by car through the Arizona desert, from Tuscon to Yuma. What follows is an edited transcript of our phone conversation…(CONTINUED)

Click (HERE) to read Rep. Grijalva’s interview at The Atlantic and to Comment

President Obama: Appoint Raul Grijalva as U.S. Next Interior Secretary

Thanks to American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign for spearheading this effort.

A Champion For Our Public Lands. Protecting Our National Treasures. A Bold Leader.
(Click) Image to Sign Petition

(Click) Image to Sign Petition

For Secretary of Interior, the choice is clear. President Obama should appoint Rep. Raul Grijalva. He’s a bold leader and a champion of our public lands who will protect our natural treasures, including American wild horses and burros, for generations to come.

Dear President Obama,

Your choice for the next Secretary of the Interior will determine the future of our public lands and their natural resources, including wild horses and burros.The individual you appoint must reflect the ideals that you campaigned upon and that so many of us supported.

The person best qualified to represent these ideals and move the Interior Department forward is Rep. Raul Grijalva, Congressman from Arizona’s Third Congressional District.

Rep. Grijalva has spent his entire career standing up to special interests and for American taxpayers and the preservation of our natural resources. As the top Democrat on the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands since 2007, he has been an outspoken advocate for conservation. He has also been a leader in the fight to reform the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) costly and inhumane wild horse and burro program.

As Interior Secretary, Rep. Grijalva will hold the BLM accountable, and he will stop the government giveaway of public resources to commercial interests that exploit our public lands.

Please nominate Rep. Raul Grijalva as the 51st Secretary of the Interior. He is clearly the best choice to protect and preserve our public lands and our natural heritage, including America’s treasured wild horses and burros.

Sincerely,

Your Name

Click (HERE) to sign the Petition
Together, let’s seize this chance to bring real leadership to the Interior Department!

OPM Chief John Berry: The Next Interior Secretary?

by Lisa Rein of the Washington Post

“The president is under intense pressure from gay activists to appoint an openly gay secretary to his cabinet…”
(Astrid Riecken/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

(Astrid Riecken/FOR THE WASHINGTON POST)

Federal employees may know John Berry  as the face of the workforce in his role as director of the Office of Personnel Management.

Berry, 53, is now expected to be considered by the Obama administration to replace Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, who confirmed early Wednesday that he will leave his post in March and return to Colorado.

 Read our profile of Berry in last September’s Style section.

Interior secretaries generally hail from the West, and Berry, a Rockville native, does not. But the president is under intense pressure from gay activists to appoint an openly gay secretary to his cabinet, a historic move. And Berry fits the bill.

He also has experience, serving at Interior during the Clinton administration as Assistant Secretary for Policy, Management and Budget then moving to direct the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and the National Zoo during the second Bush administration. Obama tapped Berry to run OPM in 2009.

Berry told the Post in an e-mail Wednesday morning, “I stand ready to serve this President in whatever capacity that he feels helpful.”

His likely competition includes former Washington state governor Chris Gregoire (D), former congressman Norm Dicks (D-Wash), former North Dakota senator Byron Dorgan (D), former Wyoming Gov. Dave Freudenthal (D) and Deputy Interior Secretary David Hayes. A less likely contender is Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.).

Click (HERE) to visit the Post and to Comment