Devils Garden Wild Horses

Here is what they are NOT telling the public in the below news article…

The USFS discontinued all funding for long term holding for wild horses and burros a few years ago. During the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Management Advisory Board meeting in 2015 and again on April 14, 2016, Barry Imler, Forest Service Rangeland Management Specialist provided the USFS “new” flow chart for wild horses captured on USFS lands. The chart shows that all captured wild horses not returned to public lands or young ones not adopted after 3 attempts and all wild horses over the age of ten will be euthanized or sold without limitation (KB). They will not be going to any long term holding. I quote, USFS Modoc Forest Supervisor, Kimberly H Anderson, “Disposition of older animals will be as stated above, consistent with law regulations and policy. This may include, but would not be limited to, turning them back out to the range, adoption, placement in long-term facilities, or euthanization.” “Should animals be euthanized, the manner of euthanasia would be in the most humane manner possible. In a field setting, they may be euthanized through the use of firearms or drugs…”

*As I previously stated, USFS Imler said there is no longer funding for long-term holding.

More information:

https://rtfitchauthor.com/2013/10/19/advocate-alert-devils-garden-wild-horses-is-this-what-it-sounds-like/

USFS Wild Horse “Flow Chart”

chart-of-forest-service


Devil’s Garden wild horse gather continues”

  • Sep 29, 2016

ALTURAS – Gathering of Devil’s Garden Wild Horses so far this week has been successful. Approximately 45 horses were gathered Monday from Pit River Tribal lands near the southwest end of Goose Lake, and 48 Tuesday from private land where owners requested their removal. The horses were transported safely to the Willow Creek Ranch temporary holding facility, according to a Modoc National Forest report.

Nine members of the public viewed Monday’s helicopter gather operations by Cattoor Livestock Roundups from the Goose Lake Causeway and more joined them for a tour of the temporary holding facility.

On Tuesday, after the horses were counted and sorted by age and sex, members of the public were invited by contractor Sue Cattoor to view the horses from a closer vantage point. The group saw light and dark grays, red roans, bay roans, sorrels and blacks. Most horses were calm. If someone walked a little too close to the corral fence the wary stallions would turn to get away.

The gather from private and tribal lands where the forest has received requests to remove wild horses will continue through the rest of the week.

The Modoc National Forest is seeking commitments for adoption of wild horses older than 5 years of age. Gathered horses ages 6 and older will be held at the temporary holding facility at Willow Creek Ranch for public viewing and commitment for adoption. Public viewing of gathered horses is available from 3 to 5 p.m. at Willow Creek Ranch approximately 20 miles north from Hwy 299 on Crowder Flat Road (Forest Road 73).

Older horses with adoption commitments and all horses ages 5 and younger will be transported to the BLM’s Litchfield Wild Horse and Burro facility and adopted through their normal process.

Visit http://bit.ly/2aGcCsu or call 530-233-5811 for more information.

http://www.heraldandnews.com/news/local_news/devil-s-garden-wild-horse-gather-continues/article_1853a5ef-b3ab-531a-9d61-8ce7390040a5.html

Alto Wild Horse Herd Comes Home

by Dianne L Stallings, Ruidoso News

“My biggest advice to the community is that our stance is that these horses are wild,”

The Alto “wild” horse herd was delivered quietly back to Lincoln County Tuesday, ending a month’s battle between herd advocates and officials with the New Mexico Livestock Board.

A truck pulled into the Fort Stanton Road property with members of the Alto herd.(Photo: Courtesy/Teeatta Lippert)

A truck pulled into the Fort Stanton Road property with members of the Alto herd.(Photo: Courtesy/Teeatta Lippert)

The return of the horses to pens prepared on land owned by Shelley McAlister was arranged Monday, but advocates said the livestock board didn’t want a crowd waiting for the equines. They were told that the noise and commotion might upset the steeds, advocate Teeatta Lippert said.

“They called me 20 minutes before they got here and said I needed to get here, they were ready to pull into the driveway,” Lippert said.

McAlister said her notice wasn’t from board officials.

“Someone in Carrizozo saw the truck and asked if they were the horses going back to Alto,” she said. “They told a woman, who called me. We just happened to be here working on the security cameras and packing up the house.”

“I am really grateful for the way it worked out,” Lippert said. “Trying to sort them with people hollering or calling names or screaming would have made our job a lot harder and would have stressed them out.”

Unloading went swiftly over a 10 minute to 20-minute period, she said. None of the adult horses acted up, but some of the foals were frisky. The foals now are in pens with their mothers and one even began nursing immediately, she said.

“My biggest advice to the community is that our stance is that these horses are wild,” Lippert said. “They were born wild. They are wild, so we must keep our distance. If we brush them and pet them, and get them use to us, then our standing in court that they are wild goes out the window, because they are officially domesticated. And it would be inhumane at that point to release them back in the wild.”

The battle won’t really be over until a district judge decides whether the horses fall under a definition of wild or are estray livestock under the jurisdiction of the livestock board. Working under the latter assumption, board officials hauled away the 12 mares and foals after they were penned by a property owner as nuisances. The action spurred rallies and community meetings, as well as litigation by the Wild Horse Observers Association asking for a restraining order on the sale of the horses by the livestock board. The order was granted and while the court drama plays out, an agreement was reached to allow the horses to come back to Alto as the responsibility of nine volunteers. The horses must stay in isolation for 21 days and then, if the case remains undecided, could be transferred to larger secure pastures.

Lippert said she was impressed with how the community handled the issue in a peaceful manner.

“We achieved more than shootings and riots and bombings and fires,” she said. “And our children can see that a small town can make a difference. I was raised to have hope and that if you send it out there and you stand your ground and pray, it if it is meant to be, Jesus will answer you.”

But the executive director of the livestock board said not everyone exhibited stellar behavior. “I’d like to thank the staff of the New Mexico Livestock Board for their professionalism during this emotional issue,” William Bunce said Tuesday. “Their courtesy extended to others, while being maligned for holding to the letter of the law, is exemplary.  Chapter 77 of the livestock code as well as the applicable Lincoln County Ordinances spell out very clearly that a legal process must take place. Those who expect this agency to operate otherwise, will continue to be disappointed. The vulgarity, insults and accusations thrown at our employees via telephone, email and various social media venues is nothing short of reprehensible.  As this issue is currently in litigation, any further discussion should be limited to the legal counsels representing both sides.”

With Aspenfest parade scheduled for Saturday, Lippert and several others said they hope to celebrate the return of the horses with a banner.

http://www.ruidosonews.com/story/news/local/2016/09/27/alto-wild-horse-herd-comes-home/91188924/