Horse News

Feel Good Sunday II: ~ Horsing Around on Hawaii

“Simply sharing a fun clip of Terry and I on our last trip to the Hawaiian Islands.  Got to play with some ponies on the Big Island and have a lot of fun.  Nothing exotic, just good times which make for even better memories.  Love ya, Terry!” ~ R.T.


4 replies »

  1. Aloha guys…..next time you are on the big island…..give me a holler!…..i live on the Hamakua Coast!…..glad to see you had a fun time……summer in full swing now…..take care….thanks again for all you do…..golde 808.938.1122

    Views from my yard…🌈🏝💛

    On Sun, Jun 23, 2019, 7:24 AM Straight from the Horse’s Heart wrote:

    > R.T. Fitch posted: “”Simply sharing a fun clip of Terry and I on our last > trip to the Hawaiian Islands. Got to play with some ponies on the Big > Island and have a lot of fun. Nothing exotic, just good times which make > for even better memories. Love ya, Terry!” ~ R.T. ” >

    Like

  2. KINDRED SPIRITS

    George Helm was a Native Hawaiian musician, activist, and leader of the aloha ‘āina movement of the 1970s. Aloha ʻāina, or “love of land,” is fundamental to Hawaiian cultural identity and has inspired some of the most significant political, social, and artistic contributions in Hawaiʻi over the last 150 years.

    Born on Moloka‘i, Helm attended high school on O‘ahu before turning his attention toward the island of Kahoʻolawe, which had been under the control of the U.S. military since World War II for use as target practice, subjecting its shores to forever-altering blasts.

    The smallest of the eight major islands, Kahoʻolawe has a deep and sacred connection to the Native Hawaiian people. In the old days, it was known as Kanaloa, the name for the god of the ocean, and its historical significance in fishing and voyaging is well documented. Its westernmost tip was a common point of departure and gateway from Hawai‘i to Tahiti.

    Amidst the 1970s resurgence of pride and interest in Hawaiian culture and identity, Helm and others made numerous “illegal occupations” of the island to protest the bombings and intermittently stop the destruction

    Helm’s legacy is still perpetuated today through the Protect Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana, the Kaho‘olawe Island Reserve Commission, and the larger Aloha ‘Āina movement, all of which call for a rejuvenation of cultural practices, cleanup of ordnance, and restoration of native species on the island.

    Kaho‘olawe is important not only for Hawaiians but for indigenous peoples globally. It represents a prideful past, a shameful destruction, and a monumental victory.

    Like

Care to make a comment?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.