Wyoming Opinion Differs on Leaked BLM Talking Points and Expanding Energy Development

by as published on The Casper Star Tribune

“Let me make one thing clear: The Interior Department is in the energy business,”

English: Bureau of Land Management logo

English: Bureau of Land Management logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A leaked draft of a new priority list from the Bureau of Land Management recently put energy development front and center among the agency’s initiatives.

In Wyoming, where the BLM manages 17.5 million acres of public land, any changes in how the agency permits and leases land for drilling oil and gas, or digging coal, sparks debate between those seeking to do business and those who want to reserve more land for public use and conservation.

The five-point draft from the BLM lists a number of priorities for the agency, like promoting energy independence for the U.S. and developing habitat improvement projects. The majority of the bullet points concern fossil fuel development. They include streamlining the drilling application process, opening new lands for drilling and addressing a “backlog” of industry requests. E&E News obtained a copy of the document and reported on its contents April 10.

 A spokeswoman for BLM said the list reflects the multi-use responsibility of the BLM but emphasized that it is not a final draft.

“While these documents are still in draft form, these talking points are being assembled by the team at the BLM to clearly lay out our continued commitment to ensure opportunities for commercial, recreation and conservation activities on BLM-managed lands,” said spokeswoman Megan Crandall in a statement. “Our multiple-use and sustained yield mission for managing public lands on behalf of all Americans supports an all-of-the-above energy plan, shared conservation through tribal, state and local partnerships, public access for recreation and other activities and keeping America’s working public landscapes healthy and productive.”

Click (HERE) to read the rest of the story.

http://trib.com/business/energy/wyoming-opinion-differs-on-leaked-blm-talking-points-and-expanding/article_5105a15d-51f8-5e1b-8751-8624c707cc55.html

Public Comment Needed on Nevada Mine that will Use Over 2 Billion Gallons of Water in 10 Years (further threatening wild horses)

This map shows the Gold Bar Mine area, the approximate HMA (in solid red) and HA boundaries(in broken red lines), the approximate Mt. Hope Mine Project area and well field, and the approximate combined Gold Bar Mine and Mt. Hope Mine 10′ water drawdown area (in blue).  The 10′ water drawdown (in blue) effects almost the entire Roberts Mountain HMA.  The 1′ water drawdown will effect a much larger area.  (Streams can dry up with as little as a 1′ water drawdown.)

BE SURE TO LOOK AT ALL 8 MAPS AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS ARTICLE.

It’s best to write comments in your own words so that the BLM counts each comment as one, instead of counting a thousand similar comments/form letter as only one.  You can read the joint comments submitted by Wild Horse Freedom Federation and The Cloud Foundation below, and a quick summary on pages 5-41 of the DEIS HERE.  Comments are due by April 17, 2017.

Some suggested talking points are:

  1. Be sure to ask for the NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE.
  2. The Gold Bar mine project will use over 2 billion gallons of water in 10 years.  The BLM needs to take into consideration past (historic), current and likely future droughts and climate change when deciding if they will approve this DEIS.
  3. The Project will negatively impact the water, forage, safety, and “free-roaming” abilities of the Roberts Mountain wild horse herd on the Roberts Mountain HMA, as well as the nearby wild horse herds on Whistler Mountain and Fish Creek Herd Management Areas.
  4. The BLM is minimizing the area of impact by only indicating the 10′ water drawdown, and not the 5′ or 1′ water drawdown.  The 5′ and 1′ water drawdown will cover a much larger area of land.  A stream can dry up with as little as 1′ of water drawdown.
  5. When the nearby Mt. Hope mine becomes operational, it is proposed that it will use an additional 7,000 gallons per minute for the life of the mine (40-50 years).  Mt. Hope mine will use over 3 1/2 billion gallons of water per year and over 36 billion gallons of water in 10 years.
  6. The BLM refers to the Cyanide Management Plan (1992), (noted in Vol. 1A, 1.4.3) and the Solid Minerals Reclamation Handbook (1992), (noted in Vol. 1A, 1.4.4).  These are 25 years old and outdated.  Ask for updates of this Plan and Handbook for this DEIS.
  7. The area of Gold Bar Mine will be expanded by 40,000 acres or 62.5 square miles, creating more environmental degradation.

The DEIS is available online at HERE.   Interested individuals should address all written comments to Christine Gabriel, Project Manager, using any of the following ways:

Fax: (775) 635-4034

Email:  blm_nv_bmdo_mlfo_gold_bar_project_eis@blm.gov

Mail:  Bureau of Land Management

Mount Lewis Field Office

50 Bastian Road

Battle Mountain, NV 89820

Wild Horse Freedom Federation and The Cloud Foundation submitted these joint comments regarding the BLM’s Gold Bar Mine Project:

           

Bureau of Land Management

Mount Lewis Field Office

50 Bastian Road

Battle Mountain, NV 89820

Email: blm_NV_bmdo_mlfo_gold_bar_project_eis@ blm.gov

DATE:  April 5, 2017

Subject: DEIS MMI Gold Bar Mine Project

Dear Ms. Gabriel:

On behalf of The Cloud Foundation (TCF) and Wild Horse Freedom Federation (WHFF), 501(c)3 non-profit corporations, and our hundreds of thousands of supporters throughout the United States, we would like to thank you for the opportunity to submit scoping comments on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for McEwen Mining Inc.’s (MMI) Gold Bar Mine Project (Project).

TCF, a wild horse and burro advocacy group and an advocacy group for all wildlife on our public lands in the West, and Wild Horse Freedom Federation, a voice for the protection of wild horses and burros and public lands, strongly oppose the expansion of the Gold Bar mining project and we urge the NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE in this DEIS for the following reasons:

Wild Horse Herds To Be Affected:

The Project will negatively impact the Roberts Mountain Wild Horse Herd as well as the nearby herds of Whistler Mountain and Fish Creek Herd Management Areas.

Sage Grouse Habitat Affected:

Not only wild horses will be affected in this area. All wildlife will suffer.

Open pit mining is the most environmentally destructive type of mining anywhere. Extreme weather events can overwhelm all mandated precautions, threatening migratory birds and small mammals. In the case of a flood, even large mammals like wild horses risk exposure to potentially lethal mining waste.

Direct habitat damage due to mining plus further fragmentation by roads and large equipment traveling on these roads will eliminate hopes for the recovery of the Greater Sage Grouse in this area. The transport process in itself is dangerous—accidents, dust, spread of contaminants, noise, etc.

Greater Sage Grouse were once so numerous that the “sky was black” with these large birds, according to Ginger Kathrens’ late Uncle, Allan Ralston, who spoke of this area after his return from WWII. Now the birds are threatened and a species of critical environmental concern. BLM should prioritize these risks.

Impacts on Water Sources:

Per the Gold Bar DEIS, page 4-147, under 2 different scenarios, the mine will either pump 380 gpm (gallons per minute) or 500 gpm (gallons per minute).

If the mine pumps 380 gpm, this equals 22,800 gallons per hour, 547,200 gallons per day, and 199,728,000 gallons per year.  Over 10 years, it will pump over 2 billion gallons of water.

If the mine pumps 500 gpm, this equals 30,000 gallons per hour, 720,000 gallons per day, and 262,800,000 gallons per year.  Over 10 years, it will pump over 2 1/2 billion gallons of water.

This does not include the water which the Mt. Hope mine will use once mining begins.  Mt. Hope is projected to use 7,000 gallons per minute for the life of the mine (40-50 years).

The project will deplete surface and ground water resulting in the drying up of ephemeral streams. Reducing water tables to dangerously low levels will negatively impact perennial streams. This DEIS minimizes the impact on water resources by not providing 5’ or 1’ water drawdown maps and thus minimizing the additional area of land that will be effected.  A stream can dry up with as little as 1’ of water drawdown.

Maps created by Wild Horse Freedom Federation are included in the Appendix.

Map 1 – (Figure 4.23-11 of DEIS) Gold Bar Mine Wild Horse CESA (Cumulative Effects Study Area).  On page 4-265 of the DEIS, it states “The CESA for the wild horses and burros includes Roberts Mountain, Whistler Mountain, and portions of the Fish Creek HMAs, as well as Kobeh Valley and Roberts Mountain HAs where wild horses existed based on past inventories, and where they could be potentially affected by the Project…”

Map 2 – shows the addition of the approximate 10′ water drawdown area – (Figure 4.19-3 of Gold Bar Mine Project), 500 gpm (gallons per minute) for 10 years.

Map 3 – shows the addition of the approximate HMA and HA boundaries.

Map 4 – shows the addition of the approximate Mt. Hope Mine Project area and well field – (Figure 3.13.1 Mt. Hope Project EIS).

Map 5 – shows the addition of the approximate Mt. Hope Mine 10″ water drawdown area – (Figure 3.2.18 Mt Hope Project EIS).

Map 6 – shows approximate sketch of Gold Bar Mine and Mt Hope Mine with HMA and HA boundaries

Map 7 – shows approximate HMA boundaries over grazing allotments map – (Figure 3.7 – 1, Gold Bar Mine EIS)

Map 8 – shows approximate mining, water drawdown, and grazing with the HMA and HA boundaries.

BLM writes in their description of the Roberts Mountain HMA: Water availability is a key influence to wild horse use during summer months. Wild horses will generally travel much farther to water than will livestock. In many HMAs water sources are plentiful and supplied by perennial streams, springs, and human constructed water developments such as livestock water tanks and ponds. In other cases, water sources are limiting, and in drought years, wild horses may have difficulty accessing sufficient water, (emphasis added) especially if the population exceeds the Appropriate Management Level (AML). In these cases, wild horse distribution is closely tied to the location of the available waters, which becomes very important to the health of the herd.

Drought Ridden Region

Drought is common in this driest state in the Union. Emergency removals of wild horses because of the lack of water are common. Removals of 14 wild horse herds occurred in 2009 south of Ely by BLM. The Agency cited the lack of reliable water sources as the reason for the removal of wild horses on 1.4 million acres of public land.

The proposed expansion and creation of more water dependent, extractive uses of the land is irresponsible.

Outdated Plan and Manual

This DEIS is based, in part, on a plan and a manual that are each about 25 years old and outdated.  We are referring to the BLM Cyanide Management Plan (1992), (noted in Vol. 1A, 1.4.3) and the Solid Minerals Reclamation Handbook (1992), (noted in Vol. 1A, 1.4.4).  We ask that you review these outdated materials and update them if you are going to base any part of this DEIS on these outdated plans.

Economic Uncertainty

The potential for failure of this project is so high that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) states: . . .in addition to greater uncertainty as to the economic feasibility of Mineralized Material compared to proven and probable reserves, there is also greater uncertainty as to the existence of Mineralized Material. U.S. investors are cautioned not to assume that measured or indicated resources will be converted into economically mineable reserves. The estimation of inferred resources involves far greater uncertainty as to their existence and economic viability than the estimation of other categories of resources.

Couple the above with the failure of the previous mine developers, Atlas Corporation, who filed for bankruptcy and abandoned the land in an unreclaimed condition in 1999.

Wide Scale Damage

McEwen Mining, a Canadian Mining company, is poised to take over and create even more environmental degradation. The area would be expanded by 40,000 acres or 62.5 square miles, or about 1/3 the size of the Colorado Springs metropolitan area where TCF is headquartered. In other words, this is destruction on a grand scale.

Damage from gold mining is permanent. No amount of mitigation can return the landscape to anything approaching a natural state. Over flights of the area reveal large-scale destruction. Increasing this permanent destruction for the hope of short-term gain is not a reasonable, and certainly not an environmentally friendly decision.

For the above reasons, we urge you to select the NO ACTION ALTERNATIVE for the Gold Bar Mine Project.

Thanks very much for your consideration of our position on this important issue.

Sincerely,

          

Ginger Kathrens                             Debbie Coffey

Executive Director,                         Vice-President,

The Cloud Foundation, Inc.          Wild Horse Freedom Federation

107 S. 7th Street                                P.O. Box 390

Colorado Springs, CO 80905        Pinehurst, TX  77362

MAPS:

Map 1

http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gold-Bar-Mine-Map-1.pdf

Map 2

http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gold-Bar-Mine-Map-2.pdf

Map 3

http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gold-Bar-Mine-Map-3.pdf

Map 4

http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gold-Bar-Mine-Map-4.pdf

Map 5

http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gold-Bar-Mine-Map-5.pdf

Map 6

http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gold-Bar-Mine-Map-6.pdf

Map 7

http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gold-Bar-Mine-Map-7.pdf

Map 8

http://wildhorsefreedomfederation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Gold-Bar-Mine-Map-8-with-mining-water-drawdown-and-grazing.pdf

One of BLM’s favored “uses” on public lands threatens water

While removing wild horses and burros from public lands at a breakneck pace, the BLM is expanding other “multiple uses” of our public lands that threaten water and the environment, including mining.  –  Debbie

BinghamCanyon-landslide-april2013-Deseret

Massive landslide at the Bingham Canyon mine in Utah.  Photo: Deseret News

SOURCE:  Earthworks

PUBLICATION DATE: September 8, 2015
MINING INDUSTRY EXPLOITS CLEAN WATER ACT LOOPHOLES

The metals mining industry is the single largest source of toxic waste and one of the most environmentally destructive industries in the country.  Today’s massive mining operations involve blasting, excavating, and crushing many thousands of acres of land and treating the ore with huge quantities of toxic chemicals such as cyanide and sulfuric acid.

The mines that produce our gold, silver, copper, and uranium notoriously pollute adjacent streams, lakes, and groundwater with toxic by-products.  In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that 40% of the watersheds in the western United States are contaminated from hardrock mines.  Toxic spills and acid mine drainage kill aquatic life, poison community drinking water, and pose serious health risks.

Record metal prices coupled with new technologies allow the mining industry to exploit places—and at a scale—that would not have been feasible in the past.  For example, the Pebble Partnership is proposing to build North America’s largest copper and gold mine in the remote headwaters of Alaska’s Bristol Bay, the source of the greatest runs of sockeye salmon left on earth.

Adding insult to injury, the American public receives very little in exchange for the use and destruction of the public lands where many hardrock mines are located.  Most mines are owned by foreign corporations and, unlike other extractive industries, the hardrock mining industry does not pay royalties for minerals taken from federal public lands.  What’s more, taxpayers are generally on the hook for the clean- up of abandoned mines.  EPA estimates that the half million abandoned mines across the country could cost as much as $50 billion to clean up.

Loopholes in the Clean Water Act Allow Hardrock Mines to Poison Our Waters

While there is not a single solution to the problems posed by hardrock mining, one obvious step is to prevent mines from dumping their toxic wastes into our lakes, rivers, and wetlands. Hardrock mines produce millions, sometimes billions of tons of waste. The production of one gold ring produces 20 tons of mine waste. Mine waste and tailings frequently contain toxic chemicals such as arsenic, cadmium, and lead. Unfortunately, it has become a common industry practice for mines to use our lakes, streams, and other waters as cheap toxic waste dumps.
In theory, the Clean Water Act (CWA) should stop this destructive practice. One of the primary goals of the act was to stop the use of the nation’s waters as disposal sites for industrial wastes. The problem is there are two loopholes in the CWA that allow many hardrock and surface coal mines to treat the nearest river valley or lake as a waste dump for massive quantities of tailings and overburden. Mines that have exploited these loopholes have had devastating impacts on local communities, fish, and wildlife populations — effects often felt for decades.
1. The first loophole is found in EPA and Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) regulations
that state that Clean Water Act protections do not apply to what the Corps calls “waste treatment systems.” This exclusion allows
mine developers to build a dam across the mouth of a valley and dump their wastes into the waters
behind the dam because these waters have become part of a “waste treatment system” and are no longer considered
to be a river, lake, or wetland deserving of protection. This legal fiction — that waters impounded by mine developers are no longer waters — defeats the very purpose and spirit of the CWA.
 
2. The second loophole resulted from a 2002 revision of regulations that changed the meaning of the word “fill” under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. Section 404 was intended to regulate the disposal of wood chips, soil, plastics, clay, sand, or related materials normally associated with dredging and construction – related activities. Now, EPA and the Corps treat the discharge of tailings from hardrock mines and overburden
from coal mines as fill. The effect of this change is that hazardous contaminants from mine waste are treated the same as relatively innocuous organic building materials.
READ THE REST HERE.

How the deck is stacked against wild horses & burros

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) streamlines “uses” like mining that use huge amounts of water (while there is a drought in the West), yet cites the need to remove wild horses and burros to maintain a “thriving ecological balance.”  Just one mine in Nevada, Barrick Gold’s Goldstrike mine, has pumped over 383 BILLION gallons of water from an aquifer.   It seems that the BLM FAVORS “USES” THAT GENERATE MORE MONEY, which is in violation of the Federal Lands Management Planning Act (FLPMA).

To learn more, read “The Mining of our Aquifers” and “Neil Kornze, A BLM Gift to the Mining Industry”.  You can read more about the Pan Mine Project, that Kornze refers to in the article below, HERE.  –  Debbie

5550dd0a15be2.image  Neil Kornze (photo:  Dylan Woolf Harris, Elko Daily Free Press)

BLM aims to lower mine permitting timeline

SOURCE:  Elko Daily Free Press

ELKO – From the planning stages to production, the time for a mine to be up and running can feel like a long wait – but it’s not as long as it used to be.

Bureau of Land Management Director Neil Kornze, who comes from a mining family and spent most of his childhood and teenage years in northeastern Nevada’s mining community, said the agency is actively working to cut down on the permitting process for mines on federal land.

“We’re requesting (from mining companies) more information up front, which allows us to be more timely in the processing of the application,” he said during a May stop in Elko.

Kornze cited the Pan Mine in White Pine County as a notable example. Exploration in 2011 led to an operating plan. The scoping period began in early 2012, and the record of decision was signed in December of 2013.

A few other projects were also permitted within about three years, he added.

“The prior standard used to be more like 10 years,” he said. “I think we’re pretty pleased with the big step forward on that.”

The long process has been criticized in the past by county officials.

“We’re very proud that mining continues to be a key driver of the economy here in Northern Nevada,” he said.

The plans for Midway Gold U.S. Inc.’s Pan operation called for main north and south pits. The BLM also approved three satellite pits, a heap leach pad, three rock disposal sites and a transmission line, altogether adding up to 3,301 acres of surface disturbance.

Kornze became BLM chief in December 2013.

At his confirmation hearing, Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., remarked on Kornze’s link to mining country.

“Neil Kornze is somebody that is just perfect for the job, raised in rural Nevada, Elko County,” he said. “Nevada has 17 counties. But in the northeastern part of the state is a large county that is really a remarkably beautiful place. It now has more mining in it than any place in America. The State of Nevada produced about 6 million ounces of gold last year, and much of it came from Elko County.”

 

BLM approves Pan Mine Project west of Ely

This mine is in the Pancake Herd Management Area in Nevada, a federally protected area designated PRIMARILY for wild horses. – Debbie Coffey

SOURCE:  Elko Daily Free Press

The project is located in the Pancake Mountain Range in White Pine County, about 50 miles west of Ely and 22 miles southeast of Eureka.

The decision allows the mining operator to construct and operate a new heap leach gold mine that would consist of two primary open pits, three satellite pits, one heap leach pad, three rock disposal areas and a transmission line.  The total surface disturbance would be approximately 3,301 acres, according to the agency.

The BLM selected the Southwest Power Line and Waste Rock Disposal Site Design  alternatives with applicant-committed environmental protection measures and mitigation measures specified in the final environmental impact statement. The Southwest Power Line Alternative was developed to avoid potential impacts to greater sage grouse from the proposed action power line.  The Waste Rock Disposal Site Design alternative would involve a conventional waste rock disposal design and move waste rock away from more important greater sage grouse habitat in order to minimize impacts.

The notice of availability for the Pan Mine Project final EIS was published in the Federal Register on Nov. 20 initiating a minimum 30-day public availability period.  The FEIS is available online.  Go to http://www.blm.gov/nv/  and click on the Ely District.

This decision may be appealed to the Interior Board of Land Appeals , U. S. Department of the Interior Office of Hearing and Appeals in accordance with the regulations contained in 43 CFR, Part 4.

For information, contact Miles Kreidler, BLM Ely District mining engineer, at 775-289-1893 or mkreidler@blm.gov.

BLM Digs Deeper Into Man-Made Drought

SOURCE:  PPJ Gazette

By Debbie Coffey    Copyright 2013        All Rights Reserved.

During a proclaimed drought across much of the West, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in the Ely District of Nevada is offering up 399,873 acres of public lands for oil & gas lease sales.

This is being done even though “Fracking requires enormous quantities of water.  Estimates put water usage at between 3 and 5 million gallons per fracking of a single well, and each well can be fracked several times.”

The BLM issued an Environmental Assessment (EA) to lease these 399,873 acres June 28, 2013, only a month after issuing an EA to remove wild horses because “there is insufficient vegetation or water to maintain the wild horses’ health and well being.”

If there isn’t enough water for wild horses, how can there possibly be enough water for oil & gas exploration and development? Where is the water going to come from?

The map below shows the oil & gas lease sale parcel areas in red, and some of the wild horse Herd Management Areas (HMAs), including Triple B (Buck-Bald & Butte), Antelope, Maverick-Medicine and Antelope Valley (which includes the Dolly Varden Range).

Scan_Pic0079

Now, take a look at these same HMAs below, with the red oil & gas lease sale area, including some of the groundwater basins in blue.

Scan_Pic0080

(Even though the red area may look small, there is a potential for a water drawdown and risk of water contamination over the area of the entire groundwater basin.  And, there is inter-flow between basins.)

The map below shows a Grazing Allotment map, along with an outline of the wild horse HMAs and the oil & gas lease areas in red.

Scan_Pic0082

Scientific American published an article regarding fracking wastewater wells, stating “Over the past several decades, U.S. industries have injected more than 30 trillion gallons of toxic liquid deep into the earth, using broad expanses of the nation’s geology as an invisible dumping ground.”

Many ranchers have been pushing for the removal of wild horses, seeing them as competition to their grazing interests.  In reality, the ranchers’ biggest competition is, and will be, from water guzzling uses like oil & gas extraction and mining.  If there is less water, there is less forage.

Even during the drought, the BLM is approving the expansion of existing mines and the opening of new mines.

Just one mine in Nevada (Barrick Gold’s Goldstrike Mine) has pumped over 383 BILLION gallons of water from an aquifer. Nearly 10 million gallons of water a day is draining away from the driest state in the nation. (Kirk Johnson, New York Times).

Mining drops the water table and dries up streams and seeps.

In 2010, the BLM gave the green light to the expansion of the Bald Mountain Mine within the Triple B Herd Management Area (HMA), even knowing the mine caused mercury in the watershed and higher levels of arsenic in the surface water.

The U.S. is still using the General Mining Law of 1872.   Senator Harry Reid has been “instrumental in blocking efforts to reform the archaic General Mining Law of 1872, a legal blank check” that “allowed miners to take an estimated $408 billion worth of gold and other hard rock minerals from public lands without paying a single cent in royalties…”

“Before Congress banned the practice in 1994, Toronto-based Barrick Gold paid just $9,765 for 1,950 acres in Nevada that held an estimated $10 billion in gold.”

To make one gold wedding band, about 20 tons of earth must be excavated.  Yet, when the BLM issues an EA to roundup wild horses, they show photos like the one below of the supposed “severe use” of the land by wild horses.

Scan_Pic0083

Do you think the BLM ever shows photos of a quarter or a pen next to a big mining pit or next to an oil derrick?

The reason the wild horses are facing dehydration and death right now is because of a man-made drought, caused by the BLM’s mismanagement of public lands.   Uses that make the most money are being fast tracked, no matter what the consequences, even though this is a blatant violation of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act.

“Scientists warned that as the Great Basin’s groundwater is drained, desert springs and seeps will dry up, farms and ranches will wither away, and plants and wildlife will die off.   The aquifer, which took millennia to fill, will run out.”

Soon, there won’t be wild horses left on public lands.  There also won’t be farming, ranching, hunting or fishing.  There just won’t be enough water. This is the “Industrialization of the West.”  Unless you do what you can to stop it.

Send your comments on the proposed lease sale by July 29, 2013 to the Ely District Office, by email to blm_nv_eydo_dec2013ogsale@blm.gov

The Environmental Assessment for the upcoming Dec. 2013 oil & gas lease sale: https://www.blm.gov/epl-front-office/projects/nepa/36744/43653/46903/PRELIM_EA_-_EYDO_Oil_&_Gas_Lease_Sale_Dec._2013.pdf

To Learn More:

“Is Fracking Behind Contamination of Wyoming Groundwater?” http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=is-fracking-behind-contamination-in-wyoming-groundwater

“The BLM Overlooks Arsenic & Mercury, but Gets Rid of Wild Horses” https://rtfitchauthor.com/2012/06/28/blm-overlooks-arsenic-mercury-but-gets-rid-of-wild-horses/

“The Mining of our Aquifers” http://ppjg.me/2010/07/28/the-mining-of-our-aquifers/

“Chinese Government Money is Buying on of USA’s Biggest Mines” http://ppjg.me/2010/12/07/chinese-government-money-is-buying-one-of-u-s-a-%E2%80%99s-biggest-mines/

“Senator Reid is Working Hard, but for Whom?” http://www.libertynewsonline.com/article_301_29167.php

SOURCES:

http://ecowatch.com/2013/record-drought-frackers-outcompete-farmers-water/

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=are-fracking-wastewater-wells-poisoning-ground-beneath-our-feeth&WT.mc_id=SA_emailfriend

“Harry Reid, Gold Member: Is Our Senator in bed with America’s worst polluter?” by Josh Harkinson (2/24/09) Mother Jones http://motherjones.com/environment/2009/02/harry-reid-gold-member

New York Times “Drier, Tainted Nevada May Be Legacy of Gold Rush” by Kirk Johnson (12/30/05) http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/30/national/30gold.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

http://www.blm.gov/pgdata/etc/medialib/blm/nv/field_offices/elko_field_office/information/nepa/eas/triple_b_water_haul.Par.93691.File.dat/Three_HMA_EA.pdf

https://www.blm.gov/epl-front-office/projects/nepa/36744/43653/46903/PRELIM_EA_-_EYDO_Oil_&_Gas_Lease_Sale_Dec._2013.pdf