Oregon’s Kiger and Riddle Mountain Wild Horse Capture – Yesterday One Mare With Broken Neck on the First Day of BLM Capture

kigermustang

Kiger Mustang from the Burns, Oregon area

by Grandma Gregg

“A four year old mare broke her neck and died after running into a panel while sorting at the capture site on September 1, 2015.”

Per the BLM website:
One page says they captured 101 wild horses and their other page says they captured 91.  We know BLM can’t count but after only one day they have already “misplaced” ten of our wild horses and killed one mare?

On http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/whb/kiger2015.php  BLM states this:

Details of Gather

Our overall goal is for the range to achieve or maintain a thriving natural ecological balance.

CUMULATIVE GATHER STATS, BEGINNING AUGUST 31, 2015
Total horses gathered: 101
Foals 23
Mares 48
Stallions 30
Total Deaths: 1 (gather related)*
*A 4 year old mare broke her neck and died after running into a panel while sorting at the capture site on September 1, 2015.

 

THEN, on  http://www.blm.gov/or/resources/whb/kiger2015reports.php,  BLM stated this:

Kiger Wild Horse Gather Reports

Cumulative totals can be found on the Kiger Wild Horse Gather home page.

Click to open/close Date: 09/01/2015

91 Animals Gathered
33 Animals Shipped
1 Animal Death (gather related): a 4 year old mare broke her neck and died after running into a fence panel while sorting at the capture site.
0 Animal Deaths (non-gather related): NONE
________________________________________________________________________________

The Kiger and Riddle Mountain Herd Management Areas are about 50 miles south of Burns, Oregon, and are bordered by Kiger Gorge on the west and East Steens Road on the east. The Appropriate Management Level (AML) herd sizes are non-viable populations of 33 to 56 horses for the Riddle HMA and 51 to 82 horses for the Kiger HMA.

Using BLM’s herd stats, the Riddle herd population jumped up 42% from 2014 to 2015 and the Kiger herd population jumped up 78% from 2014 to 2015.  This is impossible of course, but this is how the BLM fabricates the numbers to get funding for capture/removals of our wild horses.

If private/corporate invasive, domestic livestock were removed from the Riddle and the Kiger legal herd area, a total of about 6265 AUMs would be provide enough forage for approximately 203 more wild horses on the Kiger HMA and approximately 318 more wild horses on the Riddle HMA – year round.

Utah BLM proposes sterilization of wild stallions; experimentation under the guise of “research”

Utah BLM proposes sterilizing stallions on the Frisco HMA (managed by Cedar City Field Office) and the Conger HMA (managed by Fillmore Field Office), supposedly so they can find out the “impacts of sterilizing a portion of male horses in the population and how treatment impacts their behavior and ecology.”  According to a 2013 BLM Comparison of Population Growth Suppression Methods document, the BLM knows that there are unknown behavioral effects, but needs to do these “field studies” so they won’t get sued in their pursuit of non-reproducing or minimally reproducing herds.   According to BLM 2015 statistics, the Frisco HMA has an AML of only 12-60, and BLM estimates there are 146 horses (last population survey April 2012).  The Conger HMA has an AML of 40-80, and BLM estimates there are 156 horses (last population survey March 2011).  These herds are barely viable.  And, just a thought to keep in mind, 44 years after being mandated to protect wild horses and burros, the BLM is still trying to figure out how to count them correctly.  –  Debbie

istock-000018215018-xxxlarge

The BLM will work collaboratively with the United States Geological Survey to conduct several studies on wild horses and burros.

BLM Utah Proposes Wild Horse and Burro Research Projects

SOURCE: thehorse.com

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Utah’s Wild Horse and Burro Program will be working collaboratively with scientists at the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center to conduct several wild horse and burro research projects.

The research is being done partly in response to the 2013 National Academies of Science (NAS) report that recommended science-based management of free-roaming equids within the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program.

The NAS report recommended acquiring population ecology information on wild burros to better understand their demographic parameters and improve their management, since there is remarkably little published literature on wild burros. Two research proposals include the Sinbad wild burro herd management area (HMA) managed by the Price Field Office. The first study, which has been approved, would test population survey techniques for burros and identify and develop new techniques that can be applied across wild burro ranges of western rangelands. The second proposed study would study the demography of free-roaming burros to provide data for population modeling, to improve management of wild burros, and to contribute to a better understanding of the ecology of wild burros.

The NAS report also recommended research be done on wild horse demography and ecology, and highlighted the utility of statistical models for improved management. Studies to support this approach are being proposed for the Frisco HMA (managed by Cedar City Field Office) and the Conger HMA (managed by Fillmore Field Office). Specific questions approved in the research for the Conger HMA include quantifying the impacts of sterilizing a portion of male horses in the population and how treatment impacts their behavior and ecology.

Research on both wild horse and wild burro HMAs could include looking at the fertility, fecundity (reproductive rate), recruitment rate, age-specific survival and mortality, habitat selection, movements, habitat range; and the animals’ behavior and ecology at the scale of both the individual and population levels. The BLM expects these studies to support and contribute to the management of wild horses and burros.

The Price, Cedar City, and Fillmore Field Offices have begun initiating the National Environmental Policy Act analysis of the research proposals. The public review and scoping period for these proposals are anticipated to begin early in the fall of 2015.

For more information on upcoming USGS wild horse and burro studies, visit www.fort.usgs.gov/wildhorsepopulations.

BLM’s National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board Meeting Sept. 2-3: Will the public EVER get the report on the investigation into Tom Davis?

 

The meeting will be live-streamed at http://www.blm.gov/live/.

This meeting will be about BLM’s plans for STERILIZATION and CREATING MINIMALLY REPRODUCING HERDS of the already mostly non-viable remaining herds of wild horses & burros. 

It has been OVER 3 YEARS since the public became aware that Tom Davis bought over 1,700 wild horses.  When are we going to get a report on the BLM’s investigation into this?   Tim Harvey is the only member of the Advisory Board who continually asks for the report on the investigation into Tom Davis at these national meetings.   Thank you for following up on this, Tim.

dp_tom_davis_630x420_121110Tom Davis  (photo: Dave Philipps)

Did you ever wonder why these national advisory board meetings aren’t videotaped by the BLM and put on permanent record for the public on the BLM Wild Horse & Burro website?   (The public can’t see the BLM’s presentations on the meeting notes.  Since this meeting is held on workdays, many people will not be able to watch the live stream.)


The BLM National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board meets Sept. 2-3, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at the the Sheraton Oklahoma City Downtown Hotel.

Sept. 2 from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.  CENTRAL TIME

Sept. 3 from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.  CENTRAL TIME

The meeting will be live-streamed at http://www.blm.gov/live/.

AGENDA

Wednesday, September 2, 2015 (1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. ,Central Time)

1:00 p.m.—Welcome, Introductions, and Agenda Review

1:50 p.m.—Approval of April 2015 Minutes

2:10 p.m.—BLM Response to Advisory Board Recommendations

2:30 p.m.—Wild Horse and Burro Program Update

5:00 p.m.—Adjourn

Thursday, September 3, 2015 (8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Central Time)

8:00 a.m.—Program Update continued

10:30 a.m.—Public Comment Period Begins

12:00 p.m.—Public Comment Period Ends

12:05 p.m.—Lunch

1:15 p.m.—Working Group Reports

2:45 p.m.—Advisory Board Discussion and Recommendations to the BLM

5:00 p.m.—Adjourn

Public comment is on Sept. 3, 10:30 a.m. – noon CENTRAL TIME.

People who want to comment at Thursday’s meeting should register in person with the BLM by 10:15 a.m. CENTRAL TIME, that day at the meeting site.

People who want to submit a written comment can email the BLM at whbadvisoryboard@blm.gov  (include “Advisory Board Comment” in the email’s subject line) or mail a written comment to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, WO-260, Attention: Ramona DeLorme, 1340 Financial Boulevard, Reno, Nevada, 89502-7147.

 

 

Wild Horse Freedom Federation Joins Fight to Save Historic Wild Horse Herd from Extinction, Again

Wild-Horse-Freedom-FederationPO Box 390, Pinehurst Texas 77362

For Immediate Release: August 24, 2015

Wild Horse Freedom Federation Partners with The Cloud Foundation to Block BLM’s Plan to Zero Out Colorado’s Unique West Douglas Herd

Pinehurst, TX – Since 2010 wild equine advocacy groups Wild Horse Freedom Federation (WHFF) and The Cloud Foundation (TCF) have consistently worked together in a unified effort to thwart the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) attempts to totally remove Colorado’s West Douglas herd from their rightful range for the exclusive benefit of “Welfare” ranchers and special interest groups.

Although this legal battle has been ongoing for almost 20 years the BLM has, as of late, accelerated their efforts to destroy this federally protected, historic herd so that private cattle owners and extraction interests can declare the public land to be their own.

Citing that the wild horses are damaging the range due to over grazing the BLM has failed to acknowledge that the number of horses pale compared to the sizable herd of private, “welfare” cattle that are allowed to graze on the public land for the bulk of the year at mere pennies a day.

“Using the BLM’s own statistics, the wild horses are out numbered by a minimum of 4 to 1 by the welfare cattle allowed to graze on the horse’s range.” states R.T. Fitch, President and cofounder of WHFF, “The concept of the Federal Government destroying this herd to line the pockets of a few of their bedfellows ought to spark outrage in each and every American’s heart and soul. Enough is enough and we are making a stand.”

Renowned equine photographer and Director of Field Documentation for WHFF, Carol Walker agrees; “The BLM must not be allowed to zero out this herd simply because it is ‘inconvenient’ to manage, or because it is pandering to cattle ranchers and extraction companies. This would set a very damaging precedent for our few remaining wild horses and burros.”

The BLM intends to commence with their removal operation next month.

Links of interest:

History of WHFF’s legal Battle with BLM for West Douglas Horses
http://rtfitchauthor.com/?s=West+Douglas&submit=Search

BLM Press Release
http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/co/field_offices/white_river_field/wild_horse_documents.Par.18152.File.dat/Press%20Release%20WRFO%20Gather%207.29.15.pdf

West Douglas Herd Area Final EA
http://www.blm.gov/style/medialib/blm/co/field_offices/white_river_field/wild_horse_documents.Par.92698.File.dat/Final%20EA%20WDHA%2020150023_7.27.15_withappendices.pdf

Wild Horse Freedom Federation
http://www.wildhorsefreedomfederation.org

Contact:

R.T. Fitch
Wild Horse Freedom Federation
1-800-974-3684

Wild Horse Freedom Federation (WHFF) is a registered, Texas non-profit corporation with 501c(3) status in all 50 states. WHFF puts people between America’s wild equids and extinction through targeted litigation against governmental agencies whose documented agendas include the eradication of wild horse and burros from public, federal and state lands. WHFF is funded exclusively through the generosity of the American public.

BLM to round up wild burros from Bullfrog HMA

When bait trapping is done, there is almost NO PUBLIC, INDEPENDENT ACCOUNTABILITY.   –  Debbie

SOURCE:  thehorse.com

burro-crossing-sign

The BLM says gather is needed to remove excess burros to help decrease or eliminate public safety concerns for the citizens of Beatty and travelers along the Highway 95 corridor, among other reasons.  (Photo: iStock)

BLM to Gather Wild Burros from Bullfrog HMA

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is scheduled to begin gathering and removing approximately 40 wild burros from the Bullfrog herd management area (HMA), located near Beatty, Nevada, on Sept. 1. The gather will be conducted through a bait-trap and is expected to continue for about three weeks.

The BLM estimates there are approximately 243 wild burros within the HMA, and the post-gather population would be estimated at approximately 203 wild burros. The appropriate management level for the Bullfrog HMA is 58 to 91 wild burros.

The BLM says gather is needed to remove excess burros to help prevent deterioration of the range, achieve and maintain a thriving natural ecological balance, achieve and maintain healthy and viable wild burro populations, protect habitat for threatened desert tortoise and sensitive Amargosa toad, and decrease or eliminate public safety concerns for the citizens of Beatty and travelers along the Highway 95 corridor.

The Battle Mountain District’s Tonopah Field Office issued the decision record for the environmental assessment for the Bullfrog HMA gather plan in 2012. The environmental assessment and associated decision specifically allotted for follow-up bait and water trap gathers of the Bullfrog HMA to attain appropriate management level. The environmental assessment, decision record, associated documents, maps, and other information about the Bullfrog HMA is posted on the BLM Battle Mountain website at http://on.doi.gov/1J13Cbk.

The BLM contractor will gather the wild burros utilizing a bait-trapping method and transport the animals to the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Off-Range Corral in Axtell, Utah. The BLM will provide updates and information on a bi-weekly basis throughout the course of the gather at http://on.doi.gov/1J13Cbk.

For more information, please call David Price, wild horse and burro specialist at the Tonopah Field Office, at 775/482-7800.

Wild Horses vs Cattle

Giant BLM Bovine Mowing Machine ~ photo by Terry Fitch

Giant BLM Bovine Mowing Machine ~ photo by Terry Fitch

SOURCEThe Desert Independent

Editorial By Robert Winkler
Publisher of The Desert Independent

No WELFARE rancher wants wild horses competing with his cows for forage on the public land he is getting on the cheap, so the horses gotta go.

Because the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) comes under the US Department of Interior (DOI) and NOT the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) it lacks the expertise to manage what amounts to the Nation’s beef supply.  And that is exactly what it is trying to do by damming the will of the people of the United States of America and promoting cattle production.

Because of this food supply promotion, ranchers (typically multi-million dollar outfits and larger) have been getting what amounts to US Government WELFARE in the way of grazing allotments on the PUBLIC’S land.  And are the ranchers grateful for this government WELFARE program? Hell no, to this day they complain when they pay only $1.69 per cow/calf pair per month while their cattle over graze on the public’s land and pollute the public’s streams.

And the wild horses must go.

No WELFARE rancher wants wild horses competing with his cows for forage on the public land he is getting on the cheap, so the horses gotta go.

Round em up.  Helicopters.  Run to em to ground.  Scare the crap out of em.  Run em ‘till they drop.  Who cares if some die in the process.  BLM’s gonna just put em in some wild horse concentration camp.  No shade.  Some out of the way place.  Private property.  Don’t want these camps in the news.  Can’t have the public seeing our once beautiful symbol of the west, now incarcerated.  Their sad eyes.  Broken families.  Reminds me of another time and place.  Europe 1943…

And it goes on.

Cattle it seems will always trump wild horses.  The will of the people be dammed.

In case you didn’t know…

The Federal Livestock Grazing Program costs American taxpayers $123 million yearly.  Removing the cattle would actually save taxpayers money.  Planned helicopter removal of wild horses will cost nearly 10 times more than the revenues received from livestock grazers.

“The continual damage to the land from cattle and sheep grazing and the yearly drain on taxpayers who foot the bill for welfare ranching has to stop,” says Toni Moore of The Cloud Foundation (TCF).

To hear the BLM tell the story, it’s the wild horses that do all the damage.  Now, one would only have to think about that for a minute. Let’s see, horses have been in North America for about 9,000 years.  There shouldn’t be much left of anything, not a blade of grass, not a bush, nada.  Not after all that time.  The ranges should be bare if the horses do so much damage.  How does the BLM think ANYWAY?

“BLM’s historic scapegoating of wild horses is a smoke screen,” says Ginger Kathrens,* western rangeland damage is caused by millions of head of privately-owned livestock, not our publically owned and theoretically protected wild horses.”

Until the BLM finds addresses the real culprit, the overpopulation of welfare livestock, our historic wild horse herds will soon become extinct.

*Ginger Kathrens, Volunteer Executive Director of TCF, a Colorado based non-profit which advocates for the protection and preservation of wild horses on public lands.

27 wild horses die in Soda Fire, near (supposed) opened livestock fencing gate

In reading the BLM “news” release below, I had a couple of thoughts:
1)  There should be NO LIVESTOCK FENCING ON PUBLIC LANDS.  Why should structures for a PRIVATE BUSINESS be allowed on public lands?
2)  The “terrible truth” is that if there wasn’t livestock fencing on public lands, and if the BLM wasn’t using a helitorch, which makes the fire spread very fast and far, these 28 wild horses might’ve been able to escape BEFORE they “were overtaken.”
In memory of the wild horses that died because of livestock fencing/fast spreading fire, here is a video showing the beauty of the wild horses of the Hardtrigger HMA:

_______________________________________________________________________________
Twenty-Seven Wild Horses Perish in Soda Fire
BOISE — Twenty-seven wild horses died near Salmon Creek within the Hardtrigger Herd Management Area, about 45 miles southwest of Boise, when they were caught in the fast-moving Soda Fire.
The horses were found by a team of BLM employees and a veterinarian who were checking the condition of two herds in the area.  A gate was opened near the animals, but they were overtaken before they could escape.
“Due to the severe and erratic nature of the fire, we anticipate there will be more horses that were injured as they tried to escape the fire,” said Acting BLM District Manager Jenifer Arnold. “It’s a terrible reality for wildlife, livestock and wild horses living on the range, to be overtaken by an intense, wind-drive range fire.”
Additionally, two horses have been euthanized because their injuries were so extensive that they could not have survived.
Three wild horse herds were affected by the Soda Fire.  The Sands Basin herd has about 60 horses and the Hardtrigger herd has roughly 170 animals. The third herd management area, Black Mountain, was not damaged to nearly the extent of the other two.
“Most of the wild horses have been able to find water and at least some forage,” Arnold said. “We began to haul supplemental hay in last week and we’ll continue to monitor the herds’ condition.”

Because of the condition of the horses and the lack of long-term forage to sustain them, an emergency gather is planned.  The horses will be cared for off the range until they can return when conditions improve.  Dates for the gather have not been determined.

**As fire suppression activities continue on the Soda Fire, there will be no media tours available to visit the Herd Management Areas.
 
 

 

BLM’s National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board Nominations Close Sept. 28

The BLM hasn’t nominated R.T. Fitch, Ginger Kathrens and other real wild horse & burro advocates in past years, so we’re all holding our breath to see which cattle activists (or horse haters) they’ll nominate this year.  Dave Duquette?  Baxter Black?

SOURCE:  the horse.com

Wild Horse Advisory Board Nominations Close Sept. 28

mustangs

(photo:  iStock)

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has announced that it is seeking public nominations over a 45-day period to fill three positions on its national Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board.

To be considered for appointment, nominations must be submitted via email or fax by Monday, Sept. 28 or postmarked by the same date. The BLM announced its formal request for nominations in the Aug. 14 Federal Register.

Appointments are for a term of three years and nominees are needed to represent the following categories of interest: humane advocacy groups, wildlife management organizations, and livestock management organizations.

The board advises the BLM (an agency of the Department of the Interior) and the U.S. Forest Service (an agency of the Department of Agriculture) on protection and management of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands administered by those agencies. The board generally meets twice a year and the BLM director can call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve without salary, but are reimbursed for travel and per diem expenses according to government travel regulations.

The advisory board comprises nine members who represent a balance of interests. Each member has knowledge or special expertise that qualifies him or her to provide advice in one of the following categories: wild horse and burro advocacy; wild horse and burro research; veterinary medicine; natural resources management; humane advocacy; wildlife management; livestock management; public interest (with special knowledge of equine behavior); and public interest (with special knowledge of protection of wild horses and burros, management of wildlife, animal husbandry, or natural resource management).

Individuals shall qualify to serve on the board because of education, training, or experience that enables them to give informed and objective advice regarding the interest they represent. They should demonstrate experience or knowledge of their area of expertise and a commitment to collaborate in seeking solutions to resource management issues.

Any individual or organization can nominate one or more persons to serve on the board, and individuals can also nominate themselves. In accordance with Section 7 of the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, federal and state government employees are not eligible to serve on the board.

For those interested, please submit a nomination letter and full resume. The following information must be provided:

  • The position(s) for which the nominee wants to be considered;
  • The nominee’s first, middle, and last name; business and home addresses and phone numbers; and email address;
  • The nominee’s present occupation/title and employer;
  • The nominee’s educational background (colleges, degrees, major field[s] of study);
  • The nominee’s career highlights;
  • The nominee’s qualifications, including relevant education, training, and experience; and
  • The nominee’s experience or knowledge of wild horse and burro management; experience or knowledge of horses or burros (equine health, training, and management); and experience in working with disparate groups to achieve collaborative solutions.

Applicants must also indicate any BLM permits, leases, or licenses held by the nominee or his/her employer; indicate whether the nominee is a federally registered lobbyist; and explain why the nominee wants to serve on the board. Also, at least one letter of reference from special interests or organizations the nominee represents must be provided.

Nominations can be submitted by email, fax, or mail:

  • Email nomination to Sarah Bohl at stbohl@blm.gov.
  • To send by the U.S. Postal Service, mail to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 1849 C Street, N.W., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Sarah Bohl WO-260, Washington, D.C. 20240.
  • To send by FedEx or UPS, please send to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, 20 M Street, S.E., Room 2134 LM, Attn: Sarah Bohl, Washington, D.C., 20003.
  • Fax nominations to Bohl at 202/912-7182.

Those with questions should call Bohl at 202/912-7263.

BLM National Wild Horse & Burro Advisory Board to Meet Sept. 2-3

(This meeting is really about BLM’s plans for STERILIZATION and minimally reproducing herds of the already mostly non-viable herds.  The reality is that nothing about BLM’s actions can be considered “protecting” wild horses and burros.  Please show up and make a public comment or send your comments to the email address given below.)


SOURCE:  thehorse.com

BLM Bullcrap DetectorThe Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board will meet Sept. 2-3 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, to discuss issues relating to the management and protection of wild horses and burros on Western public rangelands.

The meeting will take place Sept. 2 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Sept. 3 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., local time, at the the Sheraton Oklahoma City Downtown Hotel. The meeting will be live-streamed at http://www.blm.gov/live/.

The agenda of the upcoming meeting can be found in the Aug. 3 Federal Register.

The Advisory Board provides input and advice to the BLM as it carries out its responsibilities under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The law mandates the protection and management of these free-roaming animals in a manner that ensures healthy herds at levels consistent with the land’s capacity to support them. According to the BLM’s latest official estimate, approximately 58,150 wild horses and burros roam on BLM-managed rangelands in 10 Western states.

The public can address the board on Sept. 3 from 10:30 a.m. to noon, local time. Individuals who want to make a statement at Thursday’s meeting should register in person with the BLM by 10:15 a.m., local time, on that same day at the meeting site. Depending on the number of speakers, the board could limit the length of presentations, set at three minutes for previous meetings.

Speakers should submit a written copy of their statement to the BLM at the addresses below or bring a copy to the meeting. There will be a webcam present during the entire meeting and individual comments could be recorded. Those who would like to comment but are unable to attend can submit a written statement to the National Wild Horse and Burro Program, WO-260, Attention: Ramona DeLorme, 1340 Financial Boulevard, Reno, Nevada, 89502-7147.  Comments can also be emailed to the BLM at whbadvisoryboard@blm.gov; please include “Advisory Board Comment” in the email’s subject line.

For additional information regarding the meeting, please contact DeLorme, wild horse and burro administrative assistant, at 775/861-6583. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf can reach DeLorme during normal business hours by calling the Federal Information Relay Service at 800/877-8339.

The board generally meets twice a year and the BLM director can call additional meetings when necessary. Members serve without salary, but are reimbursed for travel and per diem expenses according to government travel regulations.

Harassing HorsesIn its management of wild horses and burros under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, the BLM is implementing recommendations made by a June 2013 report of the National Academy of Sciences. For instance, the BLM is taking actions to increase the use of population growth-suppression measures on overpopulated herds roaming Western public rangelands and implementing methods developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for more accurate population estimates.

BLM considers removing wild horses due to lack of unburned forage from the Soda Fire in Idaho

The last paragraph of the BLM “news” release below states that the BLM is “considering” a roundup of the wild horses, but that only “some” of them will be returned to the range.  Will the BLM suspend AUMs for livestock grazing if there “simply isn’t enough unburned forage to sustain” the wild horses?  Or will the BLM only remove the wild horses?  – Debbie
0.Par.45610.Image.300.451.1
Young horse from Sands Basin (photo: BLM)
BLM Monitors Status of Wild Horses Impacted by Soda Fire
BOISE –The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) continues to actively monitor the status of the wild horses in the Sands Basin and Hardtrigger Herd Management Areas (HMA).  The Sands Basin HMA is located about 13 miles southwest of Homedale and the Hardtrigger HMA is south of the Snake River between Murphy and U.S. 95 to the West – both HMAs are managed by the Owyhee Field Office.
The 265,000 acre Soda Fire has burned much of the Sands Basin (11,724 acres) and Hardtrigger (60,961 acres) HMAs.  Boise District Wild Horse Specialist Steve Leonard flew over the areas yesterday and counted at least 60 horses milling near Jump Creek in the Sands Basin Herd Management Area (HMA) in an unburned area.  BLM staff will haul supplemental hay to these horses today, as there was not enough unburned forage to sustain them.
Additionally, there are 170 horses in the Hardtrigger HMA, and many of them are roaming in unburned areas within the HMA.  It looks as though there is enough unburned forage to sustain the Hardtrigger horses at this time.
Due to the severe and erratic nature of the fire, it is likely there will be some horses with injuries incurred as they tried to escape the fire.  All gates have been opened and fences cut so horses could move out of the way of the fire.  However, one horse has been humanely euthanized as it had sustained fatal wire injuries.
BLM is considering an emergency wild horse gather to ensure the health and well-being of the horses for the long-term.  There simply isn’t enough unburned forage to sustain them through the winter.  Some of the horses will be taken to the Boise Wild Horse Corrals to be cared for until the range recovers and they can be returned to their HMAs.