European Horse Meat Food Fraud Scandal Explodes Again With the Arrest in Spain of a Dutchman Masterminding a New Illegal Horse Meat Operation!

Source:  Equine Advocates

As we continue to supply new information about the dangers, criminal activity and food fraud involved with the slaughter of equines for human consumption both in the U.S. and abroad, you must realize that all of these incidents are very much intertwined and connected. Please use this information to build your respective cases and arguments to your Members of Congress to stop the return of horse slaughter to this country.

This is a very critical time as we have been explaining and documenting for months. Right now, forces are in motion to reverse the defunding of horse meat inspectors and reopen horse slaughterhouses in the U.S. As we all know, there have been a million distractions by politicians and special interest groups to keep everyone’s eyes off the ball on a myriad of issues. Horse slaughter is one of them. We cannot be taken off guard, but that is exactly what these callous and greedy individuals are hoping for.

Please read this article and use it. Horse meat has been found in some chopped meat products in the American food supply as documented in a 2015 study by Chapman University. That is just the tip of the iceberg!  –  Equine Advocates

Source:   ibtimes.co.uk

Man at centre of 2013 horse meat scandal arrested for masterminding new large-scale operation

Convicted food fraudster Jan Fasen was arrested for masterminding a new illegal horse meat distribution network.

Horse meat is eaten regularly by many Europeans

by Josh Robbins

A Dutchman at the centre of the 2013 European horse meat scandal has been arrested in Spain accused of masterminding another illegal horse meat operation.

Jan Fasen was one of 25 people arrested in Spain, on 4 April, allegedly involved in large-scale horse-meat fraud, supplying food for human consumption in Belgium, Italy, Romania, the Netherlands and France.

Spanish authorities say Fasen is the ringleader of the syndicate, which allegedly slaughtered stolen and sick horses before sending them into the food chain, El Pais reports.

Police claim the gang forged documents to pass off ordinary domesticated and wild horses as those specifically farmed for meat production (abastos).

Read the rest of this article HERE.

 

 

Is Donkey Skin the New Ivory?

by Alixandra Caole Vila as published at Nature World News

African Donkeys are Being Slaughtered to Extinction

While China’s taste for elephant ivories have died down, it seems like their fondness has shifted to Donkey skin this time.

According to the National Council of Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty Against Animals (NSPCA), South African donkeys are being slaughtered to extinction for the gelatin found in their skin and their meat.

While the donkey-hide gelatin has no commercial value in Africa, it is a popular ingredient used to create Chinese medicine to treat anemia and menopause-linked ailments. The gelatin, called Ejiao in Chinese, reportedly stops bleeding and strengthens the blood.

“[Ejiao] is quite a popular ingredient in China that people may self-prescribe,” Chinese medicine expert Mazin Al-Khafaji told The Independent. “It’s a hard gel, made from donkey hide, which is then dissolved in hot water or alcohol. It’s also used topically in a cream, for leg ulcers for instance.”

CNN noted that because donkey skin is highly sought-after in China, the donkey population went down from 11 million to six million in the past 20 years. Approximately 80,000 animals had been sold in the first nine months of 2016. While the demand had delivered a valuable stream of foreign currency, it has placed small-scale farmers in a difficult situation.

China File said that because the price of donkeys increased, rural communities who depend on the animals for livelihood are suffering.

Speaking with Science Times, a donkey owner in Mogosani village named Ikgopeleng Tsietsoane shared that currently, the price of a donkey is 2,000 rand. It used to be only 400 rands ($30 or 29 euros).

At present, a number of African countries, including Niger and Burkina Faso, have banned China from buying their donkeys to save the docile beast’s population and the livelihood of locals. However, smuggling still persists in areas where it is considered illegal to do so…(CONTINUED)

http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/37104/20170406/is-donkey-skin-the-new-ivory-african-donkeys-are-being-slaughtered-to-extinction.htm