Horses at Axtell BLM Wild Horse Corrals quarantined after possible ‘Strangles’ outbreak

by as posted on Salt Lake Fox 13

“Healthy Wild Horses now in peril due to BLM’s FAKE law interpretations…”

AXTELL, Utah — The Bureau of Land Management and Axtell Contract Off-Range Corrals have issued a voluntary quarantine of wild horses at a facility due to a possible “Strangles” or equine distemper (Streptococcus equi) outbreak.

Horses at the Axtell Wild Horse Corrals facility are being tested for the infection after the animals contracted some sort of respiratory tract infection, a press release said. Individual horses are being tested, but an early diagnosis says the infection is “Strangles,” the press release continued.

The initial signs of the infection are fever, trouble swallowing, noisy breathing, swollen lymph nodes, and thick discharge from the nose. The infection is highly infectious, spread through contact, and can cause death in some cases, but no horse has been reported dead yet, the press release said.

According to the press release, the Axtell facility staff started noticing possible signs of the infection on March 27, mostly in the younger animals. The quarantine will delay the adoption of highly sought Sulphur and Frisco wild horses that were scheduled for adoption, the press release said. The public tour scheduled for April 19, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., however, has not been affected by the quarantine…click (HERE) for more BLM propaganda.

Horses at Axtell Wild Horse Corrals quarantined after possible ‘Strangles’ outbreak

 

Horses at Axtell Wild Horse Corrals Quarantined Until Further Notice

Healthy horses on the range in the Checkerboard area.  Photo: Carol Walker
In 2016,  25 burros (that we know of) died of a rare virus at this BLM facility.  http://sanpetemessenger.com/2016/11/02/dead-burros-in-axtell-contracted-rare-virus/ 
BLM’s Axtell, UT, holding facility is on a ranch owned by retired BLM employee Kerry Despain, who ran the now defunct prison mustang program at Gunnison prison.  There was an OIG investigation into Gunnison prison.
 
Learn more about strangles HERE.  How will the BLM disinfect the pastures?   –  Debbie
Source:  BLM
News Release
Utah State Office, Utah
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact:  Lisa Reid (435) 743-3128
April 3, 2017
Axtell, Utah – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Axtell Contract Off-Range Corrals have issued a voluntary quarantine of wild horses at the facility due to an outbreak of upper respiratory tract infection. Individual infected animals are being tested for the exact cause, but early diagnosis indicates “strangles” or equine distemper (Streptococcus equi).
This disease is highly contagious and spread by other infected horses. BLM officials have notified the Utah State Veterinarian of the outbreak, who visited the facility. Coordination is also occurring with Utah Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for testing of the infected horses.
On March 20, 2017 the Utah Department of Agriculture put out a reminder for equine owners regarding outbreaks of strangles, visit here: Biosecurity Reminder for Utah Horse Owners.
The Axtell facility staff began seeing signs of strangles on March 27 mostly within the younger animals that had naturally weakened or immature immune systems. No mortality of horses has occurred from the localized outbreak, only clinical signs are being observed at this time. The quarantine will delay the adoption of the highly sought after Sulphur and Frisco wild horses that were scheduled to be adopted at facilities across the country. This quarantine does not affect the Axtell facility public tour scheduled for April 19, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
“The BLM takes the health of every wild horse and burro seriously and the Axtell facility horses will be monitored closely by facility staff. After all signs of infection have passed, the horses will be scheduled for transfer to Oklahoma, Illinois, Arizona, Nevada, Colorado, California, and within Utah for adoption to qualified individuals,” said Gus Warr, Utah Wild Horse Program Manager.
Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1-800-877-8339 to leave a message or question for Public Affairs Specialist Lisa Reid. The FRS is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Replies are provided during normal business hours.

20 Environmental Groups Jointly Demand Wildlife Services Ban M-44 Cyanide Bombs in Idaho

 

Since 2000, Wildlife Services has killed more than 50,000 members of more than 150 non-target species, including federally and/or state-protected animals such as Mexican gray wolves, grizzly bears, kangaroo rats, eagles, falcons, California condors, red-tailed hawks, great horned owls, armadillos, pronghorns, porcupines, long-tailed weasels, javelinas, marmots, snapping turtles, turkey vultures, great blue herons, ruddy ducks, sandhill cranes and ringtail cats.

On March 28, 2017, a coalition of wildlife and conservation groups petitioned the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Wildlife Services (WS) and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) to immediately ban M-44 devices in Idaho. M-44s are cyanide bombs used by WS to kill local predators such as coyotes, as part of a larger taxpayer-funded wildlife eradication campaign wherein WS, on behalf of the federal government, slaughters millions of wild animals every single year.

The recent hospitalization of a youth and killing of a family dog in Idaho who encountered one of these ground weapons near their home was one motivator for the creation of this petition. The document lists many other incidents of indiscriminate pet injuries and killings by M-44s in Appendix A.

The petition specifically calls on the agencies to:

1. Cease all use of M-44 explosive cyanide devices on all land ownerships in the State of Idaho, and
2. Immediately remove any and all M-44s currently deployed on all land ownerships in Idaho.

Signage on BLM contractor’s property housing former wild horses. ~ photo by R.T. Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

In November 2016, WS committed to cease the use of M-44s on Idaho’s public lands. Also, in 2016, a workplan between WS and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District forbade the placement of these devices within a quarter mile of residences.

The recent incident with the teen and his pet occurred within a quarter mile of his home. The petition concludes this incident shows the “commitment to cease using M-44s on public lands in Idaho is inadequate to protect public safety and wildlife,” because either WS personnel are not carrying out the commitment or older bombs are still present on public land.

“Cyanide bombs are indiscriminate killers that must be banned,” Andrea Santarsiere, a senior attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a press release. “Any animal that might pull on the baited trigger is at risk, including endangered wildlife like Canada lynx and grizzlies, as well as people and pets. And in just the past few weeks these cruel devices have injured a child and killed an endangered wolf and several family dogs. Enough is enough.”

The petition explains:

Since 2000, Wildlife Services has killed more than 50,000 members of more than 150 non-target species, including federally and/or state-protected animals such as Mexican gray wolves, grizzly bears, kangaroo rats, eagles, falcons, California condors, red-tailed hawks, great horned owls, armadillos, pronghorns, porcupines, long-tailed weasels, javelinas, marmots, snapping turtles, turkey vultures, great blue herons, ruddy ducks, sandhill cranes and ringtail cats.

The petition also discusses how the cyanide bombs and other non-selective killing methods are actually unproductive because they disrupt ecosystem balances, can actually increase livestock losses and have not been shown to be economically effective.

Bethany Cotton, Wildlife Program Director for WildEarth Guardians, previously asserted to EnviroNews that “many ranchers peacefully coexist with coyotes and report no conflicts,” and that nonlethal predator response options include solar powered electric fencing and livestock dogs, amongst others.

“Ranchers can use less vulnerable types of livestock, hang flagging called ‘fladry,’ or actually put cowboys out there with their animals to discourage predator losses without resorting to demands for poisons and poisonous land mines that kill pets and non-target wildlife,” Erik Molvar, Executive Director of the Western Watersheds Project, told EnviroNews. He signed the petition on behalf of the coalition of environmental groups. “It is senseless and irresponsible for federal agencies to use taxpayer dollars to sow land mines and poisons in open country to kill native wildlife to prop up failing ranching operations,” he stated.

Federal law requires the petitioned agencies to provide a final decision in writing to the petitioners: Western Watersheds Project, Predator Defense, WildEarth Guardians, the Center for Biological Diversity, Friends of the Clearwater, Alliance for the Wild Rockies, Western Wildlife Conservancy, Nevada Wildlife Alliance, Gallatin Wildlife Association, Environmental Protection Information Center, the Wolf Conservation Center, Wilderness Watch, Klamath Forest Alliance, Northeast Oregon Ecosystems, Yellowstone to Uintas Connection, Footloose Montana, Animal Legal Defense Fund, Project Coyote, Voices of Wildlife and the Mountain Lion Foundation…(CONTINUED)

http://www.environews.tv/033017-20-environmental-groups-jointly-demand-wildlife-services-ban-m-44-cyanide-bombs-idaho/