Wild Horse Hater Ryan “Dinkie” Zinke refers to himself as a geologist: That’s a job he’s never held

Exposed: Horse Hater “Dinky” Zinke’s shell game to undermine Interior career employees and civil servants

by as published on Western Values Project

Interior Inspector General’s report released on “Dinky’s” reassignments

“Can’t afford to be surrounded by staff smarter than me, could make me look like a DINK!”

The Interior’s Inspector General released a report on Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke’s politically motivated efforts to reassign career civil servants at the department. The report found that there was no plan or reason for the reassignments, which follow a long list of other ethical lapses by the Secretary.

According to the report, of the 31 reassigned employees who were interviewed, only 8 had positive perceptions of their reassignment, while “17 senior executives selected for reassignment questioned whether these reassignments were political or punitive, based on a prior conflict with DOI leadership, or on the senior executive’s nearness to retirement. Many executives speculated that multiple reasons applied.” The report concluded that Interior officials should create a plan with criteria, document the reassignment process and consult with department leadership among other recommendations.

Western Values Project’s Executive Director Chris Saeger released the following statement on the report:

“This report confirms what we already knew – Ryan Zinke thinks there’s one set of rules for himself and another for everyone else.

Secretary Zinke has failed at just about every turn as the nation’s leading land manager, and this report is just one of many examples of his attempts to politicize the way our nation’s outdoor heritage is cared for. Much like the lack of documentation on his questionable travel expenses, Zinke seems to be skirting the law by failing to document his actions.

What is really hard to understand is how someone like Zinke is now attacking the very civil servants and career employees that ensure our national parks and public lands are maintained and managed now and for future generations.

Given his continued contempt for the career employees he now manages and how he’s stacked the deck for special interests, it is not hard to imagine that morale at the department is at rock bottom.”

Stacking the deck at Interior:

Western Values Project (WVP) has been documenting Interior’s revolving-door between lobbyist and appointees under Zinke at www.departmentofinfluence.org.

After a WVP Freedom of Information request, Interior released of the names of the Executive Resources Board (ERB), which was entirely comprised of political appointees until Interior included two career employees in November 2017. Interior has not released the current makeup of the board to determine if it is indeed ‘nonpartisan.’

One of the new employees on the board had previously been appointed to a Deputy Director position under President Bush and was involved in several controversial decisions, including mountaintop removal, that benefited industry. The other new board member was part of Interior’s efforts to scrap the 2015 hydraulic fracturing rule.

WVP filed suit against Interior in federal court to force the disclosure of documents related to the board’s work.

Contempt for career civil servants:

Zinke called civil servants ‘serpents’ when suggesting he’d like to privatize campgrounds across the nation’s national parks.

He told an oil industry group that he had ‘30 percent of the crew that’s not loyal to the flag.’

Zinke threatened to eliminate 4,000 employees at Interior through draconian budget cuts. A memo from the acting director of the Bureau Land Management (BLM) was sent to employees saying that they should expect to lose 1,000 positions by 2017.

The IG investigation was opened in September 2017 regarding the “extraordinary and politically suspect reassignment of dozens of Senior Executive Service (SES) members.”

Interior Secretary Zinke wants to defund a vital land conservation program he supposedly supports

by Greg Zimmerman as published on Westwise

The secretary proposes draconian cuts to the Land & Water Conservation Fund

Whitefish Lake, Montana. LWCF funds helped secure the water supply in Ryan Zinke’s adopted hometown. Photo: Trust for Public Land via Land & Water Conservation Fund Coalition

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has turned his back on Montana, a state he represented in Congress until last year. The latest example is his proposed 2019 Interior Department budget, where the secretary proposes eliminating virtually all funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). The premise of LWCF is simple: the United States invests a small portion (up to $900 million annually) of the revenue generated from offshore oil drilling into land conservation, outdoor recreation, and public lands access.

For any good politician from Montana, LWCF is like motherhood and apple pie. It’s one of those rare bipartisan programs that works because its impacts are widely felt by anyone who values protecting and enhancing access for hunting, fishing, hiking, and camping on America’s public lands. And in Montana, that’s virtually everyone.

Sen. Steve Daines, (R-MT):

“LWCF was created in the spirit of reinvesting the revenues from the sale of our national resources into future resources for all Americans — asset for asset.”

Sen. Jon Tester, (D-MT):

“I applaud every effort to increase recreational opportunities for Montanans and this money will go a long way towards doing that. LWCF is a critical boost to Montana’s economy, our western way of life, and our outdoor heritage.”

Rep. Greg Gianforte, (R-MT):

“I will also fight for the permanent reauthorization of the Land and Water Conservation Fund to help preserve and expand access for Montanans to hunt, fish, and recreate on public lands.”

Gov. Steve Bullock, (D-MT):

“[LWCF] has ensured that generations of Montanans had access to public lands and waterways that otherwise would be locked up. Montanans demand more from Washington.”

In today’s overheated political environment, you’d be hard-pressed to find a program with stronger and more intense bipartisan support than LWCF. But Interior Secretary Zinke — who is known to harbor future political aspirations in Montana — apparently missed the memo. He’s put forward a budget proposal that effectively zeroes out LWCF.

If Congress was to implement Secretary Zinke’s proposal — an improbability given the broad, bipartisan support for LWCF — important conservation projects would go unfunded, recreation areas could be lost to subdivisions, trophy homes could be built inside national parks like Zion and Glacier, and funds won’t be available to open up new hunting and fishing access on public lands. What’s more, Secretary Zinke’s proposal would leave states and local communities in the lurch, taking away a critical source of money for local recreation facilities, state parks, working forests, and wildlife protection programs…(CONTINUED)

View story at Medium.com

Zinke Proclaims Sportsmen ‘Greatest Conservationists’ Before Signing Big Game Habitat Order

Written by Joseph Witham as published on The St George News

“…revising wild horse and burro-appropriate management levels or removing horses and burros from winter range or migration corridors if they degrade habitat…”

U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan “Dinky” Zinke helps tag a mule deer near Salt Lake City, Utah, Feb. 9, 2018 | Photo courtesy of the Interior Department, St. George News

ST. GEORGE — While in Utah Friday, U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke helped tag mule deer near Salt Lake City before appearing at a hunting expo to sign a secretarial order intended to improve big game habitat in the Western U.S.

While tagging the deer, Zinke said he noted that a recently developed neighborhood nearby likely supplanted habitat that would have previously supported a herd of 300 deer.

In recognition of the impact growing human populations in the West have on big game migration, Zinke signed Secretarial Order 3362, designed to improve habitat quality and Western winter range and migration corridors ​for antelope, elk and mule deer.

The order also calls for greater collaboration among federal management agencies, states, private landowners and scientists to develop guidelines to help ensure healthy big game populations.

Joined by Utah Division of Wildlife Director Mike Fowlks and Mule Deer Foundation President Miles Moretti, Zinke signed the order before a gathered crowd at the Western Conservation and Hunting Expo in Salt Lake City.

At the conference, Zinke said management plans like the ones in the order are made possible from the billions in revenue generated by hunters and fishers buying tackle, ammunition and other gear.

“There is no greater conservationist than our sportsman,” he said.

“American hunters are the backbone of big game conservation efforts,” Zinke said, “and now working with state and private landowners, the department will leverage its land management and scientific expertise to both study the migration habits of wildlife as well as identify ways to improve the habitat.”

Zinke said a collaborative approach is necessary to implement the habitat protection and improvement goals of the order, given the migration patterns of big game species that cross over thousands of miles on all types of land.

In Southern Utah, mule deer travel up to 110 miles from Bryce Canyon National Park into the Arizona strip area. They cross state, private, tribal, Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service land. Part of the order’s goal is to address challenges encountered along the pathways of these migratory routes.

Specifically, the order proposes development of an action plan with the following goals:

  • Restoring degraded winter range and migration corridors by removing encroaching trees from sagebrush ecosystems, rehabilitating areas damaged by fire and treating invasive vegetation.
  • Revising wild horse and burro-appropriate management levels or removing horses and burros from winter range or migration corridors if they degrade habitat.
  • Working with private landowners and state highway departments to achieve permissive fencing measures, including working with ranchers to modify fencing.
  • Avoiding or minimizing development in the most crucial winter range or migration corridors during sensitive seasons.
  • Working with states on sagebrush restoration.

The order prioritizes public land management in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming​.​

“I’m not an advocate for ever selling or transferring public lands, but I am an advocate for management,” Zinke said, adding that the order emphasizes input from individual states.

The Center for Western Priorities, a conservation group, acknowledged that it’s important to plan for wildlife migration but noted that Zinke has inflicted major damage to lands by supporting the oil industry and recommending reductions to national monuments, the Associated Press reported.

“We won’t allow the secretary and his staff to greenwash this abysmal record with meager policy crumbs,” group Deputy Director Greg Zimmerman said in a statement.

The Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank, blasted the decision as nothing more than “bureaucratic window dressing” to cover up damage Zinke has done to the habitat.

“If Secretary Zinke were serious about increasing America’s wildlife populations, he would stand by Western governors’ protections for sagebrush country, restore public input on drilling decisions, and stand up for America’s national monuments and wildlife refuges instead of selling them out,” the organization said in a statement.

Zinke said environmental groups that criticize his monument recommendation are using “nefarious” and “false” claims. He said “every inch” of the lands stripped from the monuments are still protected under other designations.

Associated Press reporter Brady McCombs contributed to this report.

http://www.stgeorgeutah.com/news/archive/2018/02/09/jcw-zinke-proclaims-sportsmen-greatest-conservationists-before-signing-big-game-habitat-order/#.Wn59zIJG3OQ

Zinke Flips Westerners the Bird

by Jesse Prentice-Dunn as published on WestWise

Interior Secretary set to ignore overwhelming public feedback in scrapping landmark sage-grouse conservation plans

Dinky Zinke, “Ya buddy, I could pop-off one of those puffed up puppies right now.!”

In less than one year on the job, Interior Secretary Zinke has taken a wrecking ball to America’s public lands legacy. From the unprecedented step of dramatically shrinking national monuments to proposing massive entrance fee hikes for national parks, he has made his doctrine clear — public lands are for extractive industries, not the American people.

Zinke has justified his actions by saying he’s merely listening to the public, but a closer look shows the public overwhelmingly supports conserving our public lands for future generations and opposes selling out our lands to oil, gas, and coal companies. For example, more than 2.8 million Americans, along with local businesses and the burgeoning outdoor industry, asked Zinke to leave our national monuments intact. He expressly rejected that input in recommending that President Trump dramatically shrink six national monuments.

Now, after Zinke announced his intent to eviscerate collaborative land management plans that balance sage-grouse conservation with energy development, Westerners are asking him to honor the deal that was struck and leave the plans alone. The feedback has been overwhelming:

  • The Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service collectively received nearly 400,000 comments urging them to leave sage-grouse conservation plans intact.
  • At 15 public meetings scattered across the region, sportsmen and women, ranchers, business owners, and conservationists urged the agencies to honor the deal they brokered in 2015.
  • Western governors of both parties, including Matt Mead (R-WY), John Hickenlooper (D-CO), Brian Sandoval (R-NV), and Steve Bullock (D-MT), made it clear that major changes to the plans are not needed.
  • A poll just released by Colorado College found that 64 percent of Westerners support keeping the existing plans in place.
  • Editorial boards and opinion writers around the West have asked Zinke to leave the sage-grouse plans alone.

Will Secretary Zinke listen?….(CONTINUED)

View story at Medium.com

Wild Horse & Burro Updated 12 Days of Christmas

Reprint from 2009 by R.T. Fitch ~ Author/president Wild Horse Freedom Federation

(Characters have changed, content/intent same this year as yesteryear)

Through the Eyes of the Wild Ones

(to be sung to the tune of “The 12 days of Christmas”)

On the first day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
One rogue Federal agency.

On the second day of Christmas,
  Ryan Zinke gave to me
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the third day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the fourth day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the fifth day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Five bogus dates,
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the sixth day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Six agents lying,
Five bogus dates,
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the seventh day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Seven slaughter setups,
Six agents lying,
Five bogus dates,
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the eighth day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Eight covert round-ups,
Seven slaughter setups,
Six agents lying,
Five bogus dates,
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the ninth day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Nine laws a-breaking,
Eight covert round-ups,
Seven slaughter setups,
Six agents lying,
Five bogus dates,
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the tenth day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Ten ranges barren,
Nine laws a-breaking,
Eight cover round-ups,
Seven slaughter setups,
Six agents lying,
Five bogus dates,
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the eleventh day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Eleven States now ruined,
Ten ranges barren,
Nine laws a-breaking,
Eight covert round-ups,
Seven slaughter setups,
Six agents lying,
Five bogus dates,
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

On the twelfth day of Christmas,
Ryan Zinke gave to me
Twelve million heartbreaks,
Eleven States now ruined,
Ten ranges barren,
Nine laws a-breaking,
Eight covert round-ups,
Seven slaughter setups,
Six agents lying,
Five bogus dates,
Four zeroed herds,
Three covert bait traps,
Two convict pilots,
And one rogue Federal agency.

Let’s Pray for a NEW version, Next Year!!!

“Dinky” Zinke says energy wasn’t involved in Bears Ears decision. Nuclear company documents say otherwise

By Meteor Blades  as published on The Daily KOS

“…there was heavy lobbying in favor of reducing the monument’s acreage by the owner of the nation’s only remaining uranium mill. …”

Interior Secretary Ryan “Dinky” Zinke snaps at pro monument activist ~ Francisco Kjolseth

Secretary of Interior Ryan “Dinky”  Zinke has made it a point to declare that energy concerns had nothing to do with his recommendation to President Trump that Bears Ears National Monument in Utah be cut by 85 percent and the remnant hacked into bits. There’s no mine in Bears Ears, he told reporters after Trump issued two proclamations Tuesday cutting Bears Ears and another national monument in Utah, the Grand Staircase-Escalante.

But The Washington Post has obtained documents showing there was heavy lobbying in favor of reducing the monument’s acreage by the owner of the nation’s only remaining uranium mill. It sits just outside the boundary of Bears Ears as designated last year by President Obama, but miles away from the new boundary under Trump’s truncated designation.

Juliet Eilperin’s report on the documents shows that Energy Fuels Resources (USA) Inc., a subsidiary of a Canadian firm, lobbied the Trump regime to shrink the monument—which is rich with scenic beauty and ancient American Indian archeological sites—to make it easier to access deposits of uranium ore:

In a May 25 letter to the Interior Department, Chief Operating Officer Mark Chalmers wrote that the 1.35 million-acre expanse Obama created “could affect existing and future mill operations.” He later noted, “There are also many other known uranium and vanadium deposits located within the [original boundaries] that could provide valuable energy and mineral resources in the future.” […]

Energy Fuels Resources did not just weigh in on national monuments through public-comment letters. It hired a team of lobbyists at Faegre Baker Daniels — led by Andrew Wheeler, who is awaiting Senate confirmation as the Environmental Protection Agency’s deputy secretary — to work on the matter and other federal policies affecting the company. It paid the firm $30,000 between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30, according to federal lobbying records, for work on this and other priorities.

The company’s vice president of operations, William Paul Goranson, joined Wheeler and two other lobbyists, including former congresswoman Mary Bono (R-Calif.), to discuss Bears Ears in a July 17 meeting with two top Zinke advisers.

Although there are a few rich deposits in the world that are as much as 18 percent uranium, most sources, like those in Utah, are well below 1 percent. A mill uses various techniques to turn the ore into yellowcake—U308, triuranium octoxide. The milling process also leaves behind massive piles of tailings—powdery, slightly radioactive waste. The yellowcake is shipped to processing centers that turn it into uranium hexaflouride, which is then enriched to a level useful as fuel in commercial power reactors, a higher level for test reactors and production of medical isotopes, or to a much higher level for use in making nuclear weapons.

Right now, the price of yellowcake is about $25 a pound, well below Energy Fuels Resources’ $40-$50 break-even point. Unless that changes, no new mines are likely to be excavated in the parts of Bears Ears sheared away by Trump’s proclamations. But EFR is looking with hope at the Asian market, where a number of new uranium-fueled nuclear power plants are planned or already under construction and could boost uranium prices.

The U.S. market won’t help. Construction on two new nukes in South Carolina was begun in 2013. After delays and massive cost overruns, the half-completed project was shuttered this summer. Finishing them would have doubled their original estimated cost of $9.8 billion. In all likelihood, come the new year, two nukes being built in Georgia that are in the same delay-and-overrun bind as South Carolina’s will also be shuttered without producing a single kilowatt of electricity. No other U.S.  power projects are in the works and are unlikely to be any time soon, if ever.

It may make no difference at Bears Ears. If some already launched lawsuits against shrinking the monuments upends Trump’s proclamations—as many close observers strongly believe will be the case—Bears Ears will return to its originally designated boundaries, and there won’t be any uranium ore mined from deposits near the Energy Fuels Resources mill.

https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2017/12/9/1722816/-Zinke-says-energy-wasn-t-involved-in-Bears-Ears-decision-Nuclear-company-documents-say-otherwise

Wild Horse Hater “Dinky” Zinke seeks protections for public lands in his home state while attacking Utah monuments

Story by as published on Think Progress.org

Interior Secretary has a two-faced approach to public lands protection

President Donald Trump plans to visit Utah on Monday where he is expected to sign an executive order calling for major reductions in the size of the Bears Ears and the Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments. The dramatically smaller sizes of the two Utah national monuments would be based on recommendations made by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.

As part of his review of national monuments across the United States, the Interior secretary did not recommend a reduction in the size of any in his home state of Montana. In fact, Zinke, who represented Montana in Congress prior to taking over as Interior secretary earlier this year, recommended that Trump create a new 130,000-acre national monument in the Badger-Two Medicine area of northwestern Montana.

Both Bears Ears and Badger-Two Medicine are of cultural significance to Native American tribes. But only one is in Zinke’s home state.

“Everything that Secretary Zinke does in Montana is 180 degrees from what he does to the rest of the country,” Center for Western Priorities spokesperson Aaron Weiss told ThinkProgress. “Montana gets special treatment because he would like to be governor there some day.” The Center for Western Priorities is a nonprofit conservation and advocacy organization for communities in the Western United States.

The Department of the Interior did not respond to ThinkProgress’ request for comment on Zinke’s decision to seek a new national monument in Montana.

Altogether, Zinke advised Trump to shrink the boundaries of at least four national monuments, none of them in Montana. Secrecy shrouded the Interior secretary’s review of the status of national monuments. The Interior Department has never made Zinke’s full report available to the public. The report, however, was leaked to the Washington Post in September. In the report, Zinke did not recommend a reduction in the size of the Upper Missouri River Breaks, the only national monument located in Montana on the list for review by the Interior secretary…(CONTINUED)

https://thinkprogress.org/zinke-supports-montana-monuments-2610fc1d6351/

Horse Slaughter Proponent “Dinky” Zinke Gives Away Wildlife Habitat to his Colluding Lobbyist Buddies

Story provided by Western Values Project

“Wild Horse & Burro Hater ‘Dinky’ Zinke is hell bent on making nature an after-thought near protected public lands…”

Over the next month, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke is preparing to announce a series of oil and gas lease sales across the West. Given the administration’s favoritism to special interests in Washington, D.C., these proposed lease sales are poised to be an early holiday gift to the same oil and gas industry that helped propel it into office. For the rest of the West, these leases unnecessarily threaten some of our most pristine public landscapes, including several national parks, monuments, and communities.

A list of Secretary Zinke’s early holiday gifts to his lobbyist friends bordering or near our nation’s parks:

Basin and Range National Monument
Location of proposed leases: On border
Sale Date: December 12, 2017
Status: Auction pending
More Information

Great Basin National Park
Location of proposed lease: 4.5 miles
Sale Date: December 2017
Status: Environmental Assessment comment period ends September 18, 2017
More Information

Map
Nevada BLM’s December 2017 Lease Sale. Includes parcels (red) near Great Basin NP and bordering Basin and Range National Monument.

Canyons of the Ancient National Monument
Location of proposed leases: Bordering
Sale Date: March 19-23, 2018
Status: Final lease sale notice initiating protest period expected November 30, 2017
More Information

Hovenweep National Monument
Location of proposed leases: 5 miles
Sale Date: March 19-23, 2018
Status: Final lease sale notice initiating protest period expected November 30, 2017
More Information

Map
Utah BLM’s March 2018 Lease Sale. Includes parcels (red) near Hovenweep National Monument (blue) and directly along the western boundary of Canyons of the Ancients NM (purple).

Bears Ears National Monument
Location of proposed leases: 0.1 miles
Sale Date: March 19-23, 2018
Status: Final lease sale notice initiating protest period expected November 30, 2017
More Information

Map
Utah BLM’s March 2018 Lease Sale. Includes parcels (red) near the boundary of Bears Ears NM (purple).

Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument
Location of proposed leases: Bordering
Sale Date: March 13, 2018
Status: Final lease sale notice initiating protest period expected December 13, 2017
More Information

Map
Montana/North Dakota BLM’s March 2018 Lease Sale. Parcel (red) bordering Upper Missouri River Breaks NM (purple).

Theodore Roosevelt National Park
Location of proposed leases: Bordering
Sale Date: March 13, 2018
Status:Final lease sale notice initiating protest period expected December 13, 2017
More Information

Map
Montana/Dakotas BLM’s March 2018 Lease Sale. BLM proposing to lease a parcel (red) directly bordering the northern unit of Theodore Roosevelt NP (purple).

Dinosaur National Monument
Location of proposed leases: 1.3 miles
Sale Date: December 12, 2017
Status: Auction pending
More Information

Map
Utah BLM’s December 2017 Lease Sale. BLM proposing to lease parcels (red) near the western boundary of Dinosaur NM (purple).

Fort Laramie National Historic Site
Location: 0.3 miles
Sale Date: March 19, 2018
Status: Final lease sale notice initiating protest period expected November 29, 2017
More Information

Map
Wyoming BLM’s March 2018 Lease Sale. Includes parcels (red) less than ½ mile from the Fort Laramie National Historic Site (purple).

Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site
Location: 5 miles
Sale Date: December 12, 2017
Status: Auction pending
More Information

Map
Montana-Dakotas BLM is proposing to lease this parcel (red), which is about 5 miles from the Fort Union Trading Post National Historic Site (purple), as part of its December 2017 Lease Sale.

http://westernvaluesproject.org/zinkes-gift-to-his-oil-gas-friends/