BLM to let pubic have a quick peek at our wild horses imprisoned in Indian Lakes Rd. holding facility (on private property) in Fallon, NV

 Scan_Pic0002

It’s just a really quick peek, and instead of allowing the public to walk around the corrals, like we were allowed to do on the original tours, the BLM now puts you on a wagon, so that you can’t look too closely or take too many photos.  (photo: Debbie Coffey)

SOURCE:  BLM

Release Date: 05/04/16
Contacts: Jeremy Wilhelm, 775-475-2222, jwilhelm@blm.gov
News Release No. 2016-014

BLM offers two public tours of Fallon wild horse and burro corral

RENO, Nev. —The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is offering two public tours of the Indian Lakes Off-Range Wild Horse and Burro Corral in Fallon, Nevada, on Friday, May 20. The corral is one of three in Nevada that provides care to wild horses and burros removed from the range. Tour attendees will be able to observe a new water sprinkler system designed to increase animal comfort and reduce dust at the facility.

The public tours are scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. and each will last about two hours. Each tour will accommodate up to 20 people. Spaces will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. The public can sign up to attend and get driving directions to the facility by calling the Palomino Valley Center (PVC) at (775) 475-2222.

About a 90-minute drive east of Reno, the Indian Lakes Off-Range Corral is located at 5676 Indian Lakes Road, Fallon, and is privately owned and operated. Tour attendees will be taken around the facility as a group on a wagon to learn about the facility, the animals, and BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program. The new water sprinkler system will be in operation during the tour. The system includes 25 high-powered sprinklers that have the ability to provide cooling and dust abatement for most of the facility. The sprinklers are supplied by a commercial well that has the ability to pump approximately 700 gallons of water per minute.

The Indian Lakes facility can provide care for up to 3,200 wild horses or burros. The facility encompasses 320 acres containing 43 large holding pens, each pen measuring 70,000 square feet that will safely hold about 100 horses. The horses receive an abundance of feed tailored to their needs each day, along with a constant supply of fresh water through automatic watering troughs. Free choice mineral block supplements are also provided to the animals in each pen. A veterinarian routinely inspects the horses and provides necessary medical care as needed.

BLM strives to place horses that have been removed from the range into good, private homes. Horses at the Indian Lakes facility are made available to the public for adoption or sale throughout the year at off-site adoption events and through BLM’s Adoption or Sales Program. For more information visit: on.doi.gov/1Lkz8DD.

Visit on.doi.gov/1KUorJq to learn more about the Indian Lakes Off-Range Wild Horse and Burro Corral and the scheduled public tours.

6 comments on “BLM to let pubic have a quick peek at our wild horses imprisoned in Indian Lakes Rd. holding facility (on private property) in Fallon, NV

  1. Seriously – “up to 20 people” for 2 tours? Quick peek certainly describes it. Would be really great if they allowed someone (horse advocate) to video the horses & show individuals.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. BLM’s sweet deal (paid for with your tax dollars, of course!)
    April 17, 2011
    Debbie Coffey
    https://ppjg.me/2011/04/17/blm%E2%80%99s-sweet-deal-paid-for-with-your-tax-dollars-of-course/

    While many Americans have lost their homes or worry about losing their homes, and worry about finding or keeping their jobs, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) seems to be spending your hard earned tax dollars like high rollers.

    The BLM has its hand out at appropriations hearings asking for even more money for their mismanaged Wild Horse and Burro Program.
    Where’s your money going?
    Look at one example. Troy Adams/Broken Arrow USA has the contract for the
    Indian Lakes Road(AKA Broken Arrow) short term wild horse and burro holding facility in Fallon, NV.
    How does a guy from California, who sold a cloned cow, get enough knowledge in wild horse behavior, and enough ability in safely handling wild horses, to win a bid to manage a facility that can hold up to 3,000 of our wild horses?

    Troy Adams/Broken ArrowUSAcontract with the BLM is for 5 years (1/01/2010 to 12/31/2015):
    Base year (2010 – 2011) – $2,525,000 with an option for “additional labor” for $127,920 ($24.60 per hour, per laborer) to FREEZEBRAND, RETAG, TRIM FEET, ETC. (same tasks apply to years below)
    Year 1 (2011-2012) – $3,640,875 with an option for “additional labor” for $130,468 ($25.09 per hour)
    Year 2 (2012 – 2013) – $3,759,500 with an option for “additional labor” for $133,068 ($25.59 per hour)
    Year 3 (2013 – 2014) – $3,832,500 with an option for “additional labor” for $135,720 ($26.10 per hour)
    Year 4 (2014 – 2015) – $3,905,500 with an option for “additional labor” for $138,424 ($26.62 per hour)

    So, the estimated 5 year TOTAL is $17,663,375, with optional “additional labor” adding $665,600 to that the total is ($18,328,975). (Note: The money in this contract is based on estimated feed days. See details of this at the end of the article.)

    Over $18 million in 5 years. And since Troy Adams supplies the land, pens and corrals the first year, and it’s not an expense every year, why is there such a huge increase in the amount of money for in the remaining years of the contract?

    The contractor (Troy Adams) supplies: land, pens, corrals, feed, salt, minerals, water and personnel for general tasks.

    The BLM: pays for veterinary care, a farrier, hoof care (hey, are we paying for this twice, since TRIM FEET is listed above?), the working chute (squeeze chute), and prepares the paperwork for shipment of animals to other locations, prepares all wild horses and burros prior to shipment and paperwork related to vaccination or “other action taken.”

    One surprising item in this contract, on Page 5 of 15 (7 a.) is that this facility had to get permits required for a Confined Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO) according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. So, in more ways than one, it seems that our wild horses are considered to be, and are being treated as, livestock.
    IS THERE BREACH OF CONTRACT?

    Like

  3. Again, more money. Why is it that humans get more than the horses? It is all greed, greed, and more greed! I don’t believe there is one person with the BLM that cares about the horses just what they can make off of them! This whole thing is bullshit!!!

    Like

  4. I agree with Debra. This is bull! Just more money to be made by humans off of the horses! They (the government and BLM) do not care!!

    Like

  5. Was anyone who attended this “tour” able to get photos and tag numbers of any of the horses? If so, where can they be viewed?

    Like

Care to make a comment?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s