BLM Wild Horse Butcher Shop: Opening Soon in Oregon

text and photos by R.T. Fitch

BLM Recipe for Unimaginable Cruelty:

  • 1 part mares over 11 years
  • 1 part 8 month old fillies
  • 1 part pregnant mares
  • 3 parts non-sterile instruments and environment
8 month old fillies at BLM's Hines, Oregon holding facility...waiting for the "experiment"

8 month old fillies at BLM’s Hines, Oregon holding facility…waiting for the “experiment”

First begin by sorting your current inventory of captured mares. Segregate the old useless mares into one corral, first. Repeat the process for 8-month-old fillies but be sure to separate your pregnant mares into the three stages of gestation for ease of identification.

Assess your on-hand supply; if short on quantity needed to satisfy blood lust initiate cruel and destructive bait trapping and helicopter roundups in both South Steens and Three Fingers HMAs.

Steens HMA wild horse family, about to be destroyed by BLM

Steens HMA wild horse family, about to be destroyed by BLM

Once fully stocked with frightened wild horse mares and babies locate a suitable location to prepare the gruesome concoction; any unsanitary, non-sterile environment such as a dusty, fly ridden, feces filled corral area will do.

You are now ready to proceed with an unprecedented attack upon America’s federally protected wild horses and the complete disregard for the will of the tax-paying American public.

If in doubt on the proper slash and dash techniques feel free to contact your local, unethical, state funded College for mindless guidance on how to torture and ultimately doom wild mares and babies to a gruesome and grisly death.

Home of BLM butcher shop at Hines holding facility

Home of BLM butcher shop at Hines holding facility

As you proceed be certain to rush the process with little regard for the lives that you are destroying. Be sure to cause as much pain and misery as possible. Ensure that the public has no access to your operation. Once completed give minimal oversight for recovery and survival.

Next, log your statistics of deaths and survivors in a secret journal and be certain to sell any surviving mares and babies off to slaughter so as to remove any form of evidence from the American public.

Congratulations, you are now qualified to prepare your deadly concoction on wild mares and babies in the wild and on the range; rest assured, you have made BLM management and their special interest bedfellows (Welfare Ranchers) very proud.

 

BLM to Start Brutally Sterilizing Wild Horses

Source: Multiple

Sadistic War on Wild Horses Sinks to New Moral and Ethical Lows

BLM to Conduct Frankenstein experiments on live, female wild horses.

BLM to Conduct Frankenstein experiments on live, female wild horses.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is on a path to sterilize wild horses on U.S. rangeland to slow the growth of herds — a new approach condemned by mustang advocates across the West.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management also continues to resist calls from ranchers and western Republicans to euthanize or sell for slaughter the animals overflowing holding pens so as to clear the way for more roundups.

Bureau of Land Management Deputy Director Steve Ellis delivered those messages at an emotional congressional hearing this week. He offered a glimpse of the challenges facing the agency that has been struggling for decades with what it describes as a $1 billion problem.

Highlights of the hearing included Nevada’s state veterinarian calling for the round-up and surgical sterilization of virtually every mustang in overpopulated herds, a protester who briefly interrupted with shouts denouncing “welfare ranchers” turning public lands into “feedlots,” and an Arkansas congressman whose puppy is about to get neutered.

Rep. Tom McClintock, chairman of the House Natural Resources subcommittee on public lands, took aim at those who object to euthanizing mustangs “and yet seem perfectly willing to watch them succumb to excruciating death by starvation, dehydration and disease.”

“That is the future we condemn these animals to if we don’t intervene now,” the California Republican said.

Rep. Cynthia Lummis, R-Wyoming, emphasized the 1971 law protecting mustangs allows for their destruction if they go unadopted. But since 2012, Congress has required horse purchasers to sign documents promising not to resell them for slaughter, and the Bureau of Land Management opposes lifting those restrictions.

Ellis said the estimated 67,000 wild horses and burros on federal land in 10 states is 2.5 times more than the range can support. However, there’s no more room in government corals and leased pastures, where 47,000 horses cost taxpayers about $50,000 per head over the course of their lifetime.

“Quite frankly, we can’t afford to feed any more unadopted horses,” Ellis said. “I understand your frustration. We are frustrated too.”

Ellis said the agency’s “roadmap to the future” includes use of temporary contraceptive vaccines as well as sterilization.

“We feel that before we can implement a spay-neuter program on the range, we’ve got to do the research to make sure we can do it efficiently and safely,” he said. “It is going to take a little time to do that.”

Rep. Rod Bishop, R-Utah, chairman of the Natural Resources Committee, said it’s time to have “that real tough conversation about something more permanent.”

Other Republicans turned on the lone horse advocate called to testify — Ginger Kathrens, founder of The Cloud Foundation based in Colorado Springs, Colorado and member of the Bureau of Land Management’s wild horse advisory committee.

But Kathrens said most Americans want to see mustangs “roam freely on their native home ranges as intended.”

“Castration, sterilization and long-term confinement of horses in holding facilities … is unnecessary, cruel, unhealthy and fiscally irresponsible,” she said.

Rep. Bruce Westerman, R-Arkansas, noted, however, that “thousands of domesticated animals are spayed and neutered every day.”

“I’ve got a new puppy and he’s got his day coming soon,” he said.

That prompted an outburst from Edita Birnkrant, campaigns director for Friends of Animals.

“They are wild animals. They are not cats and dogs,” she shouted as McClintock banged the gavel and called for Capitol Police. “The solution is getting welfare ranchers off of our public lands, which have been turned into feedlots.”

J.J. Goicoechea, the Nevada Department of Agriculture’s veterinarian and longtime rancher, urged the gathering of “as close to 100 percent of horses as we can” in overpopulated herds for surgical sterilization before returning some to the range.

“Those of us who truly make a living caring for animals … have a moral obligation to manage populations in balance with natural resources,” he said.

Feel Good Sunday: Sometimes Less is More

by R.T. Fitch ~ president/co-founder of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Enjoy Today, Prepare for Tomorrow

photo by Carol Walker of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

photo by Carol Walker of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

I’ve spent quite a bit of time scouring the internet for some good and meaningful equine news to share with our supportive readers and advocates (you) but from one ranch hand to another, “It’s kinda slim pickens out there.”

So I will turn inwards for just a moment and let you know that on this day I am out on the range with the horses and burros, on their rightful land, accompanied by a very dear and wonderful friend.  Life just doesn’t get much better than that…and our thoughts are with you as we watch the herds kick up the dust and run faster than the wind, it still makes my heart stop.

Okay, with that said, take a deep breath and enjoy the remainder of the day because the horses and burros are going to need you to be their voices this week, and if we lose this one we have lost it all.

If I fail to post in the morning, it’s because we will be getting an early start to get out on the range before sun-up so I will give you a little bit of home work for Monday morning…please, re-read this post, link below, and make the calls; then tune into Wild Horse and Burro Radio on Wednesday night (Moved to Friday Evening) for a very special, call to action broadcast.

It’s time to saddle up and get her done, folks.

Keep the faith!!!

http://wp.me/pyapj-cs9

One Lone Voice Testified for Wild Horses & Burros

by Dianne L Stallings, Ruidoso News

“America’s federal lands belong to us all, genetically viable wild horses and burros deserve a permanent and a fairly allocated piece of that land, a lasting home on the range.”

Ginger filming Cloud and Family, May 2014 ~ photo by R.T. Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Ginger filming Cloud and Family, May 2014 ~ photo by R.T. Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

Ginger Kathrens, founder and volunteer executive director of the wild horse advocacy organization The Cloud Foundation, testified Wednesday at a House Subcommittee on Federal Lands oversight that instead of embracing realistic management strategies, the Bureau of Land management and some western politicians have attempted to derail the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act aimed at protecting wild horses on public lands.

Katherns, whose documentation of Cloud the Wild Stallion represents the only continuing chronicle of a wild animal from birth in the hemisphere, appeared by invitation from U.S. Rep. Raul Grijalva, a Democrat from Arizona.

On May  11, officials with the BLM issued a press release contending wild horse and burro populations on public rangelands had increase by 2.5 percent from 1971 when the protection law was passed, Kathrens said, but she laid the blame for mismanagement on the agency. Kathrens said 22 years ago she was asked to create a film about mustangs for Marty Stouffer’s “Wild America.” She began filming the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range in southern Montana, and almost immediately realized that she was documenting a complex species living in a tightly knit social bands.

“It is this family band structure which is emblematic and essential to the survival of wild horses,” she said. “Nonetheless, the BLM regularly overlooks this important point when development management practices.”

The National Academy of Science in a BLM commissioned two-year study of the wild horse and burro program stressed the importance of maintaining natural behaviors, she said. She also disputed BLM reference to the horses as feral or alien, pointing out that wild herds genetically are linked to North America. The NAS study also found that BLM removal of animals from the range causes populations to grow at high rates, because their numbers are held below levels affected by food limitation and density dependence.

Overpopulation of wild horses and burros on public lands has been alleged by the BLM for years, Kathrens said. “However the BLM manages the population of most herd management areas at levels far below the population required for genetic viability, from 150 to 200 animals,” she said in her testimony. “BLM has so marginalized wild horses that the majority of herds are too small to meet even minimal standards to ensure their genetic viability. It is obvious that one solution to warehousing wild horses and burros in costly short-term holding is a reexamination of appropriate management levels and a fairer allocation of available forage between wild horses and livestock.”.

Cost effective humane alternatives to removal from the range include fertility control, using a two-year vaccine resulting in a $40,000 savings to taxpayers for each treatment or retreatment of mares, she said.

Thousands of caring, well-informed and well-trained volunteer field experts are available to assist federal agencies and organizations in implementing healthy and cost-effective alternative management approaches in the wild, Kathrens said.

“America’s federal lands belong to us all, genetically viable wild horses and burros deserve a permanent and a fairly allocated piece of that land, a lasting home on the range.”

Accurate monitoring of herds is needed along with more emphasis on grazing buyouts, a financial incentive to holders of permits to swap some portion of their allowed livestock Animal Unit Month for use by wild horses and burros in exchange for at least fair market value payment, as well as the opportunity to profit from wild horse and burro tourism, Kathrens said. Repatriation, returning short-term holding horses, has long been discussed as a way to quickly relieve a significant drain on the BLM budget.

The Humane Advocate on BLM’s National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board, Kathrens contends the BLM alternatives are not humane and do not consider the welfare of a species protected by a unanimously passed act of Congress. They include deadly sterilization experiments on wild mares.

“In 1990 the Government Accountability Office reported: ‘BLM’S decisions on how many wild horses to remove from federal rangelands have not been based on direct evidence that existing wild populations exceed what the range can support. While wild horses are routinely removed. Livestock grazing frequently remains unchanged or increased after the removal of wild horses, increasing the degradation of public lands,’” she said.

Overgrazing, overpopulation and unsustainability are over-generalized and non-scientific claims by the BLM to justify removals of horses and burros from public lands, Kathrens said. Castration, sterilization, and long-term confinement in holding facilities are unnecessary, cruel, unhealthy, and fiscally irresponsible methods of controlling horse and burro populations, ultimately leading to the potential extermination of rare and native wild horse herds, she contended.

“We know from successful PZP programs and alternative management approaches that the government does not need to remove wild horses and burros from federal lands to effectively manage them, she told subcommittee members. “There are reasonable, cost effective and humane alternatives to current and/or proposed BLM wild horse and burro management policies/approaches; namely those including proper PZP application. Maintaining wild horse and burro herds in the wild can be financially and culturally beneficial to local communities as well as fulfill an iconic image of western heritage. Revenue from wild horse viewing and photography is the main economic driver in the small towns of Maybell, Colo. and Lovell, Wyo. due to the presences of wild horse herds.”

She claimed that rangeland degradation by wild horses has been grossly overstated by the BLM to cover up years of livestock overgrazing.

http://www.ruidosonews.com/story/news/local/2016/06/23/wild-horse-advocate-testifies/86298698/

Putting An End To Animal Abuse At Havasu Falls

By: Michelle Grinnell as published on The Outbound Collective

This is ugly. The good news? Things are moving in the right direction.

Photo: Tiffany Nguyen

Photo: Tiffany Nguyen

Havasu Falls is one of the most picturesque waterfalls in the country, if not the entire planet. Nestled deep within the Grand Canyon on the Havasupai Indian Reservation, thousands of visitors are flocking each year to get a glimpse of the pristine turquoise waters that make the falls so special. The destination is rapidly growing in popularity as vacationers post exquisite photographs of the falls on social media. This is the means by which my sister and I learned about this beautiful place, and we immediately made reservations to stay for a few nights.

Getting there is no easy task, as the 10-mile trail from the Hualapai Hilltop to the campground is not accessible by car. Access to the falls is available by helicopter, but most tourists opt to hike in, and many use pack horses and mules to pack their gear, to make the hike less physically taxing. Unfortunately, we learned very quickly that the gorgeous pictures we had marveled at on Instagram and Facebook, our very inspiration for making this journey, were not an accurate representation of all that one will witness while visiting Supai.

Just before dawn on April 19, 2016, my sister and I began the journey from the start of the trail at the Hualapai Hilltop. As we descended into the canyon, it wasn’t long before we came upon the first string of packhorses quickly approaching. We were immediately struck by how sickly many of them looked, noting not only how malnourished they appeared, but also how several of them had open sores where the leather on the pack saddles and straps had rubbed them raw. We looked at each other in shock and discussed our relief at having packed our equipment in ourselves rather than having paid to use the services of these horses. The effects on this community as a result of years of impoverishment were not lost on us; we knew we’d observe animals that were underfed and somewhat atrophied, but this seemed like something more. As we entered the village, making our way to the tourist office, we passed numerous pens containing horses that were emaciated; some eating their own dung or garbage. Later in the evening, after the pack horses had been retired for the day, we witnessed horses that had moderate to severe wounds, where their hides had been split open from heavy loads and ill-fitting saddles. We photographed some of the worst cases, where some had backs that were gushing with blood, with the bones in their spine exposed. We wondered how so many of these severe injuries could possibly go unreported…and later surmised that they go largely unnoticed by many tourists as they are hidden away under packsaddles and camping gear; only at the end of the day when the saddles are removed would these injuries become visible. We decided that we could not ignore this.

e366b3233f101dd56e4f913811f8e518Upon our return home, we began to research our options. We understood that because these actions are taking place on tribal land, and the Havasupai are their own sovereign nation, regular means of law enforcement would not necessarily apply. This would make our quest for justice for these animals an arduous one. Was there a way to provide immediate help some of the most habitually abused and neglected horses and also offer resources to the tribe so that different procedures could be implemented moving forward? Was there a path to holding chronic abusers of these horses accountable for their actions and rescuing horses that were in the most deplorable of conditions, while also encouraging and fostering existing good practices for horse owners who were acting responsibly? We soon learned that addressing these questions in a sensitive manner for the sake of the tribe, yet holding firm with our conviction that the abusers in the community must be held liable, proved to be an enormous challenge.

The first step was to contact members of the Havasupai Tribal Council to voice our concerns and to ask how we could work together to resolve this. We emailed every available contact listed on their official website and left voicemails on every phone line. Days passed with no response. We tried again once more, this time also phoning and emailing the Bureau of Indians affairs, and like our first attempts, we were met with silence.

It was then decided that sharing our photographs and story on social media would at the very least, help to spread awareness to the general public. More importantly we hoped this knowledge would be passed to tourists travelling there, with the hope that they would elect to travel with compassion and pack in their own equipment or use the helicopter, rather than to use one of these animals. We also included a petition, created by another group of citizens concerned for the welfare of these animals, which implores the Havasupai Tribal Council to establish and implement a minimum standard of care for these horses and to stop the violent individuals responsible for the most atrocious acts of cruelty.

The Facebook post we made went viral. Not only was it shared almost twenty-one thousand times, but the comments and private messages that came flooding in after, from tourists who had visited Supai before we had been there, began to illuminate a deeply disturbing pattern of enduring and violent abuse of these horses and mules that has been spanning decades. Some said they saw horses being punched and kicked on the trail after they had collapsed from exhaustion and could not take another step forward. Others said they saw a mule being beaten with a chain as it lay on the ground from fatigue. More still, have watched horses plummeting off the switchbacks from weariness, and left there by their handlers, on the canyon floor to die, rather than be euthanized or given any veterinary treatment. One said they witnessed these acts of cruelty as far back as 2006. Another said they noticed this as far back as 1989…The petition, which now has nearly two hundred thousand signatures, catalogues even more stories of visitors witnessing brutal maltreatment, but didn’t think they could do anything about it because the abuse happened on tribal land and local authorities would have no power to stop it.

The public outcry has been infectious. We utilized it to reach out to media outlets in order to keep pushing awareness. We joined forces with other individuals who expressed trepidation regarding this issue and pressed several of the tour outfitters who lead trips to Havasupai Falls to cease the use of the packhorses. None were willing to address there is an ongoing problem…until just recently. After being faced with the continuing negative publicity, Wildland Trekking, one of the larger of several tour outfitters offering guided trips in Havasu, announced their suspension of use of pack animals. On June 1st 2016, in a statement from Steve Cundy, Director of Sales and Customer Service, Wildland Trekking will move forward, “…using a combination of porters and the existing helicopter service to transport supplies in and out of Havasu Falls. Backpacking options will also be available. There will be a transition period where we work to hire and train a crew of porters and develop the needed infrastructure. People who are already booked will be accommodated under this new system”.

Dead BurroBy taking leadership on this issue where others would not, Wildland Trekking may have just changed the game. Their willingness to acknowledge that this has been an ongoing problem that can no longer be ignored and modify their business practices as a result, displays an integrity we are now asking from the rest of the tour operators working in Havasupai. Outfitters who profit off the backs of these animals need to actively participate to ensure their welfare. It’s not just good business practice, it’s an ethical responsibility. We urge these companies to revise their practices in one of two ways. Primarily, we’d like to see tour business eliminate packhorses as an option and replace them with a viable alternative, just as Wildland has, so that human porters and the helicopter become the sole methods for hauling gear, beyond guests packing their own equipment. The second approach would be to require outfitters to contribute their own income to help employ an enforceable standard of care. Part of that requirement would necessitate that the tribe allow an independent entity to regularly come to Supai to ensure compliance to confirm that the animals are receiving adequate water and feed on a consistent basis at the Hilltop and in the village, proper rest, consistent veterinary and farrier care, and an animal husbandry education program. Most importantly, this includes reporting and prosecuting abusers. Demanding both parties be accountable for the care and treatment of these animals would be a solution that would allow for long term and sustainable improvements in the lives of these horses, and it is extremely overdue.

Although bringing legal action to incidents of animal abuse taking place on tribal land is difficult, it is not impossible. Case law has now been established for federal authorities to intercede in animal abuse cases on tribal land. On April 14, 2016, Leland Joe of Havasupai was arrested by federal officials for two felony and two misdemeanor counts of animal cruelty and abuse to trail horses. Four of his horses were confiscated. This was a monumental day, as it was the first time an arrest of this kind has occurred on tribal land. His arrest was spurred by a vocal group of alarmed citizens, all whom had witnessed the abuse of these animals first hand, coming together and reaching out to various federal agencies. There are many tourists whom have witnessed abuse and stayed quiet about it upon returning home, often because they assumed there was nothing they could do, or that their single voice would not be enough. As we have learned by sharing our story, and in light of the recent arrest of Leland Joe, this is not true. It is critical that tourists document this abuse by taking photos, videos and providing written statements recounting what they saw. Both the FBI and Bureau of Indian Affairs should be contacted to report any documentation of abuse that is observed. Tourists should also reach out to Supai government officials. They have a website with email addresses for the various council members, and a mailing address.

Employing a standard of care is the ideal long term solution, however, implementing such procedures may take a while for outfitters to embrace, so for now, the public can help foster a change for these horses by refusing to use tour companies that continue the use of these packhorses. Visitors can easily utilize the helicopter option provided by Airwest Helicopters. The best method of all however, is choosing to pack your items yourself. Havasupai is a beautiful destination. The journey there will be made so much sweeter by choosing to explore it with compassion. Let’s offer a voice, in this place, to these animals who cannot speak for themselves.

Learn more about the Havasupai horses and how you can help:

Cover photo: Shannon L Haskie 

https://www.theoutbound.com/michelle-grinnell/putting-an-end-to-animal-abuse-at-havasu-falls

Congressional Hearing Rigged Against Wild Horses and Burros

by R.T. Fitch ~ in my most outraged opinion

Horse Haters Converged on D.C. to Plot “Final Solution” for Wild Horses and Burros

lossing ones mindDid you watch it?  Did you see it?  Did you love it?  With the exception of Ginger Kathrens, Executive Director of the Cloud Foundation, the witnesses who testified before the House Committee on Natural Resources, yesterday, read like the guest list of horse haters and eaters who formerly flocked to the now deceased Sue Wallis’ horse eating conventions. The BLM, Welfare Cattle interests, outspoken horse slaughter proponents, gads, my heart bled for poor Ginger sitting in a room full of so much filth and corruption. I am certain that she immediately showered after testifying in an effort to get all of that horse-hating funk off.

What a line-up:

  • Steve Ellis, BLM, right…like you are going to get some real pro-wild equine testimony there.
  • Dr. JJ Goicoechea, DVM, the current president of the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association and spoke on behalf of the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association, the Public Lands Council and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. “GO COWS”
  • Callie Hendrickson, Executive Director, White River & Douglas Creek Conservation Districts Chairwoman, American Farm Bureau Federation Federal Lands Issue Advisory Committee and outspoken Horse Slaughter proponent. “Pass me another slab of Filly Steak would ya Billy Bob”.
  • And Chairman of the committee, Tom McClintock, is a known wild horse and burro hater and his statements in this meeting make him GUILTY of violation of Title 18 (18 U.S.C. § 1001). Making false statements (18 U.S.C. § 1001) is the common name for the United States federal crime laid out in Section 1001 of Title 18 of the United States Code, which generally prohibits knowingly and willfully making false or fraudulent statements, or concealing information, in “any matter within the jurisdiction” of the federal government of the United States, even by mere denial 18 U.S. Code § 1519 – Destruction, alteration, or falsification of records in Federal investigations.  Current through Pub. L. 114-38. (See Public Laws for the current Congress.) US Code. “Can ya Dig IT?”

The only witness who spoke to facts and our sensibilities was Ginger;

“Overgrazing and overpopulation are overgeneralized in nonscientific claims by the BLM to justify removals of horses and donkeys from our public lands,” Ginger told the committee, “Wild Horses and Burros occupy only 11% of public lands where private cattle (welfare cows) outnumber them 47 to 1.”

Go Ginger, but did anybody hear that, anyone? I sincerely doubt it.

Over and over and over again our government agencies and representatives dance with our sensibilities’ and trample on our rights with the wild ones paying the price.

If you have the stomach for it, watch the video but it is as clear as the big fat nose on the front of my face that the goal is to send them all off to slaughter, for the sake of special interests, and then the feds and their bedfellows can pick another species to ride into extinction. If it were up to me, I would pick politicians; their eradication could only be a boom to the environment, society and the overall health of planet earth.

But that ain’t gonna happen. So saddle up and fight the good fight, we aren’t going to let the wild ones down, not on my watch, never.

Click “HERE” to view Friends of Wild Horses Protest at the idiot hearing

Lily, the Horse Shot with 130 Paintballs, DIES

UPDATE: Lily’s cause of death: A broken neck

Lily, the horse who gained national attention after getting shot up with a paintball gun, apparently died from a fall, causing her neck to break.

Dr. Rose Nolen-Walston, associate professor of Large Animal Internal Medicine at New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, tends to this 20-year-old Arabian horse who was shot with 130 rounds from a paintball gun earlier this year. Lily died Monday. Submitted photo

Dr. Rose Nolen-Walston, associate professor of Large Animal Internal Medicine at New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, tends to this 20-year-old Arabian horse who was shot with 130 rounds from a paintball gun earlier this year. Lily died Monday. Submitted photo

Tracey Stewart, who with her TV personality husband Jon adopted the horse last month, said she had grown to love the horse and spent much time with her at their 12-acre Bufflehead Farm in Colts Neck, New Jersey.

“Lily loved her time in the paddock munching on grass,” Tracey Stewart said. “During the day Lily got massages, baths and lots and lots of hugs. She slept soundly in her barn listening to soft music. Her favorite Pandora channel was Ray Lamontagne. “

Stewart said although they took very good care of the 20-year old Appaloosa/Arabian mix, it had health issues, some of them relating to the abuse she suffered at the hands of the person or persons who pelted her with paintballs while she was at the New Holland Sales Stables in Lancaster County earlier this year.

“Her bones were very frail,” Stewart said. “ She stumbled and fell hard on her neck causing a break. When we knew there was nothing more we could do for her we covered her in kisses and kind words and said our good-byes. Our hearts are aching we had so many more fun plans for her. She was beyond special and beyond loved.”

Stewart said she has no regrets adopting Lily, and she said she feels comforted she and her husband were able to treat the horse well in its final days.

“The hardest part of adopting animals that have suffered neglect is that you often don’t get to spend as much time as your heart would have liked,” she said.

The person or persons responsible for Lily’s injuries from the paintball gun still have not been caught. A reward of $10,000 is being offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those who shot Lily. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is contributing $4,000 toward the reward, the Humane Society another $5,000, and Omega Horse Rescue is chipping in $1,000.

http://www.dailylocal.com/article/DL/20160620/NEWS/160629978

Update: Wild Horse and Burro Radio covers BLM’s “Final Solution” for Exterminating America’s Protected Wild Herds, TONIGHT!!

painy

Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_Logo

Join us on Wild Horse Wednesdays®, June 22, 2016

6:00 pm PST … 7:00 pm MST … 8:00 pm CST … 9:00 pm EST

Listen to the archived show (HERE!)

You can also listen to the show on your phone by calling (917) 388-4520.

You can call in with questions during the 2nd half hour, by dialing (917) 388-4520, then pressing 1.

This show will be archived so you can listen to it anytime.

________________________________________

Carol Walker (Dir. of Field Documentation) and R.T. Fitch (Pres. and Co-Founder) of Wild Horse Freedom Federation host tonight’s show.  Our guest is Charlotte Roe, Founder of Wild Equid League of  Colorado and Advisor to The Cloud Foundation.  We’ll be detailing BLM’s cruel experiments on wild horses and burros that are a launching pad for widespread use by BLM as “population suppression” on the remaining wild horses and burros on public lands.  These heartless experiments are the endgame for wild horses and burros.  We’ll also tell you how you can help to stop these experiments.

BLM experiments include senseless laser ablation on 8 month old foals and, with along with partner Oregon State University, risky ovariectomies via colpotomy (pictures below) performed by veterinarian Leon Pielstick.

Pielstick 6Pielstick 7To contact us: ppj1@hush.com, or call 320-281-0585 Continue reading

Stop BLM’s cruel experiments using wild horses and burros as lab rats: Charlotte Roe, Founder of Wild Equid League of Colorado (& TCF Advisor) on Wild Horse & Burro Radio (Wed., 6/22/16)

painy

Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_Logo

Join us on Wild Horse Wednesdays®, June 22, 2016

6:00 pm PST … 7:00 pm MST … 8:00 pm CST … 9:00 pm EST

Listen to the archived show (HERE!)

You can also listen to the show on your phone by calling (917) 388-4520.

You can call in with questions during the 2nd half hour, by dialing (917) 388-4520, then pressing 1.

This show will be archived so you can listen to it anytime.

________________________________________

Carol Walker (Dir. of Field Documentation) and R.T. Fitch (Pres. and Co-Founder) of Wild Horse Freedom Federation host tonight’s show.  Our guest is Charlotte Roe, Founder of Wild Equid League of  Colorado and Advisor to The Cloud Foundation.  We’ll be detailing BLM’s cruel experiments on wild horses and burros that are a launching pad for widespread use by BLM as “population suppression” on the remaining wild horses and burros on public lands.  These heartless experiments are the endgame for wild horses and burros.  We’ll also tell you how you can help to stop these experiments.

BLM experiments include senseless laser ablation on 8 month old foals and, with along with partner Oregon State University, risky ovariectomies via colpotomy (pictures below) performed by veterinarian Leon Pielstick.

Pielstick 6Pielstick 7To contact us: ppj1@hush.com, or call 320-281-0585 Continue reading

BLM to Begin Conger and Frisco Wild Horse Stampede, Removal and Research

Unedited BLM Press Release

Helicopter drive-trapping operations are scheduled to begin Friday, July1

BLM's war on America's wild horses and burros ` photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

BLM’s war on America’s wild horses and burros ` photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

FILLMORE, Utah – The Bureau of Land Management’s Fillmore and Cedar field offices will soon be gathering and removing excess wild horses from within and outside the Conger and Frisco Wild Horse herd management areas in western Utah.

In these gathers, the BLM will remove approximately 250 excess wild horses from both the Conger and Frisco HMAs to achieve a research population of approximately 100 animals in each area. Based on past gather success, multiple gathers may be needed to achieve this population level. Some horses will be fitted with tracking devices and returned to the range as part of a research project.

Helicopter drive-trapping operations are scheduled to begin Friday, July1. Members of the public are welcome to view the daily gather operations, provided the safety of the animals, staff and observers are not jeopardized and operations are not disrupted.

The BLM will conduct escorted public tours to gather observation sites. Details will be announced daily on the BLM gather hotline, (435) 865-3030.

Those interested in participating should meet at the Border Inn Gas Station at the junction of Highway 6 and 50 on the Utah-Nevada state line, 88.6 miles west of Delta, Utah, where tours will depart at 6 a.m. MST.

Participants must provide their own transportation, water and food. The BLM recommends footwear and clothing suitable for harsh field conditions. Binoculars and four-wheel drive, high clearance vehicles are also strongly recommended.

Public lands will remain open unless closures are deemed necessary due to safety concerns. Outdoor recreationists and visitors to the gather area should be aware that there will be low flying helicopters and should avoid recreational use of drones near the Conger Mountain and Frisco Mountain area. Brief road closures may also be needed to allow movement of horses during gather operations.

Gather updates and information will be posted at: http://bit.ly/SinbadGather . Anyone interested can get updates on Twitter by following @BLMUtah or searching #SinbadGather2016.

Animals removed from the range will be made available for adoption through the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Adoption Program. Those that are not adopted will be cared for in long-term pastures, where they retain their protection under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act.

Some horses will be fitted with radio collars and global positioning system tracking devices and returned to both HMAs. This will provide data on free-roaming horse locations and movement to help the BLM improve understanding of herd behavior.

Details on the EA and the proposed action can be found on the BLM’s planning documents website: https://goo.gl/pNIggw .

More information on the population control research project is available from the BLM’s Fillmore Field Office at (435) 743-3100.