Wild Burros

Whistleblowers: Carol Walker & Debbie Coffey talk about wild horses and abandoned mines

Join us live Thursday September 10, 2020 at 7:00 pm CST!

5:00 pm PST…6:00 pm MST…7:00 pm CST…8:00 pm EST

Listen to the archived show→HERE!←

All shows will be archived and available 24/7 so you can listen at your convenience.

Hosted by Marti Oakley with Debbie Coffey & Carol Walker

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Whistleblowers! Brought to you in coordination with Marcel Reid and the annual Whistleblowers Summit in Washington D.C.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

photo by Carol Walker

Join us this evening as Carol Walker and Debbie Coffey, both wild horse advocates, document the wholesale obliteration of America’s wild horses. The claim by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Forestry service that the wild horses need to be eradicated, saying that they are destructive, is in stark contrast to the issue of abandoned mines.

In Oct. 2019, William Perry Pendley, who is exercising the authority of the Director of the Bureau of Land Management, told the Society of Environmental Journalists in a meeting in Colorado that wild horses were the biggest problem facing federal public lands in the West.

However, the BLM has estimated that there are about 500,000 abandoned mines in our nation.

The Government Accountability Office (the GAO) stated that in just the 13 Western states, the inventory puts abandoned mine estimates at 620,000.

As of January, 2017, lands administered by the BLM contained 52,381 abandoned mine sites, of which 80 percent require further investigation and/or remediation.

So what is the real problem? Wild horses? Or abandoned mines that pollute water resources among other things.

TO LEARN MORE:

March 2020  Government Accountability Office on Abandoned Hardrock Mines.  Click here.                                                                                    July 2011 Government Accountability Office report on Abandoned Mines.  Click here.                                                                                                 July 2008 Department of the Interior Inspector General report on Abandoned Mines.  Click here.

 

 

 

4 replies »

  1. Wow really hard question! Abandoned mines? BAAAAD! Or wild horses? GOOOD!
    Just a little sarcasm there – will be sure to listen tonite.

    Like

    • In our new coming film Mustangs & Renegades we show the brutal effects of Uranium mining on Wild Horses and local communities.
      Mustangs & Renegades will be released on September 24th on: https://vimeo.com/ondemand/mustangsrenegades

      In Mustangs & Renegades Carol Walker and I document the Adobe Town herd management area showing how fracking is effecting the wild horses there!

      Mustangs & Renegades is a deeply personal story, a complex web of events woven into the heart of the American West. It follows the true and personal account of documentary filmmaker, photographer James Anaquad Kleinert as he documents the roundup and removal of America’s wild horses. In revealing the plight of the horses, we reveal how America’s public lands – and our civil rights – are being systematically stripped away. This journey climaxes with James’ victory in federal court (Kleinert v. BLM has now set precedent in FOIA law), and segues into a conversation about moving forward into a Green Regenerative Economy. This is an epic and honest tale of activism, passion, perseverance and transformation that touches the core issues – the protection of our public lands, civil, environmental and indigenous rights – that are being called into question in our society. Stunning cinematography highlighting epic South Western landscapes and ecosystems, this is a film that audiences will resonate deeply with, as our plight to protect the wild horses mirrors our fight for a sustainable future.

      James Anaquad Kleinert – Director
      Email: jameskleinert@mac.com
      http://www.mustangsrenegades.com

      Liked by 2 people

Care to make a comment?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.