Glimpse into Horse Slaughter – Eagle Pass, Texas (raw video)

Video supplied by investigators from EWA and WHFF


“Quietly and behind the scenes the Equine Welfare Alliance and Wild Horse Freedom Federation have been watching, taking note and documenting more than just the unnecessary roundups of wild horses and burros by the BLM; but also paying attention to where tens of thousands of American horses and donkeys (domestic and wild) disappear to without even so much as a final wave goodbye.  Horse Slaughter has not been banned in the USA instead it has only moved across our borders and both our beloved domestic equines and our protected wild horses and burros continue to end up on the dinner plates of foreigners across the globe.

Below is simply raw video of what the horses go through as they cross the border from Texas to Mexico in the final hours of their precious lives.  No commentary, no music, no opinions as the footage speaks for itself.  We have simply released it to emphasis the need to act, of things to come and to remind those who participate in this predatory blood business that we are watching and taking names.  Yes, we are paying attention as the victims cannot speak for themselves but we can.  Let the kill buyer beware.  Keep the faith, my friends.  We are paying attention.” ~ R.T.


“Investigators with Wild Horse Freedom Federation/Equine Welfare Alliance spent several days down in Eagle Pass, Texas documenting events prior to slaughter horses being sent to Mexico for slaughter. Video shows horses being loaded for slaughter and them crossing over the border into Mexico, paperwork check by Gov. Official, going to weigh station and trucks coming into pen with slaughter horses.” ~ Investigator

Dewey County Sheriff’s ISPMB Official Update

Information supplied by Dewey County Sheriff’s Department

“The States Attorney has approved for the adoption applications that have been approved by ISPMB to continue to be loaded out for the next week or so…”

As of 530 PM 12-01-16 the Counties have not been repaid and no monies have been shown for the ISPMB 18 month plan. Therefore an auction for the horses is being setup.

too-weak-to-standThe States Attorney has approved for the adoption applications that have been approved by ISPMB to continue to be loaded out for the next week or so. The end date has not been set for this at this time due to weather, etc.

However there is a limit for the number of horses that can be adopted out from the ISPMB. The stipulation states that no more than 1/3 of the horses could be adopted out or (based on 810 horses) 270 horses. Also no more than 20 per person without prior consent of the counties.
If you have been approved and get the horses loaded out in the next week, now would be the time to get it done. Weather is suppose to improve through the weekend, and then turn colder again next week.

There are some other options still being looked at, but there is little time and hope left at this point.

Our best guess for the date on the sale will be around the 19th of Dec at Phillip Livestock in Phillip SD. However this has not been set yet and when it does become available I will post it here.

If you do not get your horses from the ISPMB then the next best option would be to buy them at the sale and save them there.

Do We Need a ‘Mustang-Safe’ Label for Beef?

SOURCE:  Pacific Standard Magazine

The response to an especially ugly round-up of wild horses in Oregon suggests we might.

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A group of wild horses are rounded up in Eureka, Nevada. (Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Any company that sells tuna—one of the most popular foods eaten globally—has the option of including a “dolphin safe” label on its product. Monitored by Earth Island International, the label ensures that your tuna was harvested without the use of drift gill nets, which often accidentally trap dolphin. The general idea behind this specialized labeling initiative is simple enough: Consumers should know if one animal species was killed in order for us to harvest another one.

Of course, the concept is necessarily discriminatory. An incalculable number of non-food animals die to bring food animals to our plates. Billions of rodents perish to grow corn and soy for animal feed; billions more are killed when rainforests are cleared for grazing cattle; and—if we want to throw insects into the mix—a nearly infinite number of them are exterminated as a sort of by-catch to accommodate humanity’s steady diet of meat, eggs, and dairy.

But—justifiably or not—dolphins are in a special category. Not only are dolphins unusually intelligent creatures, but they are non-threatening to humans, threatening to sharks, beloved performers at SeaWorld, popular stuffed animals, and frequently anthropomorphized for the purposes of television entertainment. For these reasons, humans (in Western cultures at least) have invested dolphins with a special status. Whatever the precise nature of that status, it’s enough to make dolphin protection a priority on a can of tuna fish.

Many Americans share the view that there’s something sort of majestically sacred about mustangs, at least sacred enough to prevent welfare-ranchers from selling us subsidized beef at the supermarket.

To accept this preferential logic compels us to lend other iconic animals special status as well. The most notably comparable case might be the wild horse—or mustang. Western ranchers holding permits from the Bureau of Land Management to graze cattle on public land compete with mustangs for access to forage within designated wild horse habitats. While 2014 year-end grazing receipts show the equivalent of at least 37 cattle for every wild horse on grazing lands managed by the BLM, mustangs aren’t in any way privileged beyond the soft protections offered by the 1971 Wild Horse and Burros Act. As a result, public-land ranchers routinely call on the BLM to round-up wild horses and remove them from federal land, preserving the forage for cattle. The BLM pens the captured mustangs in a holding facility, from which few are adopted and most die in captivity. Thousands, as revealed by a recent investigative report from the Department of the Interior, have been sold to “kill buyers” and shipped to Mexico for slaughter.

BLM round-up targeting 1,400 mustangs (half the population of the state) was recently completed in Oregon. It played out in familiar fashion. A Burns, Oregon, rancher organization called the Beatys Butte Grazing Association pressured the BLM to remove horses from a federally designated wild horse habitat. The BLM complied. Several members of Beatys Butte market their beef through a cooperative called Country Natural Beef, which is a major supplier to Whole Foods.

READ THE REST OF THE STORY HERE.

 

MORE Managing For Extinction?

 Observation by Grandma Gregg

What the ‘ell strategy is BLM using now?  Their internet adoption in the past has been for ADOPTION of wild horses and burros with a minimum bid of $125 and a written promise that the adopter would not sell the wild horse or burro to slaughter for at least a year – but now it appears that they are auctioning off our wild horses online for $25!

We know that in the past, the BLM has sold older sale authority horses and burros for as little as $10 each – with free delivery if you bought a trailer load – and we also know that many of these have gone to disappeared into the BLM’s never seen again pipeline – but now they are auctioning them off online for as little as $25 to prospective kill-buyers?

Below are two examples of older mares captured last summer from Sulphur Utah that BLM just auctioned offto someone in Oregon for $25 with free delivery to misc. sites – including some VERY questionable locations that have been known to have kill-buyers lurking.

Does anyone actually believe that these beautiful older mares are going to find happy, healthy and safe “forever homes”???

Or will it be the same kind of “home” that Tom Davis gave the 1,700 that BLM sold to him and conveniently “disappeared”?


Recent Sales Figures
Fiscal Year Mustangs Burros Total
2014 17 58 75
2013 22 43 65
2012 320 71 391
2011 855 16 871
2010 528 15 543
2009 772 19 791

The BLM’s sale authority figures have dropped WAY WAY down since the article came out in Sept of 2012 about BLM selling hundreds and hundreds of our wild horses to Tom Davis who could not account for the horses and burros whereabouts or well-being. (see chart)

Did that “discovery” actually slow the sales to questionable buyers way down?

OR

Did that “discovery” just channel the BLM to get rid of them with a different plan?
Such as … selling from LTH by the truck load and not including those in the “sales” chart?

OR

Are they experimenting with selling our older horses on the internet for a mere pittance?

OR

Selling them from Palomino Valley (and Fallon etc.) with no brands? (I have seen them at P/V with no brand or tag#)

Not to mention selling them directly from the range when nobody is looking?

Current Time is Dec 6, 2014 10:39:57 PM Central Time
Bidding is now over.

Category: Delta, UT
PREVIOUS HORSE NEXT HORSE

 

 Mare1 Sex: Mare Age: 16 Years   Height (in hands): 14Necktag #: 5350   Date Captured: 08/01/14Color: Dun   Captured: Sulphur (UT)Notes:
#5350 – 16 yr old dun mare, captured August 1, 2014 in the Sulphur HMA, UT (Freezemark:98745350 Signalment:HF1AAAABM).Her foal is #5358, an 7 mo old gelding, that will be weaned and adopted separately.For more information on the Sulphur HMA: http://goo.gl/7qH4On (must copy & paste link into browser).This horse is located at the Delta Wild Horse Corrals, Delta, Utah. For more information please contact Heath Weber at hweber@blm.gov or call 435-864-4068.Pick up options (by appt): Delta, UT; Elm Creek, NE; Pauls Valley, OK; Piney Woods, MS.Other pick up options: Brandon, FL (Jan 30); DeRidder, LA (Feb 20).Adoption confirmation for this animal must be finalized no later than Noon Nov 20th.

We will be offering mare #5350 up for adoption at a reduced rate due to her age through the Internet Adoption on Nov 4-18.

Number of Bids: 1
Winning bid: $25.00
High Bidder: OR7783
Category: Delta, UT
PREVIOUS HORSE NEXT HORSE
 Mare2 Sex: Mare Age: 12 Years   Height (in hands): 14.1Necktag #: 5345   Date Captured: 08/01/14Color: Dun   Captured: Sulphur (UT)Notes:
#5345 – 12 yr old dun mare, captured August 1, 2014 in the Sulphur HMA, UT (Freezemark:02745345 Signalment:HF1AAAAAM).Her foal is #5356, an 8 mo old gelding, that will be weaned and adopted separately.For more information on the Sulphur HMA: http://goo.gl/7qH4On (must copy & paste link into browser).This horse is located at the Delta Wild Horse Corrals, Delta, Utah. For more information please contact Heath Weber at hweber@blm.gov or call 435-864-4068.Pick up options (by appt): Delta, UT; Elm Creek, NE; Pauls Valley, OK; Piney Woods, MS.Other pick up options: Brandon, FL (Jan 30); DeRidder, LA (Feb 20).Adoption confirmation for this animal must be finalized no later than Noon Nov 20th.

If gelding #5345 is not adopted during the November 4-14, 2014 Internet Adoption, she will be available for adoption starting Dec 1st on a first come, first serve basis $125.00 with pick-up ONLY at the Delta Wild Horse Corrals in Delta, Utah.

We will be offering mare #5345 up for adoption at a reduced rate due to her age through the Internet Adoption on Nov 4-18.

Number of Bids: 1
Winning bid: $25.00
High Bidder: OR7783
 Sale Program
Sale ProgramBLM Wild Horse and Burro Sale Information
View on www.blm.gov Preview by Yahoo

Mare1I don’t trust BLM any further than I can throw them.And yet these beautiful wild mares are in BLM’s “protection”! Mare2

Update: Animal’s Angels Recent Horse Slaughter Auction Investigations

Information supplied by Animal’s Angels

Middleburg Horse Auction, PA 1/28/12

Investigators attended the monthly horse auction in Middleburg, PA. There were approx 150 horses present in the pen area. The “slaughter prospects” were kept in groups of 4 – 6 horses per pen in the darkest area of the barn. Several of them were thin, one mule had a swollen hind leg and one chestnut mare had several open sores on her body. The sale started at 11:48am. The usual kill buyers Rotz and Moore were present and buying many of the horses under $500.00. An unknown buyer with the buyer number 500 was purchasing several horses the kill buyers didn’t want for as low as $10. Brian Moore was there with his large tractor/trailer and so was Bruce Rotz.

While the investigators were checking the parking lot, they noticed that the truck from Diamond K Ranch (kill buyer Arlow Kiehl) was also present. There were already several horses inside the trailer, including a not segregated stallion. Additionally, for the first time a Canadian truck from Capron Trucking in Ontario was observed. The truck was parked in front of Brian Moore’s truck and ready to load horses. Animals’ Angels will continue to monitor this auction.

Hoover Horse Auction, New Holland, PA 2/4/12

Animals’ Angels investigators arrived at the monthly auction at 8:40am. There were close to 350 horses in the barn and several more in an outside pen.  Hoover announced prior to the sale that there were horses present from states as far away as Minnesota. The inside pens were packed full and horses were observed fighting and kicking. Several horses were quit thin. One pen contained a group of 17 mules and one of them had a bleeding eye injury. In most pens the plastic water buckets were empty. The outside pen, that had never been occupied during previous visits, contained horses without sales tags. They were standing in deep mud and we were told by an auction visitor that these horses would ship straight to slaughter. Kill buyer Bruce Rotz arrived with his stock trailer at 10:00am. His large tractor/trailer was parked empty at the New Holland Auction parking lot. Kill buyer Brian Moore arrived with his truck 10 minutes later.

Mystery Surrounding Abandoned Horses Finally Solved

Information supplied by the Equine Welfare Alliance

 Deceit and Cruelty Exposed in Predatory Horse Slaughter Business

Ironically, while the horse slaughter lobby has been claiming abandonment was a result of a lack of slaughter, it now appears it is in large part a result of the practice.

Chicago (EWA) – A six month investigation by the EWA and other animal investigation organizations has finally determined the predominant source of abandoned horses in the Southwestern US. The findings show that most or all of more than 5,000 horses a year are being abandoned after being rejected for slaughter at the Mexican border.

The investigation explains the source and reason for abandonments, most of which have been reported in the vast stretches of isolated land north of the Mexican border since 2009. Most of these horses could clearly be identified as domestic stock from such indications as nail holes in their hooves (where shoes had recently been removed) but no other clues to their source were found.

Until now articles about their discovery have speculated that they were abandoned by individual owners because they could no longer afford to feed them. The horse slaughter lobby has further suggested that this was made worse because individuals “no longer had a slaughter option”.

Equine advocates countered this hypothesis by pointing out that there had been no decrease in slaughter to force such actions, and that the areas where they were being found did not have significant domestic horse populations.

Moreover, it made no sense that someone who could not afford to euthanize and bury a horse would elect instead to pay for hauling it hundreds or thousands of miles only to turn it loose. In fact, many horse advocates had good reason to suspect the reports were bogus.

Following the closure of US horse slaughter plants in 2007, there were a large number of stories published claiming horses were being abandoned because of a lack of slaughter. These reports ranged from reclaimed strip mines in Kentucky to the Florida Everglades and Oregon ranches. For a year each of these was investigated and found to be false or hugely distorted.

But in the past two years there have been an increasing number of authenticated reports of abandoned horses, mostly in the remote stretches of the southwest Border States. A few of these horses actually had hide removed, apparently to obscure a brand.

In August, the first piece of the puzzle fell into place when approximately 300 horses were spotted from the air starving and dead in a remote feedlot near the port-of-entry town of Presidio, Texas. The fact that living horses were found in different stages of starvation and the dead horses were in various stages of decomposition, indicated they had been dumped there at different times.

The situation became all the more puzzling when it was revealed that the feedlot was operated by the C4 Cattle Company and Intermeat Inc./Dallas Crown the Belgian meat company that had formerly operated the Dallas Crown horse slaughter plant in Kaufman, Texas. The company buys horses for slaughter in Mexico. It was also discovered that about 40 of the horses came from kill buyer Trenton Saulters.

The question was of course why they had left the horses to perish only a few miles from the border crossing where they could have been sold to the slaughter plants in Mexico.

An answer came in the European Union’s (EU’s) report (DG(SANCO) 2010-8524 – MR) from the 2010 audit of their horse slaughter plants in Mexico. In section 5.2.1.2, the report divulged that Mexico had rejected 5,336 slaughter horses out of 62,560 presented at six OISAs (Border Crossing Offices) during the audit period between January and October 2010.

The horses were rejected under a new system of controls implemented in December, 2009. Reasons for rejection included health problems, advanced pregnancy and injuries.

The final piece of the puzzle came from an investigation by EWA on how the USDA’s APHIS (Animal and Plant Inspection Service) tracks horses bound for slaughter. EWA’s Valerie James-Patton was researching the Owner/Shipper certificate system which is supposed to allow APHIS to assure humane regulations are being followed. When asked what happens to horses rejected at the Mexican border, she was told simply “they fall out of the system.”

Normally kill buyers who haul slaughter horses to Mexico try to fill their trailers with cattle and other animals on the return journey. So clearly they need to dispose of the rejected horses, and the most economical way to do so is to simply abandon them on a deserted stretch of road or in an isolated lot.

Ironically, while the horse slaughter lobby has been claiming abandonment was a result of a lack of slaughter, it now appears it is in large part a result of the practice.