John Holland (Pres., Equine Welfare Alliance) and Simone Netherlands (Pres., Salt River Wild Horse Management Group) on Dept. of Interior’s plan to kill over 46,000 wild horses in BLM facilities and on public lands, and on fighting against horse slaughter in the U.S., on Wild Horse & Burro Radio (Wed., 9/13/17)

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Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_LogoJoin us on Wild Horse Wednesdays®, this Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017

5:00 p.m. PST … 6:00 p.m. MST … 7:00 p.m. CST … 8:00 p.m. EST

Listen to the archived show (HERE!)

You can also listen to the show on your phone by calling (917) 388-4520.

You can call in with questions during the 2nd half hour, by dialing (917) 388-4520, then pressing 1.

This show will be archived so you can listen to it anytime.

Our guests tonight are John Holland, Pres. of Equine Welfare Alliance and Simone Netherlands (Pres. of The Salt River Wild Horse Management Group, and Spokeswoman for American Wild Horse Campaign).  They will be talking about issues including stopping horse slaughter from being approved in the U.S., and the Dept. of the Interior’s language in the 2018 Budget to kill over 46,000 wild horses & burros in holding, and tens of thousands more on public lands.

Equine Welfare Alliance (EWA), is a dues free, all volunteer 501(c)(3) umbrella organization representing over 330 member organizations, over 1,200 individual members worldwide in 23 countries and the Southern Cherokee Government. EWA is dedicated to ending the slaughter of American horses and the preservation and protection of Wild Horses & Burros on public lands.

The Salt River Wild Horse Management Group (SRWHMG) is an Arizona-based nonprofit organization dedicated to monitoring, studying and protecting the Salt River wild horses.

Advocates of Arizona’s wild horses delivered a 300,000-signature petition to Sen. Jeff Flake’s office in Phoenix, opposing the mass killing of federally protected horses and burros across the U.S.

The treatment tank at the Cavel horse slaughterhouse in DeKalb, IL, taken just months before it closed in 2007. Cavel was never in compliance on its discharge during its period of operation.

This show will be co-hosted by R.T. Fitch (Pres.) and Debbie Coffey (V.P. and Dir. of Wild Horse Affairs) of Wild Horse Freedom Federation.

To contact us: ppj1@hush.com, or call 320-281-0585

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/marti-oakley/2017/09/14/john-holland-pres-equine-welfare-alliance-and-simone-netherlands

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Video: Equine Advocates Alarmed Over Salt River Wild Horse Harassment

Source: Salt River Wild Horse Management Group and ABC15.com

Public Harassment May Have Caused Foal’s Death

From Simone Netherlands; “Dear Supporters of the horses, please click this link first, then you can leave a comment under ABC15’s post about the harassment of wild horses. The more you care, the more you share, the more people will be aware. Thank you!”

http://www.abc15.com/news/state/animal-advocates-concerned-about-horse-harassment

‘Cactus Fire’ foal born near Bush Highway brush fire last week

Source: Tuscon News

“We recognize how lucky we are to still have this amazing natural resource in our backyard and despite facing many human-caused challenges, the Tonto National Forest remains one of the most magnificent pieces of “wild” we have left in Arizona.”

SALT RIVER – The Cactus Fire on Bush Highway may have left behind thousands of scorched acres.

But something good came from the ashes: a tiny foal was born, after a pregnant mare gave birth close to the fire.

One concern during the Cactus Fire was that the flames would endanger the Salt River wild horses in the area.

But now, the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group reports that all wild horses in the fires’ vicinity have been located and are safe.

And that includes the very pregnant mare, who gave birth on Wednesday morning not even half a mile from where the fire was raging.

Despite starting his life at such a dangerous time with ashes falling all around, the group reports that the wild colt is doing great.

His name? “Cactus Fire,” of course!

The wild colt’s first day might not have turned out so well were it not for the quick action by Forest Service officials.

[READ MORE: Cactus Fire on Bush Highway expected to grow with planned burn, containment possible]

The Salt River Wild Horse Management Group estimates that less than 1 percent of the horses’ habitat has burned.

[Slideshow: Cactus Fire burns in East Valley]

The group had a chance to thank the fire fighters in person and also sent a heartfelt letter to the forest service. The fire fighters stated that they loved the thank you cards with a picture of the new baby on it.

In the blink of an eye it could have all been gone , states Simone Netherlands, president of the group, “We recognize how lucky we are to still have this amazing natural resource in our backyard and despite facing many human-caused challenges, the Tonto National Forest remains one of the most magnificent pieces of “wild” we have left in Arizona.”

The SRWHMG, who also repairs the fences along Bush highway, is going to make sure that the fences damaged in the fire will be fixed to keep the horses safe. Anyone who sees an injured wild horse can call the emergency hotline.

 Letter to Editor from the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group:

“Letter of Gratitude: To all of the U.S. Forest Service employees, hot shot crews and each of the brave firefighters assigned to the Cactus Fire,

On behalf of 80 volunteers, and the public of Arizona, the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group would like to express our deepest gratitude for your hard and brave work to fight the Cactus Fire.

We do not take lightly the commitment you have shown to our public lands and our community. By assigning the crews and resources – including the lifesaving “bambi bucket” helicopter — to contain a fire that could have threatened all of the Tonto National Forest you saved the critical habitat it provides for thousands of species, including the Salt River wild horses.

We greatly appreciate the open line of communication with the Forest Supervisor as well as with those fighting the fire – including the awesome helicopter crew who gave us fascinating insight into the fire’s progression and the efforts to contain it.
While the fire spread from 20 acres to 200 acres in a matter of hours, and later consumed 800 acres, it was not threatening structures or people and was not the only wildfire burning in Arizona. Yet, you did not take any chances with the Tonto National Forest and we are so grateful for that.

Hotshot firefighter crews battled until 1 a.m. on Tuesday night and on Wednesday, our people stationed at Goldfield, cheered loudly when we saw the green helicopter take off with the bambi bucket. Soon after that the black clouds turned to white and later to small puffs floating here and there. At that point we could, quite literally, breathe again.

For you brave men, we are aware that every time you go into a fire, you face danger and unpredictability and are risking your lives. We know this all too well, as one of our volunteer members is Amanda Marsh. Amanda is the widow of Eric Marsh, the superintendent of the Granite Mountain Hotshots who so tragically perished in the Yarnell Hill Fire in 2013. Amanda Marsh wants us to let you know that Eric, who loved the wild horses, would have been proud of the work that you have done to protect the Tonto National Forest from the Cactus Fire.

Not only did you protect our people, but also you stopped the fire from killing countless wild animals and destroying their habitat.
We are pleased to report that all Salt River wild horses have been located and are safe, including a very pregnant mare we were monitoring. She gave birth to a healthy foal Wednesday morning, less than a half a mile from where the fire was raging. We named the new colt “Cactus Fire.”

Despite facing many human-caused challenges, the Tonto National Forest remains one of the most bountiful and magnificent pieces of “wild” we have left in Arizona. We recognize how lucky we are to have this amazing natural resource in our backyard.”

http://www.SaltRiverWildHorseManagementGroup.org

The Salt River Wild Horse Management Group is an Arizona non-profit organization dedicated to protect, monitor and study the Salt River wild horses. The SRWHMG has documented the herd for almost twenty years and has been spearheading the effort to secure lasting protections for this iconic and beloved wild horse herd in the Tonto National Forest.

Cactus Fire Threatening AZ Salt River Wild Horses

Visiting Arizona’s Salt River Wild Horses

Wild Horse Freedom Federation Meets Salt River Wild Horse Management Group

Left to Right, Terry Fitch, Simone Netherlands, Robin O’Donnell

It’s been a long time coming but finally the planets came into alignment and the circumstances coincided so that Terry and I could visit our long time friend, Simone Netherlands and many of her local friends and members of the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group.  We have been promising to stop by and visit the aquatic ponies for year and with a motorized trip across the U.S. things worked out perfectly for a day of wild equine observation.

Salt River Wild Horse Management Group members Destini Rhone, Simone Netherlands and Robin O’Donnell

With this short post I am not including any pictures of the horses, proper, because my main mission on such excursions is to take pictures of the photographers who are taking the real pictures (using my iPhone no less).  So with that said, I will be including Terry’s photos once we are static and no longer moving.

Terry and Simone…horses behind

While at the river, I had the opportunity to participate in a live feed with Simone on Facebook and posted on Salt River Wild Horse Management Group’s page, if you clink on the link/image you are free to view.

Click Image to view video on timeline

And with that said I will let the video and the pictures do the talking as we load up the Jeep for another day of adventure.

Many thanks to Salt River Wild Horse Management Group president Simone Netherlands and members Robin O’Donnell and Destini Rhone for donating an entire day to take the time to show us the beautiful wild equines that reside along Arizona’s picturesque Salt River…ya’all must go see for yourselves.

Keep the faith.

Amazing Recognition of Death in Wild Horses

reported by Salt River Wild Horse Management Group

“Sad, but beautiful. …”

“Many times I have heard our good friend, Ginger Kathrens, say that our fight for the wild horses is all about their Freedom and Family…this story speaks to the heart and verifies that Ginger is spot on in her description of what wild horses are all about.  Many thanks to all the great people at Salt River Wild Horse Management Group for sharing this poignant moment with us.” ~ R.T.


We did our very best today, to help a young wild mare who’s baby had gotten stuck and died during delivery. Our experienced field team had jumped into action and our vet was getting there as fast as she could, but sadly the mare went into septic shock and passed, the baby had simply been stuck for too long. She was a beautiful dun mare, just 2 years old, her name was Clydette, daughter of Bonnie.

But just as nature gave us heavy hearts and reminded us of how harsh it can be sometimes, it then immediately showed us how amazing it is also. So we’d like to concentrate on that, as it gave us all goosebumps.

Right after we moved away from her body, we witnessed how her band came and nuzzled her, after which the roan, her lead stallion, cried out for her very loudly. Shortly after that, they moved away from her body but stayed close.

Other bands heard that call and suddenly came out of nowhere and then knew exactly where the lifeless body lied, even while there were no other bands around when she passed.

What happened next was amazing; the other bands stood in line taking turns saying their goodbye’s. First one band, then another. Then the two lead stallions of those two bands got into a short power struggle. Then you can see how Clydette’s lead stallion comes running back one last time letting out a short scream in a last effort to protect her, or perhaps to tell everyone that she was his.

It takes a most highly intelligent species to understand and actually mourn death. We have seen bands mourn their losses before, but for other bands to come and mourn her death also was simply awe inspiring. These animals have evolved to have amazing survival skills and very close and protective family bonds. In this natural behavior, lies true scientific value.

This video was taken after her own band (with the powerful roan) had already said their goodbyes and walked on. This is approximately 30 minutes after she had died. We invite everyone to draw their own conclusions.

We thank all of the bystanders and public who were very considerate, helpful and respectful in particular the lady who called this in. Our emergency number is (480)868-9301

Rest in peace Clydette and little Tootie.

(Baby was named by member Destini Rhone who lost her aunt Tootie on this same day, rest in peace aunt Tootie also.)

Reward Increased for Information Related to Shooting of Salt River Wild Horses

by Max Walker as published on Arizona ABC 15

“…a matching donation from Animal Recovery Missions Investigations of Florida, has more than doubled what was previously a $12,500 reward.”

Click Image to View Video

Click Image to View Video

PHOENIX – Officials say the reward for information relating to the shooting of several wild horses living along the Salt River is now $25,000.

A release from the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group (SRWHMG) says a matching donation from Animal Recovery Missions Investigations of Florida, has more than doubled what was previously a $12,500 reward.

The Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office is investigating after one horse was killed and two others were injured in a shooting on October 21.

As of Monday, SRWHMG officials said no tips leading to the suspect’s apprehension had been received.

MCSO says a witness saw a man wearing black shorts and a dark green shirt shooting horses along the Salt River near the Pebble Beach Recreation Area.

Anyone with information is asked to call the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office at 602-876-1011.

http://www.abc15.com/news/state/reward-increased-for-information-related-to-shooting-of-wild-salt-river-horses

Baby Wild Horse Killed, Mutilated along Salt River AZ, Suspects Sought

Story by Monique Griego as published on Channel 12 TV

“They’re like family and to see something like this happen it just breaks your heart,”

MESA, Ariz. – A family of Salt River Wild Horses went from 9 to 8 members after one of the band’s youngest foals, a 6-month-old horse called Kai by local observers, was chased down shot and killed.

knxv-salt-river-horse“This is absolutely horrible to us, these horses are our family,” said Simone Netherlands, the president of the Salt River Wild Horses Management Group.

SRWHMG is a non-profit that tracks and watches over the various bands of wild horses in the area.

Netherlands says shots from what’s believed to be a shotgun also injured two other horses, and the horrific brutality didn’t end there.

“We can’t imagine who would do such a thing and the most horrible part of it is that the genitals were removed off of the dead horse,” she said.

Volunteers say someone mutilated Kai after the baby horse went down from multiple gunshot wounds, some to the head and neck.

READSuspect allegedly killed, mutilated Salt River horse

Another wild horse, named Dotty, was shot and killed near the Salt River around this same time last year.

“An animal you’re not going to eat, it’s not bothering you, it doesn’t attack you,” said volunteer Jake Jacobson.

“They’re like family and to see something like this happen it just breaks your heart,” said Mary Ann Jacobson, another volunteer with the management group.

Volunteers tracked the band of horses Monday night to check on the two also injured. The good news is that they seemed to be healing on their own.

The suspect is only described as a man, wearing a dark green shirt and black shorts or underwear. Witnesses told investigators he was with two other people.

The Maricopa County Sheriff’s office said Monday night it was mobilizing a mounted posse to look for evidence and investigate the shootings.

“It’s getting out of hand, they’ve got to stop this guy whoever it is,” said Jake.

Anyone with information on the case is asked to call MCSO. A reward is being offered for information leading to an arrest.

The Salt River Wild Horse Management group is trying to increase the reward money with a GoFundMe page.

http://www.12news.com/news/local/arizona/baby-horse-killed-mutilated-along-salt-river-suspects-sought/341138997

http://www.abc15.com/news/state/mcso-searching-for-suspect-who-shot-three-salt-river-horses-killing-at-least-one

http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/mesa-breaking/2016/10/24/mcso-seeks-gunman-who-shot-salt-river-horses-killing-least-one/92680528/

AZ Gov Officially Signs Wild Horse Protection Bill

Source: The Fountain Hills Times

“The Salt River horses are beautiful, majestic and a treasure to our state,”

Governor Doug Ducey has officially signed House Bill 2340, providing extra protection to the wild horse herd that makes the Lower Salt River and Saguaro Lake area their home.

Photo by Julie Bradshaw of Salt River Wild Horse Management Group

Photo by Julie Bradshaw of Salt River Wild Horse Management Group

The passage of the bill was announced during a press conference on May 11, featuring support from Representative Kelly Townsend, who reworked the most recent version of the bill, as well as Sheriff Joe Arpaio and advocates for the Salt River herd.

“The Salt River horses are beautiful, majestic and a treasure to our state,” Governor Ducey said in a statement. “Since last summer, we have worked to protect them and their ability to roam free.”

Last year, the Tonto National Forest Service announced that approximately 100 horses historically living near the Salt River would be “impounded,” as they had been labeled as stray animals, turned out by their owners.

Public outcry led to Tonto National Forest Supervisor Neil Bosworth postponing any decision involving the horses.

While a form of the recently signed bill was already passed by the Senate, it was argued that the wording did not fully protect the horses and needed to be reworked. To provide further protection, Rep. Townsend consulted with The Salt River Wild Horse Management Group in order to strengthen the bill, making it illegal to “take, harass, kill or otherwise interfere” with the wild horses.

That proposal was sent to the Senate and met with approval and, last week, returned to the House where it received a vote of 53-3. With Gov. Ducey’s support, HB2340 is now official.

“Many Arizonans were rightly outraged when the future of the Salt River Horse was put at risk, and I was clear then that I would do everything in my power to protect them from danger,” Ducey said in his statement. “Today, I am proud to sign a bill that paves the way [for] state, local and federal forces to work together to keep them free from interference or harassment.”

http://www.fhtimes.com/news/local_news/gov-ducey-signs-horse-bill-into-law/article_517773de-1c6d-11e6-82fe-2b1ada21141b.html

AZ Gov Signs Bill to Protect Salt River Wild Horses

by Howard Fischer Capitol Media Services as published on Tucson.com

“There’s rules now that we all are going to have to abide by…”

“Hats off to Simone Netherlands, the Salt River Wild Horse Management Group and all those who worked behind the scenes to make this happen.  Job well done.” ~ R.T.


A Salt River horse and foal graze at Butcher Jones Recreational Area in Tonto National Forest located near Mesa on Thursday, August 6, 2015.(Photo: Isaac Hale / The Republic)

A Salt River horse and foal graze at Butcher Jones Recreational Area in Tonto National Forest located near Mesa on Thursday, August 6, 2015.(Photo: Isaac Hale / The Republic)

PHOENIX — A herd of about 500 wild horses along the Salt River could soon get protection from everything from being removed by the Forest Service to being harassed by drunken tourists.

Gov. Doug Ducey signed a bill that makes it illegal to harass, shoot, injure or slaughter a horse that is part of the herd. And even capturing or euthanizing a horse that is injured or is causing problems would require written authorization from either the state Department of Agriculture or the Maricopa County sheriff.

Rep. Kelly Townsend, R-Mesa, who spearheaded the legislation, said this should end the threats to the herd that began last year after the U.S. Forest Service announced it would round up the horses in the Tonto National Forest and sell them to protect the environment in and around the river. Environmental groups sided with the federal agency.

But that provoked an outcry from horse lovers and even a lawsuit to prevent their removal.

The Forest Service agreed to back off, at least for the time being. This new law specifically authorizes the state to enter into an agreement with the federal agency where the state would effectively be in charge of managing the herd.

More to the point, Townsend said, it shields the herd from humans, well-intentioned or otherwise.

“We had some folks that would go down there and maybe had been drinking too much and wanted to ride a horse,” she said. “And the worst part is when the folks would be down there shining a light on a mare when she was foaling.”

All that, Townsend said, should come to an end.

“There’s rules now that we all are going to have to abide by,” she said.

Well, not exactly.

The language of HB 2340 says the provisions take effect only if an agreement is hammered out with the Forest Service by the end of next year. But Townsend said she is convinced that will happen, noting that a Forest Service official was at Wednesday’s signing ceremony with the governor.